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Fattening my guitar

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  • Fattening my guitar

    I was just wondering how to get a fatter guitar sound on my recordings? I was wondering how many guitar tracks it is common to have ie should i have more than one in each chanel?

  • #2
    maybe try a chorus or duplicate the track and pan them in different directions
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    • #3
      Is your guitar acoustic or electrice, amp'd or DI'd, clean or saturated, dry or reverb'd? Tried heavier strings or smaller speakers?

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      • #4
        I just took a guitar solo I was working on and added three tracks of small delay (offsetting each one by just a bit), panned a bit and was very suprised how this simple little technique fattened up the sound on the mix. Unfortunately I had put some reverb on the sound going in to the recorder, so the solo sounded just a bit distant, but live and learn. I'll try it again soon!
        Jeff
        More about me and my music: JeffOestreichMusic.com

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        • #5
          Ive got an electric its goin through a mesa dual recto into a laney quad with 12 inch speakers if that helps at all.

          Thanks for the suggestions I'll give em a try

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          • #6
            Here's a trick that might be the cure:
            Usually it would be to mic two totally different ditinct amplifiers (different brands also like fender and Marshalls) and Pan each of them hard left and hard right and you will be surprised by how big the guitar sound will become.
            To do the equivilant with one AMP, record one track and then double it (by copying it to another track). Now EQ one of the tracks in a dramatic fashion to get a totally different and distinct sound (as if it's a totaly different amp with diferent tonal colors). What usually works best Is to leave one track with good overall definition in the whole EQ spectrum but on the other track to emphasize only few frequncies by totally boosting some of the mid frequencies. When your done EQing the heavily eq'd track might sound really bad on it's own but the way it compliment the other track will be really amazing when both are played together. I would radically cut the bass on one track while totally boast anything(NOTeverything) between 500-4khz. I would first try the 900mghz and then experiment with the other frequencies.(Remember to Pan Hard Lef and hard right for best results...)

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            • #7
              try using different mics... ie, an sm57 right on the speaker and a condenser a few feet back... if it happens to be an open back cabinet, try to mic the back and front... also mix the signal from the amps direct out if it has one, into a direct box, then mix that with the mic or mics... a little compression can help too
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              • #8
                Double tracking is usually the best option. Simply copying a track does nothing whatsoever to fatten a guitar; it just makes it louder. EQ, delay, chorus, and similar effects work ok but generally sound a bit artificial. Pros use double (or triple, or quadruple, etc) guitars almost without exception.

                Of course, if you're a sloppy player, it can be a real pain to double track, in which case it may be better just to use an effect. I've gotten a decent result by running one track through an amp simulator or a distortion plugin and panning the effected track differently, but there's nothing quite like a real double tracked instrument. You get a combination of small variations in tone, pitch, timing, phase, and ambient noise that really opens a stereo image wide.
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                • #9
                  What about things like improvised solos and rythm parts. Or are these pretty choreographed in real professional recordings so they can be doubled?
                  Jeff
                  More about me and my music: JeffOestreichMusic.com

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jeffoest
                    What about things like improvised solos and rythm parts. Or are these pretty choreographed in real professional recordings so they can be doubled?


                    Depends on the professional who is recording. Most people double rhythm parts. Solos don't generally have to have that "huge" sound like rhythm parts do.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by spinman

                      . Solos don't generally have to have that "huge" sound like rhythm parts do.


                      I agree, actually most of the time you want the exact opposite, so it will be articulate enough to hear what's goin' on. I generally find it's actually easier to play as well. Most people try walls of eqing and distortion, but I find a flatter eq and not as much gain and proper micing to win the best results. It's easier to play that way too, when you can hear what you're doing hehe.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hewy80
                        Ive got an electric its goin through a mesa dual recto into a laney quad with 12 inch speakers if that helps at all.

                        Thanks for the suggestions I'll give em a try


                        Be sure not to overpower the room. Reflections can kill guitar tones.
                        -Chris Graff

                        Russ Long's Guide to Nashville Recording

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chrisgraff


                          Be sure not to overpower the room. Reflections can kill guitar tones.


                          Yeah I've got the gain down compared to what I normally play with and also the volume is loud enough for the amp to sound good but not deafening. I intend to use a few guitar tracks with the mic in different positions hopefully that will give it some fatness.

                          Thanks guys/girls you've been a great help!

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                          • #14
                            Like most here suggested, just double the part. I usually have a SM-57 on the bottom left (off of the center about 1/2 inch) speaker in my 4x12 and then double with a SM-58 on the upper right speaker (tilted down and ~2-3 inches off center) It provides enough difference when editing I can tell which I like best and boost it a bit, the other is panned just a bit. The different mics dont make that much of a difference, I just do it so I just have to change the input to the computer while keeping both setup.

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                            • #15
                              depending on how much gear you have (and how many simultaneous tracks you can record) try using a bunch of mics on an amp. last weekend i recorded a hardcore band with 2 guitar players and had 4 mics on a marchall half stack, and 4 on a fender twin. the lead guitar was through the twin. the whole thing was done live and the guitars are already big as hell, no need to double.
                              "When I say be skeptical of everything I mean it. Just because someone was elected to do a job doesn't mean that person has any idea of what they're doing."- Sen. Bob Kerry

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