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Speaker/Listening Position in Odd-Shaped Room?

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  • Speaker/Listening Position in Odd-Shaped Room?

    Hi all,

    Just wanted to post a measurement diagram of my room and see if anyone can help me with where I should place my monitors and desk for best listening position? I know a fair bit about room acoustics and have a well treated room at home, but while I'm at college my room is shaped like this, somewhat oddly. If it helps, my ceiling is just under 8 feet. Also, the desk as pictured is to-scale.

    I am currently using Yamaha HS5's but may very well switch soon to Focal CMS65's or CMS50's with sub (good or bad idea / which of these two?)

    So, what would be the best mixing position here?

    Thanks,
    -Josh

  • #2
    bump!

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    • #3
      I'd likely use the 11" or 16" wall. My garage studio has a similar shape because I built a wall and ceiling under the one garage door which can be lifted from the outside over the drop ceiling.

      The shape in your case helps diffract the sound and prevent as many problem with bass collecting in corners. You'll find the upper right hand corner of that diagram collect the most bass if it winds up being like mince when I treated it.

      You should realize, with near field monitors Its not like you're trying to fill the entire room with sound using a Hi Fi or surround system so it sounds good in every place in the room. You're essentially concerned with how the speakers in a direct line within 3~4" of the speakers. Monitors are set for mixing at 83dB which is about as loud as you'd set a TV for listening.

      Most of your mixing will be done at that volume level. Of course as your mix is completed you will likely want to crank it up and see how it sounds. That's where the room treatment comes in. In a larger studio you may have a set of distant monitors and close monitors for listening. That's where you'd have to worry about the room being tuned. If you only have near fields, then room treatment would mainly be for recording purposes and cutting down reflection levels.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post
        I'd likely use the 11" or 16" wall. My garage studio has a similar shape because I built a wall and ceiling under the one garage door which can be lifted from the outside over the drop ceiling.

        The shape in your case helps diffract the sound and prevent as many problem with bass collecting in corners. You'll find the upper right hand corner of that diagram collect the most bass if it winds up being like mince when I treated it.

        You should realize, with near field monitors Its not like you're trying to fill the entire room with sound using a Hi Fi or surround system so it sounds good in every place in the room. You're essentially concerned with how the speakers in a direct line within 3~4" of the speakers. Monitors are set for mixing at 83dB which is about as loud as you'd set a TV for listening.

        Most of your mixing will be done at that volume level. Of course as your mix is completed you will likely want to crank it up and see how it sounds. That's where the room treatment comes in. In a larger studio you may have a set of distant monitors and close monitors for listening. That's where you'd have to worry about the room being tuned. If you only have near fields, then room treatment would mainly be for recording purposes and cutting down reflection levels.
        Interesting... someone suggested I put the desk facing the 9' wall- any merit to that? Or reasons why the two walls you listed may be better?

        I do plan on messing around with Room EQ Wizard to get a better idea of the frequency response in multiple positions, but I'm not sure if I can use it with my CAD M179 or SM58, or actually have to buy a calibration mic?

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        • #5
          In the meantime, I've come up with a number of options here for desk placement:

          Me facing 1) the longest wall from a few feet away, 2) the 11' wall from a few feet away, or the "cubby" of the room, 3) centered between the big walls and a couple feet back from that outwards corner, or perhaps 4) centered along the 9' wall, 2 or 3 feet back. I've attached a diagram of these possibilities.

          I guess what it comes down to is whether I should be more wary of side reflections, rear reflections, or front reflections and the symmetry of each, respectively.

          Also, I've got a full size bed that can go either along the 9' wall, or by the far 7' wall. Thoughts?

          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by joshhpmusic View Post

            Interesting... someone suggested I put the desk facing the 9' wall- any merit to that? Or reasons why the two walls you listed may be better?

            I do plan on messing around with Room EQ Wizard to get a better idea of the frequency response in multiple positions, but I'm not sure if I can use it with my CAD M179 or SM58, or actually have to buy a calibration mic?
            If you used the small end, the standing waves will be too great. Any small U shaped area will have this issue to some degree. Not only will the bass get compressed because the walls are close together but having monitors close to the corners exaggerates the bass too much.

            I suggest you stay on a wall that is wide so the corners aren't an issue and center it between the two side walls so any reflections from the side will reflect back evenly. I base that on having a similar shaped room for the past 20 years and having tried all positions.

            Wall treatment is also important. You don't want the sound bouncing back at you. If you set up on the 11" wall be sure to pad that short 4' panel or it will do odd things on the right side with your back facing it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by WRGKMC View Post

              If you used the small end, the standing waves will be too great. Any small U shaped area will have this issue to some degree. Not only will the bass get compressed because the walls are close together but having monitors close to the corners exaggerates the bass too much.

              I suggest you stay on a wall that is wide so the corners aren't an issue and center it between the two side walls so any reflections from the side will reflect back evenly. I base that on having a similar shaped room for the past 20 years and having tried all positions.

              Wall treatment is also important. You don't want the sound bouncing back at you. If you set up on the 11" wall be sure to pad that short 4' panel or it will do odd things on the right side with your back facing it.
              Ok, I appreciate this. I'm probably between either the 11' wall or the 9' wall at this point. The corner between those walls has a closet door that I can open from the 9' wall towards the 11', which means that if I angle it correctly I could possibly eliminate some corner bass buildup. I also have a dresser that I can put diagonally in either adjacent corner (depending on where my desk ends up), to do some similar bass elimination/redirecting. Thoughts?

              Comment


              • #8
                Most of the time, when someone creates a home studio, they are stuck having to take the room size they are given.

                Three tips -
                1. Have your monitors roughly six feet away from you so you can listen on loud playback for your final masters. And not against a wall.
                2. A sub woofer is a MUST if you want to properly represent anything 100hz or less.
                3. After that, you must listen to commercial songs and learn their sonic qualities on YOUR setup, in YOUR room. Once you learn how industry standard sounds, then you can replicate it.

                I wish you the very best of luck with your music.

                Comment


                • WRGKMC
                  WRGKMC commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Did you even look at his room dimensions? How is he supposed to sit 6' away from monitors in a room that's only 7X11' in its largest area and still keep the gear away from the walls and corners? The only important thing is to have triangulation where all sides of the triangle are equal if that means he's 3' away from monitors that are 3' apart so be it.

                  Loudness is a matter of setting things for 83dB and if he does calibrate to that level, its low enough where the room shape or size isn't a huge factor, especially if some sound absorption to kill reflectivity is added.

                  I also disagree with you suggesting you have to use a sub. Anything you do to change the monitors will have an equal and opposite effect on the mix. By adding bottom end to the monitors you in fact wind up with a thin sounding mix when your compensate mixing. You dial out what's been added mixing to get a flat response.

                  You can do whatever you want for testing a mix but its important to keep the monitors as flat as possible for mixing purposes. If you like strong bass response in your finished recordings you may even want to have the monitors a tad shy of bass. If you use subs then dialing up a minimum amount is recommended especially if they are an add on to the monitors and not part of a matched set.
                  Last edited by WRGKMC; 04-24-2018, 07:29 AM.
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