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  • #16
    One last note before I go for good: yes, I did overlook that part of the basic waveforms in the manual. But having used synths for more than 4 decades and currently owning 4 other synths, I admittedly did not read the manual as fully as a novice might; I didn't need to since I usually delete the presets of a synth before using it & then set about creating my own sound programs. With this particular keyboard it simply wasn't easily noticed by myself that the basic waveforms are there. Being eager to hear the sounds i was expecting to from this new Casio, i definitely did wire it up into the studio and jump into sound modeling very quickly, because I was quite eager to use it, having waited since it was announced to finally own it. Me overlooking the basic waveforms has no bearing whatsoever on what this keyboard can do, or about the quality of its presets straight from the box. It is what it is. Maybe it was the layout of this unit plus me feeling like I didn't have to read every word of the manual that caused me to overlook the basic waveforms, i dont know, but as far as manipulating the preset waveforms I had no misunderstanding whatsoever about the sound results that came from this product. That's all. Bye bye.

    Comment


    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by voice of truth
      View Post

      I obviously have acknowledged my oversight of the basic waveforms being included, and I have no doubt that you will find that this product matches your goals and abilities. But as I mentioned from the beginning people such as yourself take these issues way too seriously. There is no reason for personal attacks now or later. Everyone has a right to an opinion, and sometimes that means being wrong sometime, such as my overlooking the basi waveforms. But that does not render my opinion invalid, but go ahead and attack; it is what I expected. Just know you will be fighting alone, as I am going back to more productive matters....




      I'm sorry if you interpreted what I said as a personal attack; it was an attack on your opinions, some of which were based on wrong assumptions. But I also didn't appreciate what I felt was a condescending attitude toward other musicians - you're welcome to attack Casio all you want, with accusations of deceptiveness, but when you start portraying the people who frequent this forum as gullible people who want something for nothing and fall prey to advertising gimmicks, I get both upset and protective.



      You specifically referenced cheating honest men, "preying" on customers who expect "something for nothing," and about how if something seems too good to be true, it probably is. That sounded like an unwarranted attack to me, and a major leap from "I don't like the sounds" to a company preying on people.



      I am not here to fight anyone, but given the above, coupled with making fundamental errors in judging what the unit can do, I felt the need to respond in kind. You said "Everyone has a right to an opinion, and sometimes that means being wrong sometime, such as my overlooking the basic waveforms. But that does not render my opinion invalid." Well actually, if an opinion is based on something that's factually wrong, yes, it does invalidate at least a significant part of that opinion.



      What it doesn't invalidate is your opinion that you don't like the sound quality. Fine. My opinion is that editing sounds can make them sound the way you want, and during the course of this review, people will find out about the editing functionality so that they can make a more informed decision about whether or not the XW-P1 will serve their needs.



      Finally, please understand that I have been doing forums for musicians continually since 1995. Over that time, certain warning signals go off that indicate "agenda!" A single post from someone who's never been involved with a community, adopts the name "Voice of Truth," then goes into a highly negative critique of a piece of gear that in parts is factually wrong does indeed incorporate those warning signs. However, I am willing to accept that this is coincidence, and just because your post has the same vibe as posts made in the past that DID have an agenda doesn't mean you aren't sincere in your comments.
      The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

      Comment


      • #18
        To end this detour on a lighter note, here's a comment about manuals.



        When I was working at Electronic Musician magazine the first time around, we had a review from an author who was very critical of a piece of gear due to its lacking an essential feature. I agreed this was a serious oversight, and wanted to get the manufacturer's take on why they left it out. They were confused, and said "It's in there, look at page 105 of the manual." Well, they were right, it was in there.



        So I called the reviewer and told him the feature was in there all along, and was described very thoroughly in the manual. To which he said "Well, I didn't read the whole manual..."



        For some reason he wasn't asked to write any more reviews
        The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

        Comment


        • #19
          Voice- I guess Craig and I are both a bit puzzled by your post. Given your gear list, I'd like to know what was the reason you were interested in the XW-P1. What feautures compelled you to make the purchase? Since you say that you do a lot of programming I'm also trying to understand what editing features you used? Did you download our Mac or PC editor?



          -Mike Martin

          Casio America Inc.
          -Mike Martin
          Casio America, Inc.

          Comment


          • #20
            Actually Voice, I have a question too because your stories aren't adding up. You said you were driving 200 miles round-trip to return it (I guess you didn't buy it at GC, there's gotta be one closer than that ) but then you said you were going to check out the area of oscillator sounds more. So, have you decided to return it or hold on to it? Did you consider being able to choose individual oscillator sounds sufficient reason to hold on to it, despite your other complaints?









            Quote Originally Posted by voice of truth
            View Post

            One last note before I go for good: yes, I did overlook that part of the basic waveforms in the manual. But having used synths for more than 4 decades and currently owning 4 other synths, I admittedly did not read the manual as fully as a novice might; I didn't need to since I usually delete the presets of a synth before using it & then set about creating my own sound programs.




            So let me get this straight: You delete all the presets of a synth before using it, yet judged the XW-P1's sound on the presets because you listened to them for several hours ("After cringing following several hours of hearing certain presets..."). If you didn't like them, why did you persist in listening to them for several hours when your standard procedure is to delete them and create your own?








            With this particular keyboard it simply wasn't easily noticed by myself that the basic waveforms are there.



            If you're in a preset, hit the Edit button. Choose the Waveform from the Oscillator Block. If you can figure out an easier workflow, I'm sure Casio would love to hear your thoughts.








            Me overlooking the basic waveforms has no bearing whatsoever on what this keyboard can do



            Then why did you say you were going to re-visit that area, once you found out you could indeed choose from a huge variety of basic synth waveforms? I thought you were returning it?








            ...or about the quality of its presets straight from the box



            I thought you deleted synth presets before using them. That would imply you're not happy with the presets that come with synthesizers. So why did you reserve continued listening to presets you don't like with the XW-P1 but eliminate them immediately with other synths?








            Maybe it was the layout of this unit plus me feeling like I didn't have to read every word of the manual that caused me to overlook the basic waveforms



            I didn't have to read the manual to find the oscillator. I was in a preset and I wanted to edit it, so I kinda assumed that I should hit "Edit." Then a field showed up in the display that said "Oscillator block." I figured it would let me choose the oscillator sound. It did.








            ...as far as manipulating the preset waveforms I had no misunderstanding whatsoever about the sound results that came from this product.



            I respectfully submit that if you didn't hit the Edit button, you probably didn't figure out how to manipulate the sound.








            That's all. Bye bye.



            Bye! Back to the pro review. My apologies to everyone else for spending time on someone who can't get his stories straight.
            The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

            Comment


            • #21
              Being a piano player I was looking for my next step so I couldn't decide whether it would be a Moog or a ROMpler or a Hammond sound. For months I looked but sat on the fence not knowing what type of sound I was willing to throw money down to explore. I was also on a shoe string budget. I am glad I sat as long as I did because I feel I got all three of those afformentioned sounds PLUS a step sequencer all in one device. This machine is amazing, I've seriously impressed some of the more accomplished musicians amongst my friends and family, so much so they've starting calling me Phil from Groundhog Day "Wow Phil, I didn't know you could play space stretching, ear splitting, hypersonic synth?" I am beyond happy with this purchase.
              Time is precious - you can't buy it or take it with you when you're gone - don't waste it.

              Comment


              • #22






                Quote Originally Posted by gneissnfunky
                View Post

                Being a piano player I was looking for my next step so I couldn't decide whether it would be a Moog or a ROMpler or a Hammond sound. For months I looked but sat on the fence not knowing what type of sound I was willing to throw money down to explore. I was also on a shoe string budget. I am glad I sat as long as I did because I feel I got all three of those afformentioned sounds PLUS a step sequencer all in one device. This machine is amazing, I've seriously impressed some of the more accomplished musicians amongst my friends and family, so much so they've starting calling me Phil from Groundhog Day "Wow Phil, I didn't know you could play space stretching, ear splitting, hypersonic synth?" I am beyond happy with this purchase.




                As a piano player, what do you think of the piano sounds? I'd be interested in your take.
                The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

                Comment


                • #23
                  If I had listened to all those people like voice of truth, who were bagging the Casio ctk7000 while I was trawling the web, I would never have purchased it.



                  I took Craig's word that I would be impressed and purchased the unit without even checking one out because I live 500km from the nearest music store, and for the $500 AUD, delivered, that I paid for the unit, it was a steal. And Craig's review of the Zoom R8, made my mind up to get that unit, before the ctk7000, and his writings were true to the point, so I had no hesitation to get the ctk7000.



                  I also have at least a dozen synth keyboards/modules in storage. Roland, Korg, Yamaha, Ensoniq, Emu etc etc. and the ctk7000 is right up there with them in my opinion.



                  You might be thinking why do I need another keyboard, well I now live a very frugal western world existence in the country, powered by a very small solar system, so I am building up a small collection of recording gear, that requires very little power through the inverter and can also be operated from batteries. Who knows what I am going to do with the other stuff, they consume too much power, time will tell.



                  To get back to the point, I truly believe that if Craig Anderton says a piece of musical equipment works and sounds good, I know it will, and I know that when I purchase my Casio XW-P1 it will complete my low powered and portable studio, that can be all run from one 80watt solar panel.



                  Regards to all,

                  Chris

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I would be interested in seeing your solar power rig!
                    Good deals with - Yarbicus, CBH5150, BozzofAngels, Alvin Wilson, Harris Quinn

                    Oh, but you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because some watery tart threw a sword at you.

                    Comment


                    • #25






                      Quote Originally Posted by electrochrisso
                      View Post

                      To get back to the point, I truly believe that if Craig Anderton says a piece of musical equipment works and sounds good, I know it will, and I know that when I purchase my Casio XW-P1 it will complete my low powered and portable studio, that can be all run from one 80watt solar panel.



                      Regards to all,

                      Chris




                      I greatly appreciate the props, and I really do try to probe deep into all the gear I try. However, so much of this is subjective...I mean, I like Nine Inch Nails and Antonio Soler harpsichord concertos, so I'm not exactly a "one-size-fits-all" guy!



                      My goal in reviews is not to say "I like it" or "I don't like it," but instead, to try and describe something with such accuracy that the reader can decide whether it would fit THEIR needs or not - because it's all about the right fit. Of course, if there are things I particularly like or don't like about a unit, I'll mention those. But again, I try not to attach too many value judgements.



                      For example, I personally find the lack of an expression pedal jack on the PW-X1 a significant omission. But, that's me; other people might not care. So I mentioned that it's not there, but also described how you could interface an expression pedal with the PW-X1. So, not having an expression pedal jack isn't a deal-breaker for me, because there's a workaround thanks to the XW-P! having a 5-pin MIDI input jack.



                      Also, bear in mind that like M-Audio's Venom, the XW-P1 is right up my alley in terms of music-making. I like step sequencers, huge layered sounds, a simple but deep operating system, and the like. If my main goal with synthesizers was to have a Yamaha acoustic instrument ROM set, I wouldn't diss the PW-X1 for not having it - I'd play the Motif



                      That said, I've come nowhere close to finding out the full capabilities of the XW-P1. For example, while checking out the "conventional" patches, I was frankly surprised at how much I liked the pianos, including the electric piano which had really great velocity sensitivity and expressiveness. The violin and cello - uh, not so much. However, I don't know how editable they are. If I can add some more control to them so the sustains aren't static, that will make a huge difference. And there are some surprises. I found a harp sound, and didn't care for it. But then I found a second harp, and I'd use that one any time.



                      So, there's still much to discover. One thing I think I can say with certainty is that you really do have to read the manual to figure out what's going on. There are a whole lot of options I haven't seen on other synthesizers, so it really doesn't matter how much experience you've had, you need to treat the XW-P1 as something new to discover. Which is what we'll be doing here
                      The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

                      Comment


                      • #26






                        Quote Originally Posted by Anderton
                        View Post

                        As a piano player, what do you think of the piano sounds? I'd be interested in your take.




                        Hahaha, you know I've had this synth for almost a month and have yet to explore the piano sounds - having way to much fun with the other features - way to take me off guard . However after your post I put my headphones on and played a few of my favorite piano tunes on the XW-P1. Let me start by saying I have a Privia, an older basic model one (PX-110), and am consistently blow away by the piano sound from that instrument - my neighbor has a parlor grand piano and I can honestly say the Privia sound is insanely realistic (note, I am not claiming to have a gift for analyzing the true sound and timbre of an instrument, just giving my opinion). So, back to what I think of the piano sounds, well, lets just say I'm gonna keep the Privia as my bottom tier. It seems to lack the "meat" I get from the Privia and a real piano, maybe what I'm trying to say is it's "light on fullness"? Personally, the individual PCM sounds were not the reason I bought this synth and the piano sounds are not a complete wash for me because I would easily use them as a layer for a hex sound, which is really how I've been using the PCMs. Personally, I feel a little bad having said all this hoping this won't deter anyone from buying this instrument because this has been the most fun I've had with my clothes on in quite some time. Been getting some real nice compliments on my beats and sounds and the best part is that it all happens in front of their eyes - no hours of prep in front of a DAW. Lastly, what's really cool is usually at one point in a jam my own jaw drops and I stand there in disbelief at the complexity, depth, and awesomeness of the sound - this synth consistently amazes me!
                        Time is precious - you can't buy it or take it with you when you're gone - don't waste it.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I agree the PW-X1 is more about synthesis than being a "ROMpler." But like you, I don't want to give the wrong idea. I really do like the electric pianos, the choir sounds, some of the brass, etc. As to acoustic pianos, if I want a really good piano sound I avoid hardware synths and depend on virtual instruments that eat up Gigabytes of memory (e.g., like Synthogy and some of the Native Instrument pianos for Kontakt). That said, though, I think that in a live performance situation the PW-X1 acoustic piano sounds would more than do the job.



                          Also I see you've found that the hex layering is what makes the PW-X1 stand out . If you're into layering PCM sounds with the synthesized waveforms, I think you're well on your way to getting the most out of this synth.
                          The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

                          Comment


                          • #28






                            Quote Originally Posted by deanmass
                            View Post

                            I would be interested in seeing your solar power rig!




                            No worries deanmass, what I will do is post a new thread on 'Craig Anderton's Sound, Studio, and Stage' , of what I am currently running, with a few photos of the setup (minus the XW-P1 for the moment) that I have been using for about four years now.

                            It might take me a couple of days to get it together, so keep your eye out.








                            Also, bear in mind that like M-Audio's Venom, the XW-P1 is right up my alley in terms of music-making. I like step sequencers, huge layered sounds, a simple but deep operating system, and the like.



                            Same here, that is one of the many main reasons why I want to get the XW-P1, so along with the ctk7000, Zoom-R8/Condenser Mic/Guitar, Netbook/Software/VSTi plugins, I can have an incredible variety of music creation possibilities at an incredible price and also run this all on my puny solar system.



                            Sorry for sidetracking this thread a little Craig, this will be my last words (unless I have a direct question about the unit), and I cant wait until you post some of the audio sonic capabilities of the XW-P1.

                            Comment


                            • #29






                              Quote Originally Posted by electrochrisso
                              View Post

                              Sorry for sidetracking this thread a little Craig, this will be my last words (unless I have a direct question about the unit), and I cant wait until you post some of the audio sonic capabilities of the XW-P1.




                              Not a sidetrack at all!!! I never would have thought to mention the XW-P1's suitability as the centerpiece of a solar-powered studio, but I think that's a pretty bright (get it? "bright"?) idea.



                              I'll see if I have six D cells somewhere so I can verify Casio's spec of 425mA current drain when using the AC adapter. They also spec a battery life of about 35 hours with alkaline batteries, so under half an amp seems about right.
                              The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Well, I found six D cells. The current drain varies between about 240 and 260mA, which is really very good. I tried to do worst-case by turning on all the step sequencer LEDs and such, but it never hit more than 260mA. So, it seems the XW-P1 would be eminently suitable for solar power.
                                The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

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