Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

differences between DX7 and DX7 mk2.

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    1) It's a "daughterboard" that adds a small "operating system" into the DX thru the ROM socket. Externally all you see is a different display in the LCD screen with MANY more menu options. Existing DX buttons become multi-functional and you just haveto learn your way around. It takes a little getting used to, but it's really not that bad. You need the E! software to get it up and running.

    2) It looks like a daughterboard. Roughly 3" wide and about 7" long.

    3) Standard printed circuit board with Grey Matter rom and support chips and interconnecting cables coming off of it.

    4) It plugs into the ROM slot for the stock DX voice ROM. Screws in tight via longer screws that hold the daughterboard thru the motherboard and into the DX chassis.

    As many DX7's as there still are out there a reverse-engineered re-release could be interesting(more up to date features!!??). And yes, in some cases stability was indeed an issue, but when they worked they worked great.

    Take a look here:http://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Keyboard+And+MIDI/product/Yamaha/DX-7+FD+Grey+Matter+E!/10/1

    Comment


    • #17
      This bad boy comes with a preconfigured profile for complete DX7 Sysex control: http://www.waveidea.com/en/products/bitstream_3x/index.php

      Comment


      • #18
        When it comes to real-time control of parameter via midi, the original DX7 is about worthless. I you change the sound parameter values during a note, the sound will stutter. The DX7II, hovever, will handle it just fine. With the control panel I use, I can routinely adjust several parameter values at once without any problems.

        The only thing you have to watch out for is sending too much data at once. If you shove a whole bunch of data to the DX7II full bore, it will lock up due to a buffer overflow, as it can't actually process the data as fast as the midi channel can shovel it in.

        It's truly an unbelievable feeling when you start playing that beast with real-time controls. It ends up being a very dynamic instrument, and pretty easy to learn the basics of.
        "I'm more concerned about the maggots in the bedroom than about the catfight in the kitchen!"


        http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/5...8840smljn3.jpg

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Yoozer View Post
          <BLOCKQUOTE><TABLE border="1"><TBODY><TR><TD>The DX7S has WORSE audio quality than the DX7? I think not...</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></BLOCKQUOTE><BR /><BR />The original DX7 sounds noisier and not as clean (I've seen people use the term "warmer" for this, go figure) as the II, which has better converters. If you like that, then you should get the mk1 or the TX7.
          *Hello from the next decade*

          I think people use the word 'warm', to describe sounds coloured with artifacts. Maybe a bit of character leaves a warm feeling? E.g., the perception vinyl is 'warm', when it's actually missing the bottom end present in a high quality digital signal.

          Comment

          Working...
          X