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  • Mapex Armory Exterminator Snare Drum

    By Dendy Jarrett |

    mapexarmoryexterminator300x250-10c4bb75.jpg.9ceca9b754cedd44a3fa1ba614ad6a8a.jpgExpert Review:

    MAPEX Armory Snare Series – The Exterminator

    We pry open the weapons cache and review the arsenal of Mapex Armory high caliber snares

    by Dendy Jarrett

     

    ARMORY ARSENAL INTRO

     

    Mapex recently introduced a series of Armory snare drums. There are five drums total; each is distinctive in sound and look and appropriately named. The series has both metal and wood models.

    The wood models, like The Exterminator, feature the SONIClear™ bearing edges, while the metal models feature the same bearing edge found on the Black Panther™ series of snares, which is a slightly rounded 45 degrees. If you purchase one of the Mapex Armory kits, it comes standard with one of the five Armory Snares called The Tomahawk. (I’ll review this drum in a future installment.)

    And in a move that is purely ingenious, Mapex has a “trade in program” that I’ll cover at the end of this review. I went target shooting with The Daisy Cutter  in the first installment of the Armory Series Snares.

     

     

    The Exterminator is the second snare I‘ll lock ‘n’ load in the series. To appreciate the significance of the “Armory” grouping, let's review some history. 66thfigherb17-990f1a04.jpg.baf32f359b745b25dfede14455660386.jpgIn the Daisy Cutter review, we explored the “daisy cutter bomb” and the significance it held in war-time arsenals. For The Exterminator, there's a different but similar history.

     

    During World War II in the early 1940s the 57th Group’s 66th Fighter Wing Squadron was an escort for the B-17 Flying Fortress and the B-24 Liberator groups. They primarily flew P-47 Thunderbolts and P-51 Mustangs. Their job was to keep the enemy fighter planes from destroying the larger bombers.

     

    They were so effective that, over time, they became known as the Exterminators. The success of the carpet-bombing of the Bomber groups the Exterminators escorted is a huge part of the US success in World War II. These Exterminators were relentless in their attacks; hence, the appropriate name of the Mapex Armory Snare: The Exterminator.

     

     

     

    armoryexterminatorlogo-97f3a1dd.jpg.47ed7f460414c52c3122268913721e41.jpgThe Exterminator

    — Mass Impact

     

    The Exterminator features a 14” X 6.5”, 6.85mm 7-ply Birch/Walnut hybrid shell. The outer ply is highly figured in a quilted finish. It's an exquisite finish, and although the website states that it is an “ebony stain over figured wood,” I consider it to be more of an amber to dark-burst natural wood grain finish.

    This drum can be best summarized in its ability to provide mass impact.  I thought the hammered drum, The Daisy Cutter, was loud - but holy heck, this drum has “gut” appeal. You get the distinctive warm scream of the birch but the cutting punchy power and projection of the walnut (two wood types you wouldn’t typically find married).

    Historically, most drummers think of birch as a “studio” drum, but that confining thought process is waning. This drum would fit into any playing setting. The response range from pianissimo to forte is really amazing. You can get great buzz rolls to an extremely guttural punch with backbeat that will make the crowd (your band mates) sit up and take notice.

    The tube lugs add some classic simplicity to the drum's overall appeal, and this drum comes with a highly polished chrome finish on the hardware. The throw-off is smooth as glass to operate and is a Mapex Vertical proven design with the Piston Strainer. The snare wires are premium stainless steel with brass end-plates. Finally, the drum comes standard with the Remo® USA Coated Ambassador® Batter drumhead, which is yet another bonus you wouldn’t expect on a snare of this price range.

    It has the quality of much higher-priced snares —much more than the caliber you would expect for the price point.

     

     

    FALL OUT

     

    Much like the 66th Fighter Wing Squadron, this drum can clear the way for you. It can deliver mass impact volume but also the subtleties of a sneak attack. It's a striking drum that would look great on any kit and work well with any musical style. And here is the great part …

    Earlier in the review, I mentioned an ingenious “trade in program” Mapex recently launched: if you purchase an Armory drum set that comes standard with the steel Tomahawk snare, you’ll have two weeks after your kit purchase to test the snare. If you already have a steel snare or prefer a wood drum, or any one of the other five Armory Snares, you simply fill out an easy form and ship the snare back. The return form lets you swap it for another Armory Snare. I really believe this may be an industry first (I can’t say for sure, but I haven’t seen it in my 30 plus years in the industry).

    So, as you decide what you need in your war chest of drum gear, you should really give serious consideration to these Armory Snares. They’re high caliber!

    snaregroup-8ee33644.thumb.jpg.f4fb8e121393d8caf57dfc6e371c3bae.jpg 

    RESOURCES:

    Mapex Armory “Trade In” Program

    http://mapexdrums.com/us/armorytradein/

     

    WEB:

    Mapex Drums Official Website
    Mapex Armory “Trade In” Program

    VIDEOS:

    Harmony Central Looks At The Mapex Armory Snare Series:

     Mapex SoniClear Explained:

     Mapex Armory Series Drums:

      

    SHOP:

    TO PURCHASE THE EXTERMINATOR SNARE FROM MUSICIANS FRIEND
    TO SHOP THE ENTIRE ARMORY SNARE SERIES AT MUSICIANS FRIEND
    TO SHOP THE ENTIRE ARMORY DRUM SELECTION AT MUSICIANS FRIEND
    TO SHOP THE ENTIRE MAPEX SELECTION AT MUSICIANS FRIEND


    dendy-editorial-image-small-1c93e909.jpg.c4b54fe30afb3d73a08d32029bafd43b.jpgDendy Jarrett is the Publisher and Director of Harmony Central. He has been heavily involved at the executive level in many aspects of the drum and percussion industry for over 25 years and has been a professional player since he was 16. His articles and product reviews have been featured in InTune Monthly, Gig Magazine, DRUM! and Modern Drummer Magazines.

        




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