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  • Hi,
    I think if your playback levels are really low on your disk that you are not mastering with enough limiting or compression. If you do not have a program in which to do Mastering with you can try running your final mix out to an outboard compressor. Afterwards make sure you NORMALIZE the audio to bring it up to 0db or something close to it. Hope this helps.

    Hah, if you want to make things louder right off the bat you can try slamming the hell out of everything you record with a compressor to get rid of the peaks. I mean.... experiment with it. Especially if you're mixing heavy music of a sort, you can get away with murder in compression now a days.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by jjjetton22
      Thanks for the post. it helped. However Im having troubles recording with my playback levels after the CD has been burned and sometimes just on the playback. I need some advice on what to do during recording to make sure the levels aren't so low. I have a Yamaha AW16G. I understand this isnt the top of the line, but there must be something a novice like myself can do.Any advice would be helpful.


      Hi.

      I have a suggestion, hope you find it useful.

      I use a compressor when recording, between the instrument pickup (whether a DI box, a Mike Pre-Amp or any widget) or when recording instruments direct-to-audio input.

      Why? I've found that sometimes, those pesky peaks which don't make up for any meaningful information in terms of integrity of the signal are not so needed. Therefore be compressed. Not as much as slamming the signal flat (only if you need it like that, perhaps) but to accomodate a much usable RMS recording level which in turns make up for a "loudly recorded" track.

      It turns out that when you have all those peaks even out, mixing is being done with faders at the middle, you avoid getting to the noise floor, output master is at a higher perceived listening level, and mastering is less complex because of less peaks to even out in order to bring your finished mix to the all ever elusive 'close-to-0dB' notch.

      Or, well, like, that's my point of view of it.

      Hope it helps!

      Ky.
      <div class="signaturecontainer">I do not intend to rant @ my gear, it's a useless, conceited excercise... better hear the results. Probable hearing damage warning: may bother your ears, but if you must, then go http://www.soundclick.com/joeykaye<br />
      <br />
      &quot;Heavy are the mountains, But that changes with the passage of time&quot;<br />
      R. Ayanami</div>

      Comment


      • Although I had MY last mastering done out-of house (by DRT Mastering),

        I currently use Cool Edit Pro.

        After making a stereo submix....
        run the frequency band splitter and sub-divide your program material into three or four bands.

        After that...copmress or limit each channel accordingly(and mute the original). You will then have a beautifully mastered mix
        that will sound kick-ass in your car, your house, your boat and your A & R Rep's office.

        Love,
        Pimpadeus

        p.s. I also agree with everything mentioned in the original post....
        but if you're broke now or don't need professional services for your demo....
        consider the above...........and pm me with any other cheap/ high-quality mastering methods.....I have achieved sonically atounding results with guerilla tactics.
        <div class="signaturecontainer">need new music in your life?<br />
        check out<br />
        <a href="http://tss.vonzell.net" target="_blank"> Third Stone South </a></div>

        Comment


        • I do a lot of mastering where i'm from and i find that i only end up getting into multiband compression when i am "saving" a mix.

          The best material i've mastered has required little EQ, one limiter, and the master sounds like a louder version of the original mix. It's very transparent...

          It's not that multiband compression doesn't have a place in mastering because it totally can depending onyour taste. You'll find that when you use it you will depart from the original mix. It has a tendancy to thin out the mix as the high end takes off on you.

          Something fun to try with multiband is to use less bands to start off. Try setting the bass band from 20hz to 315hz and the upper band for the rest. You can do some wild things with the bass that can get you into a lot of trouble but sure sounds fun. Mess with the bands frequencies as well and slide them around listening to what your compressing. I sometimes use a mutiband plugin as a tool to listen to what the bottom end is doing.

          Also be careful when you are limiting the hell out of something as the punch in your bottom end will dissapear.


          :thu:

          -Terry


          ps. If you're bored check out this site. www.thirdpersonview.com
          and go to the physicslaborator link. I mixed these songs and mastered all of them with only a limiter and a bit of EQ.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Pimpadeus
            Although I had MY last mastering done out-of house (by DRT Mastering),

            I currently use Cool Edit Pro.

            After making a stereo submix....
            run the frequency band splitter and sub-divide your program material into three or four bands.

            After that...copmress or limit each channel accordingly(and mute the original). You will then have a beautifully mastered mix
            that will sound kick-ass in your car, your house, your boat and your A & R Rep's office.

            Love,
            Pimpadeus

            p.s. I also agree with everything mentioned in the original post....
            but if you're broke now or don't need professional services for your demo....
            consider the above...........and pm me with any other cheap/ high-quality mastering methods.....I have achieved sonically atounding results with guerilla tactics.


            One or, like, well, maybe two questions:
            Is CEP freeware or something?
            How does it fare against the multiband limiter in T-Racks 24? (consider you can also customize crossover points by means of a text file, but uh I haven't tried myself as of yet since actual tuning is fine with me).

            I've read other posts over what is done with multiband compression, but I can't imagine what would it do to enhance my crappy DIY projects to compensate for a lack of a better recording technique and recording gear. mmm I guess I should be listening your music so I can see the whats-when-wheres of it, Right?

            Well, C-ya... Don't wanna be ya!

            Ky
            <div class="signaturecontainer">I do not intend to rant @ my gear, it's a useless, conceited excercise... better hear the results. Probable hearing damage warning: may bother your ears, but if you must, then go http://www.soundclick.com/joeykaye<br />
            <br />
            &quot;Heavy are the mountains, But that changes with the passage of time&quot;<br />
            R. Ayanami</div>

            Comment


            • Well, I'm done listening to your stuff Third Stone South ... pretty interesting. But it sounds like a professional studio-recorded thing to me. Do you mind telling me how did you record it? well it seems I'm getting a little OOT, but if you don't mind enlightning someone please do.

              Cheers!

              Ky.

              PS: By the way, "Dr. Bacardi"... I liked a lot... a pretty intense piano performace.
              <div class="signaturecontainer">I do not intend to rant @ my gear, it's a useless, conceited excercise... better hear the results. Probable hearing damage warning: may bother your ears, but if you must, then go http://www.soundclick.com/joeykaye<br />
              <br />
              &quot;Heavy are the mountains, But that changes with the passage of time&quot;<br />
              R. Ayanami</div>

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Pimpadeus
                Although I had MY last mastering done out-of house (by DRT Mastering),

                I currently use Cool Edit Pro.

                After making a stereo submix....
                run the frequency band splitter and sub-divide your program material into three or four bands.

                After that...copmress or limit each channel accordingly(and mute the original). You will then have a beautifully mastered mix
                that will sound kick-ass in your car, your house, your boat and your A & R Rep's office.

                Love,
                Pimpadeus



                I tried this technique on the weekend - IT WORKS WONDERS!!
                My previously dull tracks were brought to life thanks to this post!
                <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.januaryscar.com/rig-002.jpg" target="_blank">Rig</a> <br />
                <a href="http://www.januaryscar.com" target="_blank">My Band's Website</a> <br />
                <a href="http://www.myspace.com/januaryscar" target="_blank">My Band's MySpace</a> <a href="http://www.purevolume.com/januaryscar" target="_blank">My Band's Purevolume</a> </div>

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Kiyoshi_Masamun


                  One or, like, well, maybe two questions:
                  Is CEP freeware or something?
                  How does it fare against the multiband limiter in T-Racks 24? (consider you can also customize crossover points by means of a text file, but uh I haven't tried myself as of yet since actual tuning is fine with me).

                  I've read other posts over what is done with multiband compression, but I can't imagine what would it do to enhance my crappy DIY projects to compensate for a lack of a better recording technique and recording gear. mmm I guess I should be listening your music so I can see the whats-when-wheres of it, Right?

                  Well, C-ya... Don't wanna be ya!

                  Ky


                  "Well, I'm done listening to your stuff Third Stone South ... pretty interesting. But it sounds like a professional studio-recorded thing to me. Do you mind telling me how did you record it? well it seems I'm getting a little OOT, but if you don't mind enlightning someone please do."

                  Cheers!
                  Ky

                  _______________________________


                  Hey Man,

                  I really appreciate you listening to the record and I now have a few minutes to detail its technical aspects.

                  A. The album was recorded in 1998 by me and my partners at my home studio in Louisiana.

                  B. It was recorded on a Tascam 238S 8-track analog cassette recorder with a 133 mhz computer synchronized to it for midi.(and some digital audio)

                  C. Most of the drums were programmed via Voyetra software and output to a Roland R-8 drum machine.

                  D. The most expensive microphone we had back then was an AKG C-1000.
                  The rest were 57s and 58s.

                  E. All the digital and piano songs were written and programmed by us on Voyetra and Finale software and output to an Alesis QS-6.

                  F. It was mixed on an older Peavey Mark3 board.

                  G. It was mixed in stereo to a DCC recorder (those never really took off-did they?)

                  H. Finally...it was mastered by David Torrey at DRT Mastering and duplicated by Oasis.


                  Nowdays we use nicer tools....but damn..we had a lot of fun making that record. It was our first.

                  You know what's funny?
                  I actually discovered T-Racks just a few weeks ago and I really like it. I am not sure it competes with manual seperation, but it is MUCH faster and easier!

                  AND>>>>>>>>

                  NO. CEP is not free but it was relatively inexpensive and I like it. Much the same could be done on most stereo .wav editors I would imagine.

                  ALSO...thanks for the love on Dr. Bacardi! It has a special place in my heart. It was nicknamed after me and my Alcohol Of Choice at the time and turned in as a composition project at music school.

                  In ADDITION: I enjoyed your tunes (ky)at Soundclick. They are all in Spanish...so I couldn't understand the words but I could dig the feeling! Let us be international friends. E-mail me anytime.


                  JANUARYSCAR....you will really dig this link...(according to your avatar)
                  http://www.4q.cc/chuck/index.php?topthirty



                  BTW...Thanks for all the e-mails regarding this record (CD). I truly enjoy being a part of this community!

                  PIMPADEUS
                  <div class="signaturecontainer">need new music in your life?<br />
                  check out<br />
                  <a href="http://tss.vonzell.net" target="_blank"> Third Stone South </a></div>

                  Comment


                  • Hi again, Pimpadeus!

                    Thanks for the enlightening. I just have one question left... Did you have a 'dedicated' engineer for the recording-mixing etc. or you guys were on your own to mix it? It sounds, as I said before, professional.

                    Wow, man. I've always shied away from Shures for no particular reason. This sounds great. Then again I think of my own feeble attempts of "doing it on my own". The results show...

                    ... anyway, thanks for spinning by my music page at Sound Click. As you may notice, everything is done at my house; it surely sounds home-brewed. To this date my biggest achievement has to be 'taming' this little beast T-Racks 24, which has made me think of mastering on a different light. As a matter of fact, I thought it was quite another thing, not what it really is. I like it because it provides you with basic templates to shape the sound of the music, as opposed to working within Cubase SX in a mastering session where you actually have to start from scratch since you have to pick the tools yourself to have the job done. So no info regarding the subject is to be found in the manuals, even being there a template. Of course, you can actually start from scratch, if that suits you. I find it necessary after long hours experimenting with templates.

                    Then there's the user manual which gives more details of what mastering is supposed to be for. And the ability of tweaking the whole thing on the fly just like the pros do on analog gear, instead of the "one-pass-ultra-fast" mastering the program does. Just to make you feel a little like "The Real Mc Coy".

                    My only wish would be wether the thingie could connect to control surfaces via MIDI just like the recording software, so you can actually use both of your hands instead of a shaky mouse. One plus might be a sizeable interface, since not everyone works with a 800x600 screen size anymore, I guess.

                    Well, time to go back and make some noise! Feel free to mail me at lerxst@starmedia.com anytime.

                    Cheers, Dude!

                    BTW, that Chuck Norris link made me ROTFL. For real XD

                    "Chuck norris can touch MC Hammer..."
                    ...but he'd go "Norris Time!" with a roundhouse
                    <div class="signaturecontainer">I do not intend to rant @ my gear, it's a useless, conceited excercise... better hear the results. Probable hearing damage warning: may bother your ears, but if you must, then go http://www.soundclick.com/joeykaye<br />
                    <br />
                    &quot;Heavy are the mountains, But that changes with the passage of time&quot;<br />
                    R. Ayanami</div>

                    Comment


                    • Hey Ky,

                      Thanks again for the props....but no: it wasn't engineered or mixed by anyone but us. To be fair...we were operating a semi-professional mobile recording operation out of my house for some time before finishing our own CD...so maybe we WERE semi-professional engineers by then. Sounds good to me.

                      Actually, my partner and I have always taken turns engineering for one another.
                      (Thanks JB)


                      My advice: Find a dedicated friend to help you throughout your musical endeavors. They can encourage you even when you hate yourself.
                      (much like quitting smoking with someone)

                      Anyway..to keep this post on thread..
                      I am currently studying mastering at a local college and we have a mid-term project coming up.

                      The instructor wants us to outline the benefits and details of a piece of mastering hardware or software.

                      Any suggestions?

                      Anyone.......


                      Buhler?????

                      Buhler??????

                      Love,
                      Pimpadeus
                      <div class="signaturecontainer">need new music in your life?<br />
                      check out<br />
                      <a href="http://tss.vonzell.net" target="_blank"> Third Stone South </a></div>

                      Comment


                      • Excellent article by Dave Moulton on Mastering
                        Enjoy-

                        http://www.izotope.com/artists/dave_moulton.asp
                        <div class="signaturecontainer"><b>Press<i> 'Play, Record, Stop, Rewind, Fast Forward.'</i> But seriously ... even a Gearslutz monkey can operate it!<br />
                        <br />
                        ~fuggedaboudit!~ <br />
                        <br />
                        ~skygod~</b></div>

                        Comment


                        • Mix books has a really good book on mastering.

                          "The Mastering Engineers handbook."

                          It's something like $25 at you favorite online book stores. Or you could get it and "The Mixing Engineers Handbook" for about $45.

                          They are both good reads and the mastering book has a whole section on Surround Mastering.

                          Comment


                          • See the keynote speakers' discussions at the SMR 2003 On-line show report

                            http://www.smr-home-theatre.org/surround2001/hardware/image_15.shtml

                            Enjoy-
                            <div class="signaturecontainer"><b>Press<i> 'Play, Record, Stop, Rewind, Fast Forward.'</i> But seriously ... even a Gearslutz monkey can operate it!<br />
                            <br />
                            ~fuggedaboudit!~ <br />
                            <br />
                            ~skygod~</b></div>

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Pimpadeus
                              ....but no: it wasn't engineered or mixed by anyone but us. To be fair...we were operating a semi-professional mobile recording operation out of my house for some time before finishing our own CD...so maybe we WERE semi-professional engineers by then. Sounds good to me.

                              Actually, my partner and I have always taken turns engineering for one another.
                              (Thanks JB)


                              My advice: Find a dedicated friend to help you throughout your musical endeavors. They can encourage you even when you hate yourself.
                              (much like quitting smoking with someone)

                              ...to keep this post on thread..
                              I am currently studying mastering at a local college and we have a mid-term project coming up.

                              The instructor wants us to outline the benefits and details of a piece of mastering hardware or software.

                              Any suggestions?

                              Anyone.......

                              Love,
                              Pimpadeus


                              Thanks again for the info... now maybe I see why my recordings are so... amateur... I need a BIG induction on recording tchniques, plus something different than this "hobbyst" stuff I have to record with... well probably I could do better if I just keep on reading you guys!!! mehehehehe I might learn more mehehehe

                              Now, on your homework, it seems like a hard task, but hell, I say "no pain-no gain". But as I understand, you're gonna need to go and get a hardware mastering thingie and actually write about it... mmm sounds expensively temptating...

                              I remember someone in a HC post recommending some other mastering gear, but I need to find it... so as soon as I find it, I'll put a a link towards it...

                              Meantime, keep it up!

                              Cheers, dude.
                              <div class="signaturecontainer">I do not intend to rant @ my gear, it's a useless, conceited excercise... better hear the results. Probable hearing damage warning: may bother your ears, but if you must, then go http://www.soundclick.com/joeykaye<br />
                              <br />
                              &quot;Heavy are the mountains, But that changes with the passage of time&quot;<br />
                              R. Ayanami</div>

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by jazznfunk
                                uuh! great topic!

                                I will ask You all about sample rates, how do You prefer to do:

                                1) Record (or create on VSTi) all material in highest possible Sample Rate (SR) (in case, that final product will be, say CD (16/44.1) and all procesing will be in digital domain (no transfer to analog tapes to get "warmth") on mastering stage too. And during mastering session resample it down to 44.1

                                or

                                2) Record/create all in the same SR that will be final product (44.1 to CD, 48 to DVD, 96/192 to DVD-A. 512 to SACD )

                                I prefer 2)


                                Thax!


                                Plug-ins do sound better in 24 bit. I think it's best to keep everything at the highest quality until the last step, unless processing power or hard drive space is limited. I've been recording at 32 bit/96k. Then I run the 32 bit audio through the analog mastering chain into a second computer at 16/44.1 so there's no dithering or sample rate conversion. If you stay digital through the entire process, I still think it's worth it to start at 32 or 24 bit and use a good program to dither before burning the CD.
                                <div class="signaturecontainer">Greg Blaisdell<br />
                                <br />
                                Studio Engineer - Musician - Pro Audio Sales<br />
                                <a href="http://www.proaudiotoys.com/" target="_blank">www.proaudiotoys.com</a><br />
                                <a href="http://www.rackrecording.com/" target="_blank">www.rackrecording.com</a><br />
                                Toll Free: 1-866-485-6649</div>

                                Comment

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