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  • Mic types

    Can anyone explain mic types. Condenser (large, small...) Which one is suitable for vocal or instrument.


    Thanks....
    Hayalem

  • #2
    i think just about every type of mic can be used for vocals.

    ribbons are fragile and expensive, so we'll exclude those for now.

    dynamics are usually used for up close micing of things that are really loud (like guitar cabs and the like) but can be used for vocals...like the sennheiser 441 or SM57 even.

    large diaphragm condensers are probably what you're talking about though. i believe that the small diaphragm ones are too directional for vocals.

    btw, i was kind of just BS'ing there...so take it with a grain of salt.

    Comment


    • #3
      and to expand on that slightly...

      the small diaphragm condensers are usually used as overheads.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hayalem
        Can anyone explain mic types. Condenser (large, small...) Which one is suitable for vocal or instrument.


        Thanks....
        http://www.homerecording.com/bbs/showthread.php?threadid=27030

        Comment


        • #5
          Small Diaphragm Condensers have a better transient response (how quickly they can react to the attack of an instrument, like a drum hit) because of their small diaphragm size. They also tend to sound a great deal better on frequencies above 100-150 Hz or so because the diaphragm is too small to accurately transduce lower frequencies. They often come in a wide variety of polar patterns. Many mics, such as the AKG C451 and 480, are "system" mics. Meaning that the capsule of the mic can be unscrewed and another capsule, with a different polar pattern, put on. Therefore you have one mic with many possible patterns.

          Large Diaphragm Condensers tend to handle lower frequencies better but don't react to transients quite as fast. They also tend to be a little flatter in their frequency response but still have plenty of high end sparkle to make a vocal sound good. These are standard for vocals.
          Punk in Drublic

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 120 dB
            Small Diaphragm Condensers tend to sound a great deal better on frequencies above 100-150 Hz or so because the diaphragm is too small to accurately transduce lower frequencies.

            Large Diaphragm Condensers tend to handle lower frequencies better but don't react to transients quite as fast. They also tend to be a little flatter in their frequency response but still have plenty of high end sparkle to make a vocal sound good. These are standard for vocals.


            This is all so wrong for so many reasons.
            Harvey Gerst
            Indian Trail Recording Studio
            http://www.ITRstudio.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Harvey Gerst


              This is all so wrong for so many reasons.


              I don't doubt it, but please explain.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well the thread that was suggested is a good starting place:

                http://www.homerecording.com/bbs/showthread.php?threadid=27030

                Quick answer:

                Small diaphragm condenser mics (as a general class) can be made flatter in response, with better off-axis response, and can go lower than most large diaphragm condenser mics (especially the small, pure pressure omni mics, which can extend flat down to a few cycles). You sacrifice noise for these benefits.

                Large diaphragm mics generally have more coloration, poorer off-axis response, and more coloration (sometimes a very flattering coloration, particularly for vocals). They are lower in noise than the same mic with a smaller diaphragm.

                The thead that Joe and I suggested goes in to far greater detail as to the differences and advantages (and disadvantages) of each type of microphone design.

                It's a long thread, but you'll come out of it with a greater understanding of how mics work, which mics to use for different situations, and how to place mics to achieve specific results.
                Harvey Gerst
                Indian Trail Recording Studio
                http://www.ITRstudio.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you take the time to read the http://www.homerecording.com/bbs/showthread.php?threadid=27030 thread a few times (I even printed out a hard copy of it), I think you'll be more than happy that you took the time to read it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Harvey Gerst


                    This is all so wrong for so many reasons.


                    Please do indulge me.
                    Punk in Drublic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Unlike speakers, a larger condenser diaphragm doesn't mean lower; it means louder. Flatter is a result of taming unwanted resonances - a harder job when the diaphragm is larger.

                      Extended low frequency response can be easily achieved with pure pressure mics, i.e., omnidirectional mics that use a single diaphragm. Multi pattern mics in omni mode don't work the same way as a pure pressure mic; they mimic an omni pattern by combining two pressure gradient patterns.

                      As the diaphragm size increases, it is harder to maintain even tensioning, and the diameter of the diaphragm is now larger than the highest desired wavelength to be captured, resulting in uneven off-axis response, and peaks and nulls in the response in the audible range.

                      120dB, did you mean "indulge" or "enlighten"? If you meant "enlighten", the above paragraphs should help. If you really did mean "indulge", sorry, but I can't do that when you present erroneous information as fact.
                      Harvey Gerst
                      Indian Trail Recording Studio
                      http://www.ITRstudio.com

                      Comment



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