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A great melody first, then lyrics,(only) THEN 'vocals'

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  • Thanks, Mark. Another beautiful song I'd never heard before.



    The arrangement -- the strings, piano, sax -- is just perfect.



    If I'm lucky, maybe someday I'll have someone like Melody Gardot sing one of my songs...



    LCK
    “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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    • There's something about 'summer songs' when listened-to in 'the bleak mid-winter.' They always seem much more evocative, don't they? Funny thing: they're usually recorded in mid-winter

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      • I have Lee Charles Kelley to thank for posting earlier this day, on my other favorite Lee's FRIDAY INFLUENCES thread, a video of Tony Bennett's lovely reading of a Johnny Mercer song about Paris: ONCE UPON A SUMMERTIME (one we celebrated pages ago, last night when we were young).



        I accepted the built-in invitation to

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        • Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn
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          I

          For months I've been telling friends that "track eleven on Tony's latest album - his duet with Stevie Wonder -- is the `pick of the litter.'" And while popular music's elder statesman -- now in his 81st year - would never have admitted it on stage last night, I believe that he and Stevie, in their heart-of-hearts would agree with the folks at the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences -- that this was the Grammy winner, among the 23 terrific duets on this album.




          Wow. Thanks for uploading this.



          I'd always thought that Stevie wrote this song, but found out recently that he hadn't. It was written by one of Motown's resident songwriters, Ron Miller (with Orlando Murden). If you haven't heard it, the story goes that Miller came up with the idea for the song the night his daughter was born.



          LCK
          “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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          • Your

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            • Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn
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              “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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              • In a few days (January 17) a newly-remastered version of my all-time favorite Sinatra album, THE CONCERT SINATRA will be released at Amazon

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                • Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn
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                  It was on a January day -- just like this one [20] years ago -- that I returned home from work to hear words from my wife that I'd been aching to hear: "You got a letter from Frank Sinatra."



                  I remember taking off my winter coat and boots, and stumbling into another room where I could be alone, making sure my hands were clean, and getting a bright reading light, and carefully opening the envelope and reading the note and re-reading it (ten times? twenty times?).



                  "I greatly appreciate your interest in my music" and "it was so nice of you to take the time to write."




                  Dang, Mark. You're one lucky Canadian!



                  Another amazing story for the archives...



                  LCK
                  “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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                  • Little reason to SMILE here in the world

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                    • Hard to beat Cole's version. But this is nice...






                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlwC2eTwNq4
                      __________
                      Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                      Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                      Jesus

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                      • I'd been tempted to upload a third version of SMILE

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                        • A final thought about SMILE, if I may (then I promise to leave it alone). It's funny when you think about it --- the ongoing power of a 58-year-old lyric to still impress itself on young hearts and minds, mated as it was, to

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                          • Quote Originally Posted by Mark Blackburn
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                            Charlie Chaplin (who liked to hear a good tenor) would have smiled, I think, to hear what young Mr. Groban does with his "best song.



                            Josh Groban Performs Smile on the Regis and Kelly Show 11/17/2011






                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-m4rHGvKLU




                            Nice.



                            LCK
                            “Good Vibrations” was probably a good record but who's to know? You had to play it about 90 bloody times to even hear what they were singing about. What’s next? Rock opera? —Pete Townshend, Melody Maker Interview, 1966.

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                            • You should write the lyrics first, then the melody.
                              Hamilton Steele CD's / Hamilton Steele MP3 Downloads / Hamilton Steele iTunes

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                              • I like to let the lyrics come to me AS I am creating the melody. They are almost simultaneous, though the main parts of the melody do tend to come first.
                                All things must pass...

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