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my new mixer has a PFL button - can someone explain it's function?

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  • my new mixer has a PFL button - can someone explain it's function?

    I've used a Peavey Unity 2000 board for years (15?) and for a classic rock band that only runs vocals through it, it has been a good basic board. I had the chance to buy a never-used Peavey RQ-2318 at a very good price so I picked it up.

    I read through the manual, and the only function I can detect for the PFL circuit is setting the channel gains. Does it do anything else? Am I missing something? What does PFL stand for?

    I read this thread but it doesn't quite go far enough . . . . .
    http://acapella.harmony-central.com/showthread.php?2816338-0db&highlight=PFL

    Thanks
    "Those that beat their swords into plowshares usually end up doing the plowing for those that kept their swords" - Ben Franklin

  • #2
    PFL is "Pre-Fader Listen"

    It's like a "solo" button. If you have headphones plugged into the headphone jack, when you hit the PFL on a channel, that channel gets routed directly to the headphones so you can listen for any problems on that channel. Also, it routes that channel to the output meter so you can check the level of the input signal and adjust the channel preamp gain. It has no effect on the output mix.

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    • #3
      Congratulation on the mixer I used a RQ-2318 for years and served me well.
      Mogwix pretty much nailed the description what PFL is.

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      • #4
        PFL is "Pre-Fader Listen"

        It's like a "solo" button. If you have headphones plugged into the headphone jack, when you hit the PFL on a channel, that channel gets routed directly to the headphones so you can listen for any problems on that channel. Also, it routes that channel to the output meter so you can check the level of the input signal and adjust the channel preamp gain. ***It has no effect on the output mix.***


        ***It has no effect on the output mix.***
        Just to add. Of course they mean with your fader all the way down or off when the pfl is selected.
        As Mogwix stated you can push the PFL button and use the main meter system to set your input gain. Its very handy on boards that don't have meters for each channel. As the night goes on you can check your inputs by just selecting the PFL button.

        Some boards have both.

        PFL or pre fade listen.
        AFL or After Fader Listen.

        One thing that you may want to look for in the manual or check out for your self. Find if the PFL selection feeds your meter BEFORE or AFTER the eq section. It may be worded Post eq / pre fade. Or pre eq, pre fade.

        If its not listed in the manual you can check it yourself. Connect a cd/mp3 etc. sound source to a channel. PFL the channel with the eq set flat and run the gain up until you have level showing on your meters. Say -15dbs as an example. Now turn up the bass or low eq on your channel up a lot. If the meters go up the PFL is monitoring post gain , post eq. If the meters don't change then its post gain but pre eq/fader.

        If its pre eq/fader be sure to keep a rough idea how much your boosting or cuting in the eq section. If you add 10 dbs of eq gain at 100hz for the bass drum then your meter is showing 10 dbs less in level then the true total gain stage of the channel. (roughly)
        The reverse of course if your turning down a lot in your channel eq section.

        Dookietwo

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        • #5
          As stated the PFL function can be used to set gain and to check on channel status (AFL is useful here as well). Although headphones are handy when using this function, it can also be used without assuming it's showing up on your meters.

          When I'm playing guitar on a small stage, my specialty is kicking my guitar mic out of place. Often I'll catch it and put it back in place, but if not then a tech can use PFL/AFL and headphones to determine what's up - especially if the sight lines aren't clear.

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          • 6Imzadi
            6Imzadi commented
            Editing a comment
            Try a different mic placement solution. Or, consider direct.

          • Shaster
            Shaster commented
            Editing a comment
            Well although I was serious (all those years ago) it was also kind of tongue in cheek, and more the techs problem than mine. When I "self mic" I make sure it's not an issue. Actually, 90 to 95% of my guitar gigs are with amp shields, so knocking the mic is not a problem anymore - but falling mics still are. Just over a week ago, a tech came up to my amp and looked a little perplexed. The guitar mic had come off the stand and was lying on the floor, but there was a big wooden amp shield in front so he couldn't see what had happened. That's why I use plexi amp shields.

        • #6
          Hello .....my name is harsh.....i have peavey 20usb.....can anyone teach me how to on efx to the monitors ?

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