Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

OK I'm going to play the dummy here. What else do I need?

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OK I'm going to play the dummy here. What else do I need?

    Until now I have always used stand alone units for recording. After year of not really doing any recording the itch is back. I have an iMac loaded with Logic Pro X. I'll be using a Roland FA-06 as a controller as well as for the sounds. And I have speakers. Where do I go from here? Thanks for your help.

  • #2
    It depends what types of music you'll be producing.

    If you'll need to record acoustic instruments or vocals of any description, you'll need a separate audio interface (because the FA-06 doesn't have adequate I/O) and at least one or two decent mics. Search this forum for suggestions in your price range.

    Other than that, it's all about the room(s).

    Some basic acoustic treatment is essential. This can range from strategically placed bookcases and wall-hangings, to purpose built bass-traps, absorbers and diffusors. All other things being equal, the overall quality of the mixes you end up producing will depend hugely on how your rooms sound/respond.

    I realise I'm opening a huge can of worms here, but the value of acoustic treatment cannot be overstated, no matter what type of music you make.
    flip the phase

    Comment


    • #3
      So if I'm basically recording from the FA-06 to start with I'm good to go since it's direct recording? Then when I add vocals I can design a make shift acoustically balance sound booth, right? I'm guessing I'll need the interface at that time as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ya, you're good to go, for tracking from the FA-06.

        Interface and mic needed for vocals, for sure.

        But the point about acoustic treatment had less to do with vocal isolation (though that too is important), and more to do with the frequency response of the room in which you mix. Most rooms will have problems with standing waves below ~350-500hZ, and problems of reflectivity which will affect all frequencies above that, which will cause all sorts of problems - because you'll end up correcting a mix to suit the room problems, instead of correcting the mix in and of itself.

        It's a good idea to google 'mix room acoustic treatment', 'diy bass traps', and 'treating standing waves' - things like that. And glean whatever info you can from what you find. Diffusors and absorbers are a must in most rooms, as is some type of treatment for the bottom end.

        A little acoustic treatment can go an awful long way towards improving the quality of your mixes.
        flip the phase

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks so much. I really appreciate the info.

          Comment


          • #6
            Open catalog; get one of everything.

            Seriously, you get tools/stuff to solve problems. Get to work and when you need something, get it.
            Tim O'Brien

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gubu View Post
              Other than that, it's all about the room(s).

              Some basic acoustic treatment is essential. This can range from strategically placed bookcases and wall-hangings, to purpose built bass-traps, absorbers and diffusors. All other things being equal, the overall quality of the mixes you end up producing will depend hugely on how your rooms sound/respond.

              I realise I'm opening a huge can of worms here, but the value of acoustic treatment cannot be overstated, no matter what type of music you make.
              I'll have to disagree somewhat here.

              For tracking, while it's nice to have some room treatment, but if you're overdubbing close-miked instruments, or cutting vox, it's not really all that critical. Build a little tent w/a packing blanket for cutting vocals.

              It helps to have some treatment in your room, as far as mixing, but if you know what's going on, you can work around most issues.

              It all comes down to the song, the players and getting the right mic in the right position.

              For example, drums for this were tracked in a one-car garage, w/a few packing blankets tacked up. No accurate monitoring to speak of during tracking - I was just going by what I knew would work.

              Guitars and bass were tracked in untreated home studios.

              It was mixed in a decent room, but very fast - 2 days for the whole record. But these guys can really play. <g>

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtDl...=RDEtDl-xf7UHU

              MG
              Last edited by MarkGifford-1; 08-12-2014, 07:29 AM.
              "Thank You, NASA!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MarkGifford-1 View Post

                I'll have to disagree somewhat here.

                For tracking, while it's nice to have some room treatment, but if you're overdubbing close-miked instruments, or cutting vox, it's not really all that critical. Build a little tent w/a packing blanket for cutting vocals.

                It helps to have some treatment in your room, as far as mixing, but if you know what's going on, you can work around most issues.

                It all comes down to the song, the players and getting the right mic in the right position.

                For example, drums for this were tracked in a one-car garage, w/a few packing blankets tacked up. No accurate monitoring to speak of during tracking - I was just going by what I knew would work.

                Guitars and bass were tracked in untreated home studios.

                It was mixed in a decent room, but very fast - 2 days for the whole record. But these guys can really play. <g>

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtDl...=RDEtDl-xf7UHU

                MG
                The point about room treatment was specifically about mixing, since the OP will be mostly be using in-the-box sounds from his FA-06.

                I've had great results recording in untreated rooms. When it comes to mixing, not so much. And, in actual fact, a little attention to treatment, such as soft wall hangings at reflection points, something diffusive like a large bookcase behind the mix position, and having heavy furniture in the corners, can go an awful long way towards getting much, much better mixes.

                I wasn't suggesting that the OP completely remodel his spare room
                flip the phase

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a super dead room for recording and mixing. They used to use them allot back in the late 70/s 80's My concern building it was sound proofing first to avoid problems with the neighbors by using multi layers of material and the result was the room was like being in a coffin with no reflections.

                  Sound coming from speaker cabs is hard to get used to at first. Its allot like performing outdoors for directivity. The sound doesn't get reflected like it would in a normal room. When I place a mic on the other side of the room you just get a smaller delayed sound. No reflections worth noting.

                  Mixing is the same. You can walk around and hear the music from a distance but you don't hear it reflecting from walls or behind you like you do in a normal room. This can make it a bit fatiguing getting a good mix because without reflectivity you cant tell how the mix excites the air within that room. Everything is direct, almost like wearing headphones, except you do have three dimensional depth from the source.

                  Tracking amps doesn't sound much different form recording direct because there's so little reflectivity, you have no idea how large the room is.
                  I actually had to add reflective panels for the drums because the sound was too dead. I rely on using artificial reverbs and echoes etc. for all ambiance because none exists otherwise.

                  Luckily I do my mastering in a normal living room type environment. I can spot when a mix ifs out of perspective fairly easily. If I add too little reflection or its too dry its easy to hear and go back and fix. I do wish I had a nice reverb room for tracking some stuff though. My wife and I bought a second house to rent and eventually retire in. Its got several large downstairs rooms which I can leave reflective and get some decent recordings. By then I'll be so sick of the dry extreme I'll likely make use of that reflection.

                  For mixing you really only need two walls treated and a carpeted floor. Then some bass traps for the corners. Keep the mixing desk mixing position about 1/4 to 1/3 rooms length out in the room away from the wall staying away from corners which boost the bass response. How much reflectivity you need from there is a matter of results. Dark sounding mixes usually come from an overly bright sounding room and vice versa. At lower volumes where you normally use studio monitors the room has to be pretty bad to make huge mistakes. An open basement with nothing but bare cement walls may be cool for recording drums but overkill for everything else including mixing.

                  Comment













                  Working...
                  X