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  • #16
    I am very skeptical about 'proffesional mastering'. The stuff that has been comming out of the major labels for the last two years sounds like all you have to do is turn it up until it is clipping, hit it with a limiter set on like ten, and then further suck the life out with a massive V shaped eq. When its done they may as well have done it with radio shack mics and one of those Boss digital recorders because it sounds that bad. Honestly, a vinyl record has more dynamic range than today's crap. Mastering should polish a good mix, not destroy it.
    "It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he
    was never reasoned into."- Jonathan Swift

    "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself."- Leo Tolstoy

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    • #17
      I would have to think it depends on your market. Creed demographics are way different than Jazz lovers. And its not the mastering engineers behind loudnes as much as the record companies. Sure, some almost get high, or make it a game to see how loud they can pump out a CD but they are just following orders.

      I still dont think loud is really bad for some styles of music. It really depends on who the customer is. Has anyone ever tried to play a classical CD in a convertable on the freeway?

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      • #18
        great post!!!!!

        Words are like bullets; if they escape, you can’t catch them again.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by iandawg
          I am very skeptical about 'proffesional mastering'. The stuff that has been comming out of the major labels for the last two years sounds like all you have to do is turn it up until it is clipping, hit it with a limiter set on like ten, and then further suck the life out with a massive V shaped eq. When its done they may as well have done it with radio shack mics and one of those Boss digital recorders because it sounds that bad. Honestly, a vinyl record has more dynamic range than today's crap. Mastering should polish a good mix, not destroy it.


          Sadly, what you say is oftentimes true. The fact is, the reason why some mastering engineers choose to squash things is because thats what many people believe sells. However, there are still very many "pros" out there that are still doing good work out there.

          For example, check out this thread where Brad Blackwood among others spend some time calling out the "mastering mafia". Its pretty entertaining, and offers some insight into the ME world.

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          • #20
            p.s. One other thing, why does it hurt when I pee... ?


            Are you tired of the constant drip, drip, drip of gonhorrea? If so, try new Peter-Rooter

            ** Peter Roote, that's the name. Just flush your troubles down the drain. **

            ** Peter Rooter **
            ** Peter Rooter **

            -Dan.
            Well, I've been to one world fair, a picnic, and a rodeo, and that's the stupidest thing I ever heard come over a set of earphones.

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            • #21
              Personal Website: LANSTARR.COM * Band: DirtyBathWater.com

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              • #22
                Qual-a-tee

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                • #23
                  exellent tread, keep up the good work, I'm actually doing my own thing right now, rec, mix, and mastering and i have to admit it's not done over night but the more i practice the closer i get to my dreams, but i find the mastering part the hardest to accomplish, i know a mastering engineeer would be the best thing but i'm willing to try and try untill i get to my goals, thanks for inspiring me even more in realising this beautiful thing called "" MUSIC"".

                  Frenchy.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by greggybud
                    Has anyone ever tried to play a classical CD in a convertable on the freeway?


                    ummm..... yes?

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                    • #25
                      This was a great post. I just wish I had seen it months ago before struggling with my own mixing and Sound Forge attempts to mastering in my home studio. The more I work, the more dead my ears become. Here some examples of my trials and errors.
                      http://barrie.iuma.com just in case you're curious.

                      I'll keep your mastering facility in mind for future projects.
                      BZ

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                      • #26
                        Just fyi, I wrote a little more as a supplement on Oz's site.

                        The article can be found here

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                        • #27
                          Okay, so I have a studio where I can record good tracks, but I lack EQing/Compression level skills. Is what your talking only include the left/right total mix? Or can I send in 11 songs that have about 17 tracks each, everything is recorded, but no EQ or compression or anything is applied to any track and have them do that?
                          1993 Gibson Les Paul w/Seymour Duncan Antiquities
                          1967 Fender Bassman Blackface Head
                          1996 Vox AC15 2x10 Combo

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                          • #28
                            Applying EQ and compression to individual tracks should be left to the mixer. Mastering processing is applied to the total stereo (or surround) mix and that's it. If you want to send your separated mixes then make sure that the engineer you're working with does mixing as well.

                            Sometimes some mastering people do "stem" mixing which is basically adjusting only the major parts (vox, guitars, drums, etc.) for volume and pannings. But this also is generally left to the mixer.

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                            • #29
                              Hi friends!
                              I would like to write some tips so as to get the most out of your nice mixes:
                              a) do not compress or limit you mix 2 buss. What I mean is, if you wantt the next person ( the mastering guy) to do a better job, leave for him the tasks of compressing and limiting. Reason 01: He will use much better gear, suited for these procedures. Reason 02: what can the mastering engineer do to something already squeezed to death?

                              b) when mixing, as most of you are finishing at 24 bits/44k or 48khz, keep a copy of the data files, be it Pro Tools, DP, Digi001/002, Nuendo, etc.

                              c) as a safe rule of thumb, keep an eye at peaks and keep things no louder than -0.2db.

                              d) with fresher ears and an improved acoustic environment, we can be able to to better judgements to the final mixes of yours.

                              I have received lots of ****************ty masters ****************ed up to death were the client just did not have the clean fat 2 mix files anymore. Decompress is quite difficult and of course you just can not bring to life what is already dead.

                              These all in one boxes like Finalizer, etc just can not predict what your masters need. The human factor is the difference.
                              also, just because you built a nice presets and it sounds bass heavy like the MTV Rapper does not mean that it will play properly on ordinary systems.

                              Next time I will talk about Level wars!

                              If you want more info into this, just drop me a call itno this nice forum
                              Hugs
                              Al
                              Alécio Costa
                              Recording engineer/music producer/Singer/composer
                              Studio Digital Performance

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                              • #30
                                ok. for people like some of us that works in a none pro comercial way, and that only some times charge people for our semi pro work, what are some basic rules in taking care of our final mixes, i mean cut below 20 for eliminate low roumble, compress a little, what else?


                                i generaly try my final mixes this way, 24/48 files:

                                1. i made fade and timing adjustments( 1 or 2 seconds betwen
                                tracks, 1 or 2 seconds start of file and the same at end.

                                2. apply some eq with waves lin eq broadband.

                                3. i try to compress a little with tracks or waves till it sound
                                a little better "i guess", but some time i pass the compression
                                thing.

                                4. resample to 44.1 with sound fore, and it use something call
                                anti alias filtering.

                                5. then bit depht conversion to 16bit with no deithering.

                                6. i use waves L2 to set levels at -0.2 (very simply to use, i
                                never really over limit my stuff) and deithering.

                                7. burn, and hear it in my SUV (truck), and maybe star over again.


                                Can you mastering people help us a little.

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