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Ban cell video at concerts? Of course! (Not?)

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  • #16
    There are certainly a variety of good and bad aspects to this modern trend. My $0.02:

    Yes, by allowing people to record and post your live performances on YouTube (and what not) you're losing some control over your IP and image marketing, but, on the other hand, you're getting enthusiastic marketing by fans essentially for free (the value of which can be quite high). The flip side is that if you're an ass on stage that night, it's going to live forever (and, in the modern day, walking off stage because people are recording could certainly be perceived as falling into that latter category -- be careful).

    It certainly depends on the type of act you're in, too. If you're Loreena McKennitt and you're doing some sort of auditorium show, a bunch of people moving around trying to get good shots or videos can be really distracting to the rest of the audience. The positive for that sort of fanbase is that they're likely to be much more receptive to the request, particularly if its phrased as benefiting the other members of the audience and not solely the band.

    On the other hand, look at the 183920137201 Steel Panther cellphone vids. Not only do they encourage people to do it (how many "bootleg" clips of them at a Hard Rock show exist on YouTube? Surely more than grains of sand on a beach), but they often acknowledge and participate in the phenomenon, because audience interaction is a big part of their live show.

    A long time ago, in high school, an older theater student (whose name has been lost to an atrophied neuron cluster) gave me a bit of advice that's stuck with me throughout my life with regards to live performances: It's not about you (the performer), it's about the audience. I think, to large extent, that advice applies with regards to this topic. Would I, personally, go to a show and spend any time taking pictures or recording video? No, not really, because it would interfere with my perception of being in the moment for that short amount of time. Are there *tons* of people who, having paid to come to that same show, want to preserve that experience in some sort of digital format? Yes, obviously, absolutely.

    Therefore, in my mind, as a performer, there's really no benefit to *me* in trying to enforce my way of experiencing a show on the many people who prefer to experience it another way.

    It's not dissimilar to the 90s and 2000s, where instead of embracing digital distribution, many large labels desperately clung to physical distribution. Can I understand why they did that? Sure, but they were still just "pissing into the ocean", instead of adapting and surfing the oncoming wave.
    Last edited by Nijyo; 09-12-2015, 09:44 AM.
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    • #17
      Thank you, thank you, thank you!

      This is one of my pet peeves. All those cell phones glaring back at me are one of several things that keep me from going to more concerts. I HATE it. I just want to run up and grab each and every phone and melt them on stage with a blowtorch, the inconsiderate, ego-maniacal morons!
      I hate phone dependency. I hate people who think more about themselves and their own little friends back home than they do about the music.
      You see someone holding up their phone at a concert and you'll see someone who doesn't give a chit about other people or about the band/fan connection. It's all about bragging rights back home. It's shallower than a mud puddle in June.
      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      "Faith ruled the Dark Ages."

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
        Maybe more bands should make their policies about pictures and taping more clear and announce them more prominently at their shows, as Brian alluded to.
        And then kick the offenders out, period.

        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        "Faith ruled the Dark Ages."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Mr. Hardgroove View Post
          Like most worthwhile discussions, there are at least two positions to be considered.
          1) The effects of cell phone vids on music/entertainment commerce (pro/con).
          2) How individuals in society choose to use advanced. technologies. Whether for the public good or for self-gratification or self-aggrandizement as touched on by Dendy’s observation.
          In my mind, the first one doesn't even come into play. I paid to see the band, not dozens of cell phones glaring at me in the darkness. If a band thinks videos are great to spread their message then screw them. I don't want to pay to see them. If they think that little about their fans who came to really SEE THE SHOW, then frankly, they suck too.

          The ONLY way that cameras at concerts is acceptable is either if they are all in the back row or if all cameras DO NOT EMIT ANY LIGHT and ARE NOT BLOCKING THE VIEW of anyone behind them (even one square inch of view).

          I swear, if I had a stick I'd hit them over the head with it.
          Did I mention that I hate phone addiction?
          Well, I do. Thanks for letting me get that off my chest.
          Last edited by Minning Around; 09-17-2015, 10:37 PM.
          -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          "Faith ruled the Dark Ages."

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Nijyo View Post
            There are certainly a variety of good and bad aspects to this modern trend. My $0.02:

            Yes, by allowing people to record and post your live performances on YouTube (and what not) you're losing some control over your IP and image marketing, but, on the other hand, you're getting enthusiastic marketing by fans essentially for free (the value of which can be quite high). The flip side is that if you're an ass on stage that night, it's going to live forever (and, in the modern day, walking off stage because people are recording could certainly be perceived as falling into that latter category -- be careful).

            It certainly depends on the type of act you're in, too. If you're Loreena McKennitt and you're doing some sort of auditorium show, a bunch of people moving around trying to get good shots or videos can be really distracting to the rest of the audience. The positive for that sort of fanbase is that they're likely to be much more receptive to the request, particularly if its phrased as benefiting the other members of the audience and not solely the band.

            On the other hand, look at the 183920137201 Steel Panther cellphone vids. Not only do they encourage people to do it (how many "bootleg" clips of them at a Hard Rock show exist on YouTube? Surely more than grains of sand on a beach), but they often acknowledge and participate in the phenomenon, because audience interaction is a big part of their live show.

            A long time ago, in high school, an older theater student (whose name has been lost to an atrophied neuron cluster) gave me a bit of advice that's stuck with me throughout my life with regards to live performances: It's not about you (the performer), it's about the audience. I think, to large extent, that advice applies with regards to this topic. Would I, personally, go to a show and spend any time taking pictures or recording video? No, not really, because it would interfere with my perception of being in the moment for that short amount of time. Are there *tons* of people who, having paid to come to that same show, want to preserve that experience in some sort of digital format? Yes, obviously, absolutely.

            Therefore, in my mind, as a performer, there's really no benefit to *me* in trying to enforce my way of experiencing a show on the many people who prefer to experience it another way.

            It's not dissimilar to the 90s and 2000s, where instead of embracing digital distribution, many large labels desperately clung to physical distribution. Can I understand why they did that? Sure, but they were still just "pissing into the ocean", instead of adapting and surfing the oncoming wave.
            Some bands think more about their band's success than about what their fans get out of your music. There's a difference. The former doesn't deserve success.

            If someone wants to preserve a concert then buy a damn DVD or Blu-ray. It should never be someone's right to do things at concerts that ruin the experience of others. Why in the hell venues put up with this is beyond me. God, those cell videos are so atrocious anyway that they aren't even worth watching. It's ridiculous on several levels. It's a symptom of a generation that has lost focus on what's important in life (in this case, being one with the music) and focus on what value they hold for strangers around them. It's all-about-me when it comes to cell phones at concerts. It's the rudest damn thing I've seen in recent times.

            And if you, as a band member, aren't just enough to enforce against the small minority, who so egregiously degrade the experience for a majority, then your band is not one worth seeing, IMO.
            Last edited by Minning Around; 09-17-2015, 11:00 PM.
            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            "Faith ruled the Dark Ages."

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            • Mr. Hardgroove
              Mr. Hardgroove commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Minning Around.
              I agree on on the surface and in depth.....

          • #21
            If I was a touring musician, I'd strike back at the smartphone videographers by:

            1) set up two large vertical screens. Project a live show from back stage, and EQ the final mix for that great smartphone audio quality, 300 Hz - 4kHz. (In other words, replicate the 'smart phone view' on stage)

            - OR -

            2) Blinding lights pointed at the audience.

            - OR -

            3) Randomly stop in the middle of a song, whip out your smart phone and tell the audience, "Sorry, I have to check facebook."

            Of course any of these indignities would be met with boos and howls of protests from entitled audience members.



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