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Musicians' Should Look To Instrument Manufacturers To Replace Record Companies.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Idunno View Post
    Now the technology is shouldering aside traditional playing of real instruments.
    Like how the piano shouldered aside the clavichord...or lutes shouldered aside lyres

    Technology creates new types of instruments, whether you're considering the piano - which allowed keyboards to have dynamics - or adding frets to stringed instruments. The piano was a direct result of Prince Ferdinando de Medici's fascination with technology and mechanical devices, which caused him to recruit Cristofori as an inventor, who in turn created a keyboard that - unlike the harpsichord - could produce variations in volume. He worked constantly to improve the technology, right up to his death; note that even Bach dismissed early pianos, saying the higher notes were too soft to allow for a full dynamic range. It took technological improvements before he approved a piano's design a couple decades later. And even after its invention, the piano remained relatively unknown for at least a decade.

    The early pianos were high-tech, expensive monstrosities that were only the province of the wealthy, and it took more than a century before piano players acquired the same kind of status as rock stars and also, the technology became more affordable (which dovetailed with the rise of a middle class).

    As for shouldering aside traditional playing of real instruments, electric guitar sales are flat, not declining, while acoustic guitar sales have actually increased. So have electric pianos for the home, which brings your "real instruments" into economic reach for more people compared to having a grand or upright.

    Electronic instruments are in their infancy, like the piano was in 1700. Think of all the changes that were made to the piano to bring it to where it is today. To think that electronic instruments won't undergo a similar evolutionary curve over the next couple of centuries flies in the face of the history of all musical instruments. Are you aware of something like the Roli keyboard? It allows for exceptional expressiveness when teamed with electronic sounds, while carrying on the legacy of technical innovation which has always been a part of keyboard development.

    It's not my fault if technology not only provides new tools for your so-called "real" musicians to use, but also makes it easier for people to get into playing and enjoying music. People who are into music don't stop with what they start with, any more than guitar players are still playing the 3/4-sized nylon guitar on which they first learned. As I've mentioned before, many DJs have found DJing to be the "gateway drug" into wanting to learn more about music and so they start playing traditional instruments. More and more EDM groups are incorporating traditional instruments into what they do; check out the videos I did at IMS on Harmony Central's YouTube channel.

    How can anyone have a problem with people undergoing a transition from casual hobbyist to serious musician? We all gotta start somewhere. I see no downside to making it easier to get started, especially when the benefits allow further refinement of the tools that your so-called "real" musicians can use.
    The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Idunno View Post

      The art of making music got watered down dramatically when it was subjected to the visual aspect of ratings. I couldn't believe it when that happened but it did and music at large lost at least one man's respect that I know of. That spelled the end of traditional musicianship and the beginning of the sacred video for marketing music purposes. Traditional concerts also suffered the loss of borderline concert goers. Remove the video component of music - impossible at this juncture - and it will return to it's core aspect of sound alone. Technology, once again, serves to dehumanize another aspect of the arts in life by the hands of a few profiteers. It has already displaced the traditional rendering methods of fine and commercial arts to the sterile environment of electrons. It has dehumanized interpersonal relationships with the cell phone and texting technologies. Hell, even the word "texting" is not found in this site's lexicon (yet). Now the technology is shouldering aside traditional playing of real instruments. I think the whole of technology will one day render a pallet devoid of the true colors of humanization and we have champions of that in the form of the Andertons to thank for it. Good job, fellers. Keep up the good work.
      What you're arguing against is entertainers taking advantage of new ways to entertain. There are still plenty of "pure" musicians with virtually no video aspect to what they do. Every decent size city has an orchestra and at least one concert series. Many even have guest instrumentalist coming in from all over the world. If that's not you're thing, there are festivals all over where people camp out all weekend and play old time and bluegrass music.

      It's also possible to have entertainers be damn good musicians. That's kind of how it's always been. If you think Mozart wouldn't have been at least as big of a douche on social media than Kayne West, you're as delusional.
      Last edited by rhino55; 11-16-2015, 09:29 AM.
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      • #18
        Originally posted by rhino55 View Post
        If you think Mozart wouldn't have been at least as big of a douche on social media than Kayne West, you're as delusional.
        Tweet-worthy!! And it's even less than 140 characters.

        The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Anderton View Post

          Tweet-worthy!! And it's even less than 140 characters.
          Ha

          This also seems fitting.

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