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  • roland v drums and other brands...etc..

    I don't want to mess with buying an acoustic kit, having to tune it, change heads and the space it takes up, at least right now. but I want to have a couple of great drummers I know play on the stuff I record. I've heard some recordings with the mid to top of the line roland vdrums, and they sound good to me. They don't always sound great coming through an amp, but it may be because when you hear drums coming from just one place it's weird.


    So what do you think of these? Any brands you prefer? They are expensive, but I like the number of different sounds you can get, and the programability.

    Thanks for your time as always. I'm going back out to my garage, to continue turning it into the studio I need.

    bford
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic" target="_blank">www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic</a><br />
    <a href="http://www.thefavoritesrock.com" target="_blank">www.thefavoritesrock.com</a><br />
    <br />
    <br />
    Life is short play a great amp.<br />
    mmmmm.....budda.........aaagghhh</div>

  • #2
    Originally posted by jbford1
    I don't want to mess with buying an acoustic kit, having to tune it, change heads and the space it takes up, at least right now. but I want to have a couple of great drummers I know play on the stuff I record. I've heard some recordings with the mid to top of the line roland vdrums, and they sound good to me. They don't always sound great coming through an amp, but it may be because when you hear drums coming from just one place it's weird.


    So what do you think of these? Any brands you prefer? They are expensive, but I like the number of different sounds you can get, and the programability.

    Thanks for your time as always. I'm going back out to my garage, to continue turning it into the studio I need.

    bford


    I'm no drummer, but if I had a couple of spare G's hanging around, I would have to buy some Vdrums.. the concept is awesome..


    Rimmer
    <div class="signaturecontainer">"(The New Testament) is a work of crude carpentry, hammered together long after its purported events, and full of improvised attempts to make things come out right." Christopher Hitchens, R.I.P</div>

    Comment


    • #3
      The drummer in my band uses some of the Roland drums. I think they sound pretty good. We recently recorded some stuff, