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How do you get huge guitar sounds?

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  • #16
    What preamps are you using? What does it sound like now? What do you think is missing?

    Here are some things to concider;

    1.) Do Not Go by how the amp sounds in the room! Twist the knobs till it sounds good through the monitors.
    2.) Do Not try and emulate a particular guitar sound you heard on an album. You are hearing the guitars AND Bass. Most likely if you took the bass tracks away,...you wouldnt like the guitar sound as much anymore.
    3.) Get the cab off the floor.
    4.) Turn up the mids! Guitars have the responsibility of the Mid section of a song. Having the Bass & Treble on 10 and the Mids on 0 might sound good to you in the room(I still cant figure why but anyway),...But will sound ****************ty and thin in a mix.
    5.) Try using Just the SM57 till you can make it sound good! Untill then, you are probably adding more problems with more mics.
    6.) MIC PLACEMENT!
    7.) MIC PLACEMENT!
    8.) MIC PLACEMENT!
    9.) Moving the mic a fraction of an inch, could dramatically change the sound. Dont forget we live in a 3-Dimensional world. Use it when trying mic placement. Move it Up, Down, Left, Right, Angle it, etc,...
    10.) Turn Down the gain. Makes for a more Clear, and Meaty tone.
    11.) Double Track. This cannot be duplicated any other way, than actually playing the part more than once. Can make a guitar sound huge and ballzy.
    12.) Try panning 2 tracks hard/pretty hard left and right. This makes for a bigger immage in the monitors. Sounds Bigger, and can also define the guitars more. Puts them in their own place in the 3D mixing field. Doesn fight with other sources that are panned to the center as much(like vox and bass).

    On a side note regarding the XXX;
    I had that amp for while. It can be prety baddass in the right hands. Pretty damn versatile. Try this;
    Grab some JJ 12AT7, 12AU7, and 12DW7 Preamp tubes from eurotubes.com. They are lower gain tubes that will take the edgyness off of that amp. Try some JJ 6L6's instead of EL34's for a bigger sound. And have the amp PROPERLY Biased! It Will make a world of difference.
    I hope this helps.
    AmpsPETERS AMPSClipzFOR SALE: -CHARVEL DEAD CALM AQUA-EVH Wolfgang Special MIJ

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    • #17
      Originally posted by A_P_Seal


      I've been wondering about the POD. Have you been happy with it or was it one of those one of those pieces that sounded too good to be true and then in fact was? I'm no guitarist, but I was thinking of picking one up to have on hand for the dudes that come in to record with a real pig amp. I also like being shockingly familiar with everything in the room and I thought using the POD for my walk-ins would make my life simpler... any thoughts?


      I've had the POD for almost exactly 3 years. I was quite impressed with it when I first got it, but that's not saying much. I've never been a big guitar tone afficianado. The stuff I record is not "all about guitar tone". Guitar is just one instrument in the mix. After 3 years, familiarity has bred some contempt for its sound, and I'm working on a decent little amp setup for recording guitars. A lot of guys slag on the POD because it's digital, because it isn't a perfect representation of what is says, because it doesn't meet up to their requirements for tones, whatever. I've simply found that for DI guitar that isn't driving the song it works great. Have't heard the XT version yet. I mean, if BB King or Eric Clapton or Phish came to record at my studio I wouldn't even think of asking them to use the POD, but for throwing down some parts on a pop track it's quite convenient and does a more than adequate job. If you're going to have a lot of indy groups around it may be good to have in the studio for some kid who wants to get a metal sound from his dad's peavey classic 30.
      Homebrew CD reviews at LoveLaborMusic.com
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      • #18
        Originally posted by spinman


        I've had the POD for almost exactly 3 years. I was quite impressed with it when I first got it, but that's not saying much. I've never been a big guitar tone afficianado. The stuff I record is not "all about guitar tone". Guitar is just one instrument in the mix. After 3 years, familiarity has bred some contempt for its sound, and I'm working on a decent little amp setup for recording guitars. A lot of guys slag on the POD because it's digital, because it isn't a perfect representation of what is says, because it doesn't meet up to their requirements for tones, whatever. I've simply found that for DI guitar that isn't driving the song it works great. Have't heard the XT version yet. I mean, if BB King or Eric Clapton or Phish came to record at my studio I wouldn't even think of asking them to use the POD, but for throwing down some parts on a pop track it's quite convenient and does a more than adequate job. If you're going to have a lot of indy groups around it may be good to have in the studio for some kid who wants to get a metal sound from his dad's peavey classic 30.


        Thumbs down on the POD XT, by the way. You can't get anything to fit in a mix. Somehow, it always sounds far away, no matter how much you tweak.

        I think I actually like the old POD pro better. For some reason, the digital outs on that thing sound killer. Not so much with the XT.

        I ended up exchanging mine for the Vox Tonelab. Not perfect by any means, but things do sit better.
        -Chris Graff

        Russ Long's Guide to Nashville Recording

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