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  • Here's the teac plan

    Tascam Japan began re-integrating the tan/orange color last year on the Japanese tascam web area. Teaser stuff. As I noted then.

    A non-working 38 was in the Anaheim namm booth 2018 for what seemed like simple nostalgia. What it (and other orphans) were really for was for discussion input.

    The ' classics reborn ' thing..complete with woodgrain...is the beginning of a tool-up. For various stuff. One item has appeared in the form of a hybrid product. The next items will work backwards, away from hybrid.

    While my pre-show namm walkthrough in a few weeks may reveal some nice, additional teac/tascam 2019 goodies, I'm convinced the 2020 show will be the one to bring on the teac smiles.

    Right on time, in the 36-48mo timeframe I've been predicting. By the way, teac guys kept popping in to that ballfinger display last month. And my studer contacts at Harman still say, "we don't know if the guys here wanna do it".

    1970.....2020. tan/orange...classics reborn. Tool-up.

    The others will follow.

    As always, I know nothing. I know no one. Never believe anything i claim to know. This thread will self-destruct in five seconds. Or not
    Last edited by bookumdano4; 11-25-2018, 01:12 PM.

  • #2
    interesting theory... I'm going to have to give this one some thought.
    **********

    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
    - George Carlin

    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

    Comment


    • #3
      You still read about artists who just don't give up the tape. Indie, old school sorts, Americana, etc. Some record just drums/bass on tape, the rest digi.

      A new unit that looks vibey and is better than the old units?...I bet there's a market there somewhere. Won't take the world by storm, but if vinyl can be a niche...why not tape?

      nat

      Comment


      • #4
        Recording The Masters (the folks that are the latest end-of-tail of Agfa, BASF, RMGI tape) just re-introduced newly made C-60 cassettes. I believe this is in support of the rumored resurgence of music distribution on cassette, but can an all-analog Portastudio be far behind?

        I totally missed the TASCAM booth at AES this year, and I know I was right next to where they were supposed to be. I assume that they were actually there, probably a pretty small display - but NAMM has been a bigger show for them for a good many years. But one thing that I noticed over the past couple of years is that after Jeff Laity got promoted to Big Chief, it's been harder to find a pro marketing manager at their show booths.
        --
        "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
        Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

        Comment


        • #5
          Mike, I thought Jeff was with Guitar Center - he used to be marketing mgr. at TASCAM, but I was under the impression he went to GC a year or two ago...

          **********

          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
          - George Carlin

          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

          Comment


          • #6
            Correct, Jeff went to Guitar Center. Probably why you don't hear talk about them going bankrupt any more
            The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

            Comment


            • #7
              As to the OP...is it still possible to buy reel-to-reel tape?
              The first 3 books in "The Musician's Guide to Home Recording" series are available from Hal Leonard and http://www.reverb.com. Listen to my music on http://www.YouTube.com/thecraiganderton, and visit http://www.craiganderton.com. Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                Tape availability? I equate those discussions to the "what are we gonna do now that hostess Twinkies are history?".

                The answer to the availability of hostess cupcakes was..... Just relax a few minutes and watch what happens.

                For those who didn't wait, there were always leftover hostess sno-balls to be had via eBay. Or places like like ATR....doesn't the T stand for hostess twinkies?

                As to the quiet nature of us teac.....in 1970, you had the initial spinoff tascam guys in marina del Rey (before the Montebello move) putting the pressure on Japan to fabricate what the us guys needed. ASAP...pronto...yesterday. stuff started flowing over in pieces and mdr/Montebello would assemble. Then, Japan understood what it had and ramped up production into overdrive.

                Now.... We're in a different era. Japan is navigating/directing this thing. Complete with hindsight and a keen awareness of brand-identification. Probably only 2 us guys know the plan and they're not exactly guys on the radar. Teac Japan sees the way into this thing clearly. Unlike in 1970.

                Imo.
                Last edited by bookumdano4; 11-26-2018, 12:35 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
                  Mike, I thought Jeff was with Guitar Center - he used to be marketing mgr. at TASCAM, but I was under the impression he went to GC a year or two ago...
                  That could explain why I haven't seen Jeff around. I know I saw him once or twice after Gibson bought TEAC. I guess he got while the gettin' was good.
                  --
                  "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                  Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Anderton View Post
                    As to the OP...is it still possible to buy reel-to-reel tape?
                    Yes - new from at least two sources, ATR Magnetics and Recording The Masters
                    --
                    "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                    Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Anderton View Post
                      As to the OP...is it still possible to buy reel-to-reel tape?
                      As Mike said, the answer is yes, but it's more expensive than ever. I used to pay about $140-150 a reel for 2" - now it's more like $320 per reel... so while buying a (used) 24 track reel to reel is now much cheaper, the tape is more expensive.

