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  • Banter and crowd involvement

    how much is enough and how much is too much ?

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  • #2
    It depends on the crowd, and how good you are at engaging them between songs.
    "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminate period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'

    "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

    Solipsism is the new empiricism. -Alan Burdick

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    • #3
      You want to see enough. I can't believe there is a Youtbube video of this but this happened downstate NY near Albany. We were playing a ski resort and drunk kids started pitching these glow sticks. I was really mad and almost went after someone that night in March of 2010. I remember it vividly. This happened but then I got hit and the horn players also. Check this out. It was too much and no security did anything about it. I found this video a short time after we did the gig:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXFHOzvi7xs
      "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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      • #4
        I can only reply from an audience perspective since praise bands don't tend to much patter, at least ours doesn't. First, keep it short. You're a musician, not a stand up comic. They're not there to listen to you tell jokes. Second, keep it relevant or at least interesting. If there's a funny, or at least interesting, short story about how you wrote one of your originals or the first time you played a specific cover that's coming up, tell it, not what you had for breakfast. Third, keep it appropriate. A couple of years ago my wife and I went with another couple to hear the Melvin Turnage Band (R&B, Motown) and at one point the gal fronting the band told a long story about getting laid in the car right before a gig. Frankly, I did not need to hear that.
        Last edited by DeepEnd; 10-01-2018, 04:03 PM.
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        • #5
          It depends on the audience.

          In our weekly marina gig, there is a lot of banter with the crowd, same for the monthly gig we play at a RV resort.

          On other gigs, we hardly say a word.

          The object is to figure out what your function is on that particular gig, what today's audience wants, and do your best to deliver.

          Insights and incites by Notes
          Bob "Notes" Norton
          Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
          Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
          The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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          • #6
            When you are doing it to “fill time”, then you are doing it too much. If it is flowing and feels like part of the set and is working well, you should know it instinctively.

            If you’re forcing it, or if the audience or the rest of the band is looking at you to get on with the next song already? Then it’s gone on too long.

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            • #7
              You’re a musician not a comedian. I’ve found those who banter a lot are not good players/singers. A little talking every few songs is cool. But they want to hear you play/sing believe me.

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              • #8
                It's pretty situational based on the crowd/event. If you do it to a packed dance floor the band had better be doing something behind you LOL. Keep it short and you will be fine.

                I mean sometimes you have to do it cause of instrument changes or technical difficulties, but we generally try to keep things moving: as noted they came to drink and hear music, not see a comedy show. But some good banter can enhance the experience.
                Vocal Gear: Audix OM3xb, Boss VE-20 | Synth Gear: iPad running OnSong Korg iM1, Poison-202, Korg iMonoPoly, FM Player, Moog Model D, DM1 | Controllers: M-Audio Axiom Pro 61, Roland AX7 via Yamaha MD-BT01 Bluetooth

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                • #9
                  If I have a dancing crowd, I go from song to song with no pause between them. When the crowd tires as they eventually do, that's when I'll talk, but only if appropriate for the gig.

                  If you do enough gigs and pay attention, you develop a feel for when to talk, when to joke, and when to keep your mouth shut between songs.

                  It's all about doing the best job for the audience you have in front of you at the moment.

                  Insights and incites by Notes
                  Bob "Notes" Norton
                  Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                  Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
                  The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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                  • #10
                    Well yest in that respect. I misread the post. The video I posted above was a bad situation.
                    "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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                    • #11
                      A good rule of thumb is to simply pay attention to your audience.

                      If you are lucky enough to be on stage long enough, the audience will tell you what songs they want to hear, how loud to play them, how long to play them, when to banter or not, and so on.

                      What we do is not a lecture but a dialog with the audience. Give them what they want, when they want it, and they will give you applause and repeat business in return.

                      Insights and incites by Notes
                      Bob "Notes" Norton
                      Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                      Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
                      The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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                      • #12
                        Yes and that can be tricky as well. You kind of have to be selfless about it. Some singers and musicians miss the mark in this way.
                        "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          True. You have to always know why you are there, why you are being paid, and what benefit can you provide to the person who is hiring you.

                          We are artists, but we work on commission. DaVinci, Michelangelo, Mozart, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and so many other artists worked on commission to please their benefactors. So we feel no shame, but in fact privilege to please our benefactors.

                          What does the entertainment purchaser want? What can we do to provide that better than our competitors?

                          We are a small service oriented business, and we want to be the best at what we do. If that means banter, we'll do our best, if that means non-stop music, we'll do our best, if that means anything in between, we'll do our best.

                          Insights and incites by Notes.
                          Bob "Notes" Norton
                          Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                          Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
                          The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DeepEnd View Post
                            I can only reply from an audience perspective since praise bands don't tend to much patter, at least ours doesn't. First, keep it short. You're a musician, not a stand up comic. They're not there to listen to you tell jokes. Second, keep it relevant or at least interesting. If there's a funny, or at least interesting, short story about how you wrote one of your originals or the first time you played a specific cover that's coming up, tell it, not what you had for breakfast. Third, keep it appropriate. A couple of years ago my wife and I went with another couple to hear the Melvin Turnage Band (R&B, Motown) and at one point the gal fronting the band told a long story about getting laid in the car right before a gig. Frankly, I did not need to hear that.
                            never mind all that personal opinion stuff, do you recall any of the details about the singers story?
                            Originally posted by isaac42;n32240445

                            Voltan is correct.

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                            • #15
                              its probably stream-able from the bands FB page...

                              and who says you're not a stand-up comic? If whatever you do on the stage makes the audience react positively, then it works.

                              For instance, Tuesday night, our blues jam hosting gig, after the third song, I said ' Those of you familiar with our band may have noticed we are missing one of our founding members; Could we have a moment of silence? No, he's not dead, he's on a week long cruise with his wife...'. It got a good laugh...but that is the other piece, it can't just be random, it really has to relate, in the moment.
                              Last edited by daddymack; 07-07-2019, 05:43 PM.
                              "We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminate period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

                              Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally used up and worn out, shouting '...man, what a ride!'

                              "The greatness of a man is not in how much wealth he acquires, but in his integrity and his ability to affect those around him positively" ~Bob Marley

                              Solipsism is the new empiricism. -Alan Burdick

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