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  • Guitar Solo EQ Question

    Hey,
    Over the years, I've noticed that in a lot of my recorded guitar solos, fast runs on the lower strings just don't stand out enough. All the higher notes are crystal clear, no matter how fast I'm playing 'em, but down on the E and A strings (even on the 12th fret and above) things get a bit muddy. What would you all recommend, EQ-wise, to remedy this situation?
    Thanks in advance.
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  • #2
    for a solo You simply have to boast the mids and roll off some of the lows. The main thing really is to boast the mids. A very
    good useful EQ curve for guitar solo would be a boast with a shape that resemble an ARC between 200mghz and 7khz(the least boasted frequncies would be the 200Mhz and 7khz. Very simple and used all over.

    To use single frequncies:Another option would be to boast somewhere between the 500mhz and 900, I like the 900. with another boast between 3500 or 4000.

    Comment


    • #3
      Huh? All those setting suggestions without hearing a sample clip???

      Micwalt - you question is the equivalent of asking how long is a piece of string...... the only possible answer is "it depends!"
      bruce valeriani - mix engineer
      recording articles
      blue bear sound recording studios

      There are 2 components to Audio Engineering -
      The first is understanding signal flow... the second is all about what you hear...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by GitarMan
        for a solo You simply have to boast the mids and roll off some of the lows. The main thing really is to boast the mids. A very
        good useful EQ curve for guitar solo would be a boast with a shape that resemble an ARC between 200mghz and 7khz(the least boasted frequncies would be the 200Mhz and 7khz. Very simple and used all over.

        To use single frequncies:Another option would be to boast somewhere between the 500mhz and 900, I like the 900. with another boast between 3500 or 4000.



        Damn your hearing is way better than mine, and you must have some bad-ass monitors too
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        • #5
          Hmm. I'm with gitarman on this. First off, we're assuming this is a sort of straight-ahead monsters-of-rock les paul into marshall stack guitar solo, or something more or less like that, sm57 right on the amp. With that in mind, you can certaintly make predictions about eq, and you really don't need a clip to do it. At the end of the day, you could eq that solo without any monitors and probably be right. And look at the recommendations: boost gently between 200hz and 7k . . . well, that's pretty much all of it, centered around 3.5k or so, it'll pop, won't it? Or, boost at 900hz (where alot of the character of that guitar sound is) and again at 3.5 k. Yea, that'll work. Maybe it's ugly to reduce it to a foruma, but it's not a bad one he's got there.
          Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bobby yarrow
            Maybe it's ugly to reduce it to a foruma, but it's not a bad one he's got there.
            It's not "ugly", it's simply inaccurate!

            There's no way to make a blanket statement about EQ'ing without hearing the context of the track in the rest of the mix.
            bruce valeriani - mix engineer
            recording articles
            blue bear sound recording studios

            There are 2 components to Audio Engineering -
            The first is understanding signal flow... the second is all about what you hear...

            Comment


            • #7
              I just tried it and....... it works !!

              Comment


              • #8
                I like to stick my head in a microwave oven and roast it - somewhere between 500mhz and 900 ... try it - it works!

                The first thing about guitar is the speakers and strings. Many 4 x 12 cabs are flatulent around the bottom E and A strings. I just got a Mesa 12" Electrovoice 200W Theile tuned cab - that has tightened up the bottom end significantly. Heavier strings can also add more weight if you need it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kingnome
                  I just tried it and....... it works !!
                  I heard what you tried.... trust me, it isn't working!!!
                  bruce valeriani - mix engineer
                  recording articles
                  blue bear sound recording studios

                  There are 2 components to Audio Engineering -
                  The first is understanding signal flow... the second is all about what you hear...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How does it sound when you play it live? You're best off fixing the sound at source rather than trying to compensate later on.

                    Definitely you want new strings so you have a full range of harmonics being produced.

                    What amp are you using? If you're using a big stack you may want to consider a smaller combo with a single speaker and raised off the floor. The sound is generally going to be a lot tighter. A lot of the best recorded tones don't come from the huge stacks that you see on stage. Personally I like a 15 or 30W amp at most with single 10 or 12 inch speaker (although twin would also do nicely if it's the Fender variety). The other thing is that you don't say what else is going on in the mix. If you've got stacks of layered guitar all chugging away with open power chords for example it's unrealistic to expect the bass and mids of a solo to be able to cut through the same range that everything else is playing in. Whether that's the case or not you want to think about what is occupying the frequency space and consider cutting parts which may be masking what you want to hear.

                    You may also need to use less reverb which can muddy things up - especially if you're tracking with reverb on the amp and then adding more reverb. Try tracking it drier then using less reverb in the mix - and experimernt with some predelay to separate the reverb sound from the initial attack.

                    I agree with not generalizing, but Gitarman makes an interesting point with regard to mids. Many guitarists have a tendency to hugely scoop out the mids on their amp and consequently lose some of the body and definition. Rather than boosting the mids later though, I would suggest being more conservative with the amp's tone settings than you would normally - this also doesn't cut things you might want to keep later on. Also when setting up your amp for recording, play the lead in the context of the mix while tweaking the knobs - the advantage of recording rather than playing live is that you can be more specific with the settings for a particular part.

                    Also what guitar and pickup combinations are you using? I love the warm sound of humbuckers for example, but a single coil will often cut through a full mix more effectively and will sound less muddy in itself as you haven't got the blurring effect which you get from having two different pickup points.

                    Cheers,
                    Daniel

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Blue Bear Sound
                      I heard what you tried.... trust me, it isn't working!!!


                      Well, I didn't really try it..... At least......not intentionally !

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sounds to me like you need to set up your guitar better... or that there are elements of the arrangement that are occurring from other instruments that are interfering with the audio/guitar solo.

                        However... you may want to look into the Analog Device 200 MHz Laser Diode Driver with Light Power Control unit... who knows, it could come in handy..
                        .
                        CN Fletcher

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                        R/E/P -- professional Recording Engineer and Producer forums... serious hobbyists welcome

                        mwagener wrote on Sat, 11 September 2004 14:33
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by greendoor
                          I like to stick my head in a microwave oven and roast it - somewhere between 500mhz and 900 ... try it - it works!

                          It sounds like you've done it a couple of times already. I'll take your word for it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Blue Bear Sound
                            It's not "ugly", it's simply inaccurate!

                            There's no way to make a blanket statement about EQ'ing without hearing the context of the track in the rest of the mix.

                            Well I did make a blanket statement, and now you have to live with it. So you're incapable of giving a recomendation unless you hear something, so much for a professional attitude ehh

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Blue Bear Sound
                              Huh? All those setting suggestions without hearing a sample clip???

                              Micwalt - you question is the equivalent of asking how long is a piece of string...... the only possible answer is "it depends!"


                              Why so much arrogance and redicule.
                              So you, all knowledgable and mighty decide the questions and the answers, why don't you adjust the question the way you think it should be asked so you're capable of answering it insead of saying "It depends"?
                              You claim it's the only possible answer. No, it's not, it's the only answer YOU can come up with, you simply have no clue how to behave in public. If you don't like a question, it's not very nice to come out and redicule it. You must not leave your studio often, do you?

                              Oh, I guess you couldn't live with yourslef without providing your eternal wisdom saying "It depends", thank you for a major contribution I'm sure micwalt will correct the quesion to fit your rigid Pro standards

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