                      With the current low price of HDD's, you can get a drive and a backup for under a hundred bucks, or maybe a bit over, and have enough storage for a full album (easily), but you're going to pay $900+ for enough tape to do an album... is it any wonder why so many people don't bother with tape anymore?
                      **********

                      "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                      - George Carlin

                      "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                      - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                      "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                      - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

                        As Mike said, the answer is yes, but it's more expensive than ever. I used to pay about $140-150 a reel for 2" - now it's more like $320 per reel... so while buying a (used) 24 track reel to reel is now much cheaper, the tape is more expensive.
                        Ouch! No wonder only quirky people record on tape now. I used to buy 2" tape on hubs and don't recall paying much more than about $60 a reel, but I think it's been 20 years since I bought any.

                        With the current low price of HDD's, you can get a drive and a backup for under a hundred bucks, or maybe a bit over, and have enough storage for a full album (easily), but you're going to pay $900+ for enough tape to do an album... is it any wonder why so many people don't bother with tape anymore?
                        There are some who are using one reel to do a whole album by transferring tape tracks to a DAW for mixing. As long as you have A/D/A converters that are as good as clean analog - which isn't hard to do these days, that's a workable approach. Whether a Neve plug-in is as good a mixing on a Neve console is questionable, it's cheaper to take your hard drive to a studio with a Neve console and mix it there than to bring a car load of 2" tape and hope their tape deck is properly maintained.

                        5-10 years ago, you could buy a 2" tape machine for a song, but by now, most of them, and even 1/4"-1/2" AG-440s, have been either bought up, canibalized for parts, or destroyed. At this fall's AES, there was a nicely refurbished MCI JH-110 showing for $5,000. If you could still find a 24-track Ampex MM1200 for a couple of grand it would probably need a lot of maintenance before it's good for anything more than a signal mangler.

                        Eight or ten years ago, a small group of really analog-smart people including Mike Spitz and John French had plans to manufacturer a new 2" 24-track tape recorder. When they figured that they couldn't possibly sell any at what it would cost, they scaled back and started thinking about a 1/2" 2-track, but eventually abandoned that plan for the same reason - cost.

                        So it's highly unlikely that we'll see a new analog reel-to-reel multitrack from TASCAM any time soon, but then bookemdano seems to come up with some inside information now and then.
                        --
                        "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                        Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The decks aren’t as plentiful as they used to be, but there are still quite a few out there. There is an A80 on Reverb for under $5k, and an A827 for under $15k... and someone was telling me about a JH24 for under $5k just the other day... Vintage King has one for $9k listed right now....

                          And for anyone considering making a new analog machine, that is a problem. They have to compete with those prices, which I honestly don’t think is possible to do and turn a profit.
                          **********

                          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                          - George Carlin

                          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MikeRivers View Post
                            There are some who are using one reel to do a whole album by transferring tape tracks to a DAW for mixing. As long as you have A/D/A converters that are as good as clean analog - which isn't hard to do these days, that's a workable approach.
                            We used to track to 2" and then transfer (or send it to the DAW in near real time by monitoring off the playback head) straight to Pro Tools for edits and overdubs - that's still a somewhat popular approach out here in LA, but you see it being used less and less as time goes on. I guess I'm just old-school, but if I'm going to track to tape, I want fresh reels for every pass - especially if we're waxing an album. But of course that's not very practical today.

                            One of my favorite tips I learned from Craig Anderton is the "tape machine as signal processor" approach. I still have a 1/4" Otari that I keep in service for just this purpose - track to the DAW, and then do pass-throughs on a three-head analog deck; monitor off the playback head, and re-record to new DAW track(s). Nudge the offset / processed track(s) back into alignment in the DAW.

                            This approach lets you experiment with different tape formulations, over and under-biasing, tape compression / distortion and how hard you're going to slam the signal to tape and all of that after the recording is already made, which is much harder to do if you're recording to tape from the get-go. You're making a couple of extra passes through the converters, but the idea is to muck the signal up anyway, and the tape artifacts that you're trying to impart are going to mask any slight coloration you get from them.
                            **********

                            "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."
                            - George Carlin

                            "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."
                            - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                            "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."
                            - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              So where does the magic happen with tape recorders? Is it in the recording head? Playback head? On the tape itself?? The saturation that's always talked about...and perhaps other audio-favorable artifacts.

                              'Cause I'm wondering if advances in tape manufacturing could tip the scale on the usual problems with tape - noise, friction, clumsy editing potential, degradation over time, and the sheer amount of physical tape required to hold the audio.

                              I may just be displaying my ignorance, but tape is actually the cutting edge medium for big data storage these days. Maybe there's no translation or relation between storing bits and storing audio...out of my depth on that. (but cassettes used to hold data, right?) But IBM has got tape that holds insane amounts of data per square inch of tape - can such advances t somehow be put to use in the world of audio recording??

                              If the tape didn't have to move much - would the noise go away??

                              nat

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