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  • #46
    Got my Gilmore Jr. kit back in August. Got nothing but good things to say about it and about Richard Guy's customer service. The kit was easy to build, thanks to the clear instructions and quality components, but I still had a few questions...and Rich was very prompt and thorough in answering them.

    I've since added the V mod and the 2-watt mod; both serve my needs to a T.

    Rich also helped me acquire a pair of Weber speakers for this amp; unfortunately, I haven't been able to afford the materials to build the cabinets yet. Been running it through a 2x12 cab and it sounds GOOD. I expect great results when I get the 2x8, 16 ohm cab put together.

    I rate this:
    I not only resent the allegation, I resent the alligator!

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Scott Glover
      Why not just buy a Pod


      I personally don't like the tone of a Pod. The digital recreation of analog tones just don't sound as good.

      Comment


      • #48
        anybody care to elaborate on why the Cold Heat tool just isn't suited well? would the newer Cold Heat Plus do the trick a little better? as you can tell I haven't soldered much...
        Wants:
        16 ohm V30's and/or 8 ohm G12T-75's
        Has:
        Diezel Herbert
        RedBear mk120
        '67 SF Bandmaster
        Traynor YBA-1 (lower wattage version)
        Rivera Suprema 55 (on its way)
        Mesa oversized 4x12
        Early Mesa Mark series 4x12
        G-Flex 2x12
        Epi Elitist '61 Reissue w/nailbomb in bridge
        Ibanez S prestige
        Am Std. Strat w/Maple board w/ BK Mule in the Bridge soon...
        Greco ES-355 clone
        Boss RC20XL
        DOD YJM (modded by a forumite to 250+ specs)
        Ibanez DL5
        Z.Vex Ooh Wah 2 (for Sale)

        Comment


        • #49
          Sorry for the delay, let's continue.

          If you look at the last photo I posted, you can see that the components have been soldered to the turret board. That's your next step. It's really not difficult, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind:

          First of all, when applying more than one component that attaches to the same turret point, it's usually best to solder all of them at once. Just wrap all of the components 1/2 way around the turret post, and then solder them all at once. Then use the side cutters to remove any excess length of wire from the components, as close to the turret as you can get. You'll probably find it easiest to install everything if you start at one side of the turret board and work your way across the board to the opposite side.

          Another thing to be careful of is getting the orientation of any polarized parts correct. Again, all of the polarized parts, such as the black with blue striped capacitors and the diodes (the components at the far right side of the board in the picture above) are seperately bagged in the kit, and clearly marked on the components and in the instructions to help you know which way to install them. For electronics vets, this is simple stuff, but if you've never built anything like this before, you'll appreciate the extra thought that went into seperating these parts in an effort to make things easier for you. Getting the orientation of polarized parts is crucial - install these parts backwards / "reversed" and your amp isn't going to function properly.

          This is a good spot in the review to make a little confession. If you're an old timer like me, then you might have problems with close distance vision. Yup, I confess - I use reading glasses these days... but even with them, I sometimes had difficulty reading resistor color codes. Your multimeter can come in handy there... just set it to measure resistance, and rather than having to struggle and squint to make sure you've got the colors (and thus the value) figured out correctly, stick the meter's probes on each wire end of the resistor, and you'll get the value displayed in big numbers on your meter. That's one reason I like digital multimeters. Just be aware that resistors have a tolerance range - IOW, the actual value of the resistor when measured with a meter may not be exactly what is called for in the instructions, but it should be within a certain range - +/-2% or whatever, depending on the tolerance. So if you use a meter to help you sort through the resistors and check their values, don't be concerned that they're not dead on exact to the schematic. A good work light and maybe a magnifying glass can also be helpful when trying to use tired old eyes to see fine details. And when all else fails, give Rich a call. Again, I confess - I had to do this on two parts of one of the two kits (I just couldn't make out the markings) and Rich was more than helpful with it.

          Make sure you double check your work as you go along. "Measure twice, cut once" is good advice for electronics as well as carpentry... Just go slow and make sure you're using the right parts in the right place. If you're an inexperienced builder, once you have everything mounted to the turret board and have double checked everything, it's a good time to take a break.
          **********

          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
          - George Carlin

          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by FWAxeIbanez
            anybody care to elaborate on why the Cold Heat tool just isn't suited well? would the newer Cold Heat Plus do the trick a little better? as you can tell I haven't soldered much...


            I wrote a few general comments and opinions about the Cold Heat soldering tools - you can find them near the bottom of page two (second post from the bottom) of this thread.
            **********

            "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
            - George Carlin

            "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
            - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

            "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
            - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

            Comment


            • #51
              yes you sure can... how did I miss that? well, I guess I'll go run by and dig around in my grandpa's garage, he had a ton of soldering irons around...
              Wants:
              16 ohm V30's and/or 8 ohm G12T-75's
              Has:
              Diezel Herbert
              RedBear mk120
              '67 SF Bandmaster
              Traynor YBA-1 (lower wattage version)
              Rivera Suprema 55 (on its way)
              Mesa oversized 4x12
              Early Mesa Mark series 4x12
              G-Flex 2x12
              Epi Elitist '61 Reissue w/nailbomb in bridge
              Ibanez S prestige
              Am Std. Strat w/Maple board w/ BK Mule in the Bridge soon...
              Greco ES-355 clone
              Boss RC20XL
              DOD YJM (modded by a forumite to 250+ specs)
              Ibanez DL5
              Z.Vex Ooh Wah 2 (for Sale)

              Comment


              • #52
                Yes, Soldering Irons, pencil type, 30 ~ 40 Watts. 60/40 (Tin/Lead %) or 63/37 Solder. No flux. No soldering gun types as they inject potentials that can damage some electronic parts.
                Best regards,
                Rich
                www.guytronix.com

                Comment


                • #53
                  Okay, next up is the wiring for the transformers, tube sockets and chassis mounted parts. On this step you will want to plan things out a little bit first, before doing the soldering. Once again, the manual defiitely points this out.

