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uke records great acoustic doesnt

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  • uke records great acoustic doesnt

    w/ a 57 the uke is fine acoustic sounds bad . Its sounds like the mic is in a pipe .

  • #2
    Mic placement and preamplification is key to getting the best sound quality.
    Usually the pipe sound comes from having two mics recording the same sound source
    and the two mics are out of phase. An example would be an acoustic guitar and vocal mic .
    Because the sound gets to the guitar mic first, the vocal mic which also picks up sound is delayed.
    Instead of the two waves working together and being additive, the second mic is farther away and lags the first.
    This causes the signal to phase cancel.

    This is where the 3:1 rule comes into play. When you use two mics on the same source and one mic is
    up close, the second mic needs to be about 3' from the first to be in phase with the first mic.
    If its 1.5', half the distance the signals will be 180 degrees out of phase and cancel each other out.
    All you hear at that point is a very thin phasey tone with whatever sounds are unique to each mic getting through.

    If you're only using one mic, it may be sound reflections, mic angles, placement causing the problem.
    Best thing to do is monitors the sound with good isolation headphones, move the mic around until you find the
    sweetest spot when recording. Make sure you don't move the guitar around when recording too because it will
    create a Doppler effect. The rest you can tweak up mixing for best tones using EQ, Compression and Reverb.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post
      Mic placement and preamplification is key to getting the best sound quality.
      Usually the pipe sound comes from having two mics recording the same sound source
      and the two mics are out of phase. An example would be an acoustic guitar and vocal mic .
      Because the sound gets to the guitar mic first, the vocal mic which also picks up sound is delayed.
      Instead of the two waves working together and being additive, the second mic is farther away and lags the first.
      This causes the signal to phase cancel.

      This is where the 3:1 rule comes into play. When you use two mics on the same source and one mic is
      up close, the second mic needs to be about 3' from the first to be in phase with the first mic.
      If its 1.5', half the distance the signals will be 180 degrees out of phase and cancel each other out.
      All you hear at that point is a very thin phasey tone with whatever sounds are unique to each mic getting through.

      If you're only using one mic, it may be sound reflections, mic angles, placement causing the problem.
      Best thing to do is monitors the sound with good isolation headphones, move the mic around until you find the
      sweetest spot when recording. Make sure you don't move the guitar around when recording too because it will
      create a Doppler effect. The rest you can tweak up mixing for best tones using EQ, Compression and Reverb.
      thank you,will try agin keeping in mind what you said

      Comment



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