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  • #76
    Originally posted by Dr. Strange


    7. How much does mastering cost?

    Most high end facilities will end up charging between $400-600 dollars for a mastering job taking around 4-8 hours.


    More like $350-500 an HOUR.
    Bass Rig
    Dunlop Gator Grip 1.14 --> Schecter Stilleto Custom-5 Nat --> Line 6 POD Pro --> Carvin DCM 1500 --> (Need new cab)

    Guitar Rig
    Dunlop Jazz III Blacks --> 2006 MIM Fender Tele --> Empress Multidrive --> ISP Decimator --> EHX .44 Magnum --> Port City 1x12OS Wave Custom w/ Eminence Legend V12

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by jaeger82


      More like $350-500 an HOUR.


      I hear you there...

      I once had an album mastered at a high end facility for around $600...

      In the late 80's...

      And they did a $hitty job...

      That's actually how I got started.
      John Scrip Massive Mastering
      Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

      MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
      And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

      Comment


      • #78
        Ok, so I was told to read this thread to find the answer to my problem, and after reading all the posts (which are awesome by the way, but mostly over my head), I'm still confused.

        Can anyone explain to me, in layman's terms, how to get the final level on my songs up to 0dB, or at least something close. When I bounce tracks to disk in Pro Tools (even when the master volume is at 0dB) they always come out really quiet. What can I do about this? I have no money to speak of, so I was hoping for a free or amazingly cheap solution. Do I need software like T-Racks, or can I do it in Pro-Tools? Any help would be great, Thanks!

        Comment


        • #79
          In a nutshell, you can do pretty decent sweetening in ProTools.

          Without going into technique, start out with [EQ -> compressor -> EQ -> limiter] across the master buss.

          After that, it's all up to your ears.

          And although it really doesn't get into technique, Bob Katz's "Mastering Audio" is a pretty good book.
          John Scrip Massive Mastering
          Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

          MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
          And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by (nice_dream)
            Can anyone explain to me, in layman's terms, how to get the final level on my songs up to 0dB, or at least something close. When I bounce tracks to disk in Pro Tools (even when the master volume is at 0dB) they always come out really quiet. What can I do about this? I have no money to speak of, so I was hoping for a free or amazingly cheap solution. Do I need software like T-Racks, or can I do it in Pro-Tools? Any help would be great, Thanks!


            Use a digital limiter to make it hot.

            About the money issue, im not really sure why I put those numbers down , but it really does depend on a case by case basis...some people charge low and do a really good job, others charge a lot and suck...listen to previous work...

            Comment


            • #81
              Use a digital limiter to make it hot.

              Use a digital limiter if you can't figure out how to do it the right way.
              John Scrip Massive Mastering
              Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

              MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
              And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

              Comment


              • #82
                We're a band on the verge of releasing our 2nd full-length... Dr. Strange, do you want to master it? email me

                Josh/Crimson
                ~one rock show can
                change the world~

                Comment


                • #83
                  If he doesn't, I might know a place...

                  I'm such a whore...
                  John Scrip Massive Mastering
                  Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

                  MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
                  And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Do you have favorite reference CD's for various genres for when you're mixing/mastering?
                    Electronic Music fan

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Yes and no - I have my own faves for checking out speakers, testing my setup, etc. Mostly stuff that most have never heard of. Also some tracks I've done here that have certain "qualities" or "anomalies" in them that I want to make sure I and the gear are still sensitive to.

                      I encourage clients to send ME a reference for mastering - If there's a particular sound that they're trying to emulate, I want to hear it. Some projects can go in several different directions. I want to go in the direction that the CLIENT wants to go in whenever possible. Most will send just a couple tracks of something - I don't even care if they say who it is. If that's the sonud they want, that's the sound I shoot for. Sometimes it's just not going to happen, but at least we're all on the same page.
                      John Scrip Massive Mastering
                      Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

                      MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
                      And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        I use several reference CD's: Megadeth for metal, Kenny wayne shepard for blues, and Beatles for the more vintage stuff.
                        Monthly Podcast: http://fuzzballrecordsradio.tk/

                        Or Quixotic Rage myspace info here

                        Band web page: http://JMBess.googlepages.com/home

                        Studio web page:http://JMBess.googlepages.com/fuzzballrecords

                        Great trades with: Stazinish, Silverring233, sirkonks, Facing Failure, yuantian, simplestargazer, Juan M, jcloud, and you can check my ebay account for more!

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Hi,

                          I haven't read the whole thread, I'm planning to do it but slowly because is kind of long. I have some questions, since it seems some guys around here have a clue of what their talking. It is Product related, but maybe you have some experience with some of this products and will help me to make a decision:

                          I'm planning to buy a Roland VS-2000CD (maybe a VS-2400CD, but don't know if the extra price tag is worth it in comparison with the 2000CD). My goal is to record my Band and see what do I have to do to sell some CDs. We play worship at a 1,000 people church and many people already asked us when will we make a CD. So, lets say that we are planning to reproduce first hand 500 CDs and see what happens. We are planning to do some other songs and send them to some Radio Stations and some Labels just to see what happens. We have no expectation of becomming "Rock-Stars" or anything like that, is just we have some material and we are thinking what can we do with it and sending it some places doesn't costs much.

                          So, like you imagine, we don't have a big budget..... or lets say a very limited budget. We need to still buy some equipment for our band but we have already some good gear.

                          So we are thinking of buying this product (Roland VS-2000CD) but I don't know where my limits are going to be ? I'm planning to use 24-bit.

                          0) What should I expect from such a product ? (don't want to have the wrong expectations and waste my money, and if your point-of-view-expectations-list doesn't meet my expectations, I better don't buy it, right?!)

                          1) Can I do a decent Recording with it (or some similar product)?
                          2) Can I do a decent Mixing with it ?

                          Lets say I have good ears and do a "decent" Recording and Mixing and spend some 500 Dollars for mastering 8-10 songs (is that at all posible ? how much should I calculate per song -normal lenght- ?)

                          3) What kind of quality (from 1 to 10, 10 being best) is my CD going to have ?...... yeah, lets say I got some decent mastering as well...

                          4) What kind of qualitiy (1-10) will I have if I do the mastering my self with this product ?

                          5) I know I can burn my CD with this product, but can I burn my CD from such a product and have it ready for "mass production" (or burn some copies to send them and give to friends) ? I mean ready to pack and give away ?

                          6) Where should I invest more money:

                          6.1) in a better Digital Recorder (lets say the VS-2400CD) ?
                          6.2) in Mastering plugins for my Digital Recorder?
                          6.3) in Mastering in a Studio ?

                          OK, it will be great if somebody can give me a clue before I invest in something that will only frustrate me at the end of all my efforts. Thanks!
                          Take care, JC.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Here I go I will help where I can.

                            1) Yes the recording quality is great, they even used the unit for some of the lord of the rings soundtracks. Roland recorders are usualy worth the money. I dont know much about the new 2000 unit but I know the other one vs-2400 cd is very good.

                            2) yes, just remember learning how to record takes some time, so you may need some time to experiment.

                            3) That depends on your recording ability (talent). The unit should give you a 10 in quality if you use it right.

                            4) That also depends on your talent, time, and effort. I have done good masters on cheaper units, it mainly depends on how much time you are willing to spend. I think you should be fine with the unit.

                            5) The unit records in red book format (the required format, this is exactualy what you need, I would make a few copies off of the roland then produce them off of your computer. I would recomend a plextor cd burner for your computer that should cost around $100. I wouldent want to do a 1000 copies off of the roland it wasent built for mass production.

                            6) This one depends on your current gear and talent, if you are willling to spend time and some money on monitors you may be able to do the whole projet yourself.

                            I hope I was able to help, if you need more clarifacation or more answers I will be happy to try and help. Good luck.
                            Monthly Podcast: http://fuzzballrecordsradio.tk/

                            Or Quixotic Rage myspace info here

                            Band web page: http://JMBess.googlepages.com/home

                            Studio web page:http://JMBess.googlepages.com/fuzzballrecords

                            Great trades with: Stazinish, Silverring233, sirkonks, Facing Failure, yuantian, simplestargazer, Juan M, jcloud, and you can check my ebay account for more!

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              It's 90% EAR and 10% GEAR.

                              I've heard wonderful "world-class" recordings done on Behringer units in people's bedrooms and I've heard horrific audio monstrosities recorded in amazing multi-million dollar facilities.

                              The key - The ABSOLUTE key, is to have the SOURCE sounding as good as possible. The talent, and the talent's sound, will dictate everything else.

                              As an example, I do a lot of live/theatrical audio - On the occasion that I'm mixing FOH, the artist will sometimes ask for a board recording. I'm pretty happy to do so. I'm using whatever is there - An Allen-Heath 2200, a stack of 58's and 57's, you know - Nothing extraordinary. The thing is, these recordings sound wonderful - World-class artists have world-class sound and abilities. After that, of course, better mics, preamps, yada, yada are going to make improvements. However, great sound tends to stay great without a lot of effort.

                              On mastering - I don't even master my own mixes. I personally think it's the worst thing you can do. Mastering, among other things, is the last check for anomalies - If they got by you the first time, they'll get by you the second. However, if you're going the DIY route, at the very least - WAIT for several days to "distance" yourself from the recording, and preferably use different monitoring in a different room. Familiarity is evil. If your studio monitors are a little too bright, you're likely going to dull the tracks down no fewer than THREE TIMES along the course of the project. Do you really want to make the final decision on those same monitors?
                              John Scrip Massive Mastering
                              Chicago (Schaumburg / Hoffman Est.), IL - USA

                              MASSIVE Mastering -- johnscrip.com
                              And mucking up the Mastering forum at StudioForums.com

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                It starts with triggering kiks and snares in the studio mix and progresses to
                                adding Ultramax to everything in the usual evrything louder than everything else stylee but if you let it breath you wont be working in the rock dance or
                                hip hop fields. Its not usually done by more than 5.3 db as obvious distortion on a rock band mix comes at about 5.9 on an Ultramaximiser but thats only after you have taken about 2.5 Db at most frequencys with a C4. After all
                                the bloke you are dealing with is one of lifes failures he wasn't good enough to get a deal himself and he is in the most insecure job in the world along with football managers. Even if your band knows exactly what they want to sound like. You are getting and paying for a producer with a track record.
                                This is because the A&R guy needs someone to blame.
                                Lets be nice to A&R guys cos there scared silly.
                                Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
                                http://www.springvalestudios.com

                                Comment



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