                  Notice that some of the wires in the picture above are "twisted". That's helpful for reducing noise, and the manual points out which wires have got to be twisted (the green wires going to the tube sockets in the picture above), as well as suggesting what other wires you may also want to twist. Just be careful once again not to pull on the wires near the transformers. Holding the wires near where they come through the chassis holes with one hand while twisting with the other will prevent you from twisting or pulling on the wires at the transformers.

                  Leave yourself plenty of wire to reach the places you need to get them to. And again, give some thought to the routing, and plan things out before you start cutting wire and soldering so that you can bundle and tie wrap the appropriate wires together for a nice clean build.

                  One thing that I noticed was omitted from the manuals is any mention of the "extra" wires from the power transformer. That's going to confuse some new builders, and it is something that Guytronix should consider correcting in the next edition of the manual. Just cut the wire ends off evenly (without stripping), apply some heatshrink tubing over the ends and bundle them seperately.

                  Another thing you may have a bit of trouble with is some of the chassis mounted star grounding points. The tabs all sit pretty flat, making it difficult to thread the wires through the holes. No big deal - just pull the nut off and gently bend the tab ends up a little bit with a couple pairs of pliers... or you can use a flathead screwdriver to bend the tips upwards a bit if you prefer. In either case, make sure the nut is tightened firmly to insure nothing comes loose and gives you grounding problems.
                  **********

                  "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                  - George Carlin

                  "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                  - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                  "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                  - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by alcohol


                    I personally don't like the tone of a Pod. The digital recreation of analog tones just don't sound as good.


                    I don't either and I own one, but I bet those amps sound very good

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Phil's recommendations are valid regarding the extra primary transformer wires. The extra wires are for;

                      100 VAC
                      120 VAC
                      220 VAC
                      240 VAC

                      These different value windings/wires are to support any Country's AC voltage as we ship and support our kits World-wide.

                      Yes, select the wire that matches your Country AC voiltage and cut the rest back an inch or so, wrapping each of them in shrink-wrap or electrical tape. The color of each wire and it's AC volt application is defined in the manual ;^)

                      Guytronix will put a line in the manual that describes what to do with the unused primary VAC wires. Thanks, Phil, for making the documentation bullet-proof
                      Best regards,
                      Rich
                      www.guytronix.com

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Richard Guy


                        Now, I KNOW you wanted to say "idiot-proof" but I can see where that might not be the most professional way to describe your customers!

                        I definitely plan on picking up one of these kits sometime in the near future, so please let us know when you see a price increase on the horizon. I would've bought one earlier but I'm already backed-up with "projects" as it is and don't really need another one sitting around cluttering up the house. Do you think current prices will hold 'til, say, summertime-ish?
                        >>>Click here for my list of smooooov deals!

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Hello Rog951,

                          Thanks for your understanding. I almost used the old Navy term, "Sailor-Proof".

                          Funny you should ask about a price increase. We just had one. The Kit has been at the same price for over 38 months. Increases in component, chassis, G-10 material and transformer iron drove the modest increase. If you send an email to support@guytronix.com with this request, I'll honor the original price for 45 days. None of the accessories were increased.
                          Best regards,
                          Rich
                          www.guytronix.com

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            oh man... I want to build one of these so bad it hurts, but money I was counting on fell through, so now I'm on the outside looking in
                            Wants:
                            16 ohm V30's and/or 8 ohm G12T-75's
                            Has:
                            Diezel Herbert
                            RedBear mk120
                            '67 SF Bandmaster
                            Traynor YBA-1 (lower wattage version)
                            Rivera Suprema 55 (on its way)
                            Mesa oversized 4x12
                            Early Mesa Mark series 4x12
                            G-Flex 2x12
                            Epi Elitist '61 Reissue w/nailbomb in bridge
                            Ibanez S prestige
                            Am Std. Strat w/Maple board w/ BK Mule in the Bridge soon...
                            Greco ES-355 clone
                            Boss RC20XL
                            DOD YJM (modded by a forumite to 250+ specs)
                            Ibanez DL5
                            Z.Vex Ooh Wah 2 (for Sale)

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Richard Guy
                              Hello Rog951,

                              Thanks for your understanding. I almost used the old Navy term, "Sailor-Proof".
                              Thanks for not telling that I was one of the sailors who asked this very question!

                              I e-mailed Rich to ask about the extra xfmr leads. He answered within hours.
                              I not only resent the allegation, I resent the alligator!

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Hello Dano,

                                No, you were not one of those bad sailors! You question was very valid and helped make the current documentation better. You did a great job building the Kit. Thanks again for being my Customer.
                                Best regards,
                                Rich
                                www.guytronix.com

                                Comment

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