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  • #46
    1. Clean your ears regularly.
    2. Don't watch loud concerts often.
    3. Buy not just decent but HIGH QUALITY MONITORS that offer flat response.
    4. Listen to A LOT of songs and take note of the final mastering and try to copy the timbre and tone of those you like.
    Proud to be an ASH Soul... (Souls of the Amp Simulator Haters Club)... Spread the HATE!

    (But the Axe-FX makes me think about changing my sig.)

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    • #47
      very nice post!
      www.guitarbeam.tk - some free guitar lessons www.geocities.com/guitarbeam/index.htm

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      • #48
        Here is a link to some interesting docs I found on another group. They are published by Isotope, the manufacturers of Ozone. However, the pdf on mastering is a pretty good primer for those who want to simply "do it themselves".

        http://www.izotope.com/products/audio/ozone/ozoneguide.html

        Tom

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        • #49
          Dr Strange,

          thanks for your tips on mastering, i am currently in the middle of my first mastering assignment and it helped a lot.
          Why be difficult...when with a little more effort you can be bloody impossible.

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          • #50
            What is the ideal mastering environment? I have a spare room in my house that I could convert to a specific mastering room if the wind carried me. I'm gonna turn my basement into a sound-treated (as pro as possible) studio during the summer, and I still have some cash to blow. Anyone know about this?

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            • #51
              The "ideal environment" would be your best combination of room acoustics and monitoring chain. If you're referring to how dead or live should the room be, that is usually a matter of personal preference but generally shouldnt be too much of either. However, realistically speaking, unless you have a lot of cash left over, setting up an entirely separate mastering room of any quality is probably not a good idea (it costs a lot! ).

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              • #52
                Well I could toss up to 2k in the room, and then grab equipment. I'd learn it all myself which I'm giving myself about 6 months to do. Basically what I'm doing is like going to recording school, just spending my money on gear instead of schooling. I've got loans and everything in the works.

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                • #53
                  We finished recording and mixing a CD and have been pretty happy with the sound that we got. We recorded it in our city with some help from a guy we know who works at a studio. He

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                  • #54
                    Mastering is not necessarily about using compression, eq, limiting...it's about knowing when to make changes and how to probably do such changes. Sometimes no additional processing is needed, if the mixes sound good already by all means release them as they are. There's no need to change the sound if its already how you want it.

                    But just a note, you may also consider having a third party (someone not involved in the recording/mixing) listen as well to give you an additional perspective.

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                    • #55
                      When you compress a stereo mix as a part of the mastering, do you always use multibandcompressor? If not, when do you use a ordinary compressor?
                      Beethoven had a nice hairstyle

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                      • #56
                        Well personally I try to stay away from multiband as much as possible. Multiband compressors are usually used for "save jobs" when a great deal of tweaking is required. An ordinary compressor is used for changing the overall dynamic range or sound of a whole song or select parts. Just FYI pretty much all "mastering quality" compressors are NOT multiband...those are usually found in software plug-in form.

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                        • #57
                          What settings do you use when you compress a standard rocksong? (with a standard compressor, not multiband). Peak compression right? And then?
                          Beethoven had a nice hairstyle

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                          • #58
                            Do anybody knows if there is a VST plug in that can help me mastering my songs? No professional, just demo quality!
                            Till Next Time - ICQ 7101269
                            feel free to add

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Lemao
                              Do anybody knows if there is a VST plug in that can help me mastering my songs? No professional, just demo quality!


                              As someone doing home demo type stuff, I'd recommend Steinberg Mastering Edition. It's a collection of VST plugins that cover EQ, compression, etc. The Loudness Maximiser is well cool.

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                              • #60
                                Hi all... This has been a fabulous thread!

                                Can anyone please explain to me the major differences between a "Mixing" room and a "Mastering" room? Is it only the amount and type of gear in the room, or is it also spatial dimensions and and accoustical response?

                                Are there other differences besides those two?

                                Thanks in advance!
                                A.P.S.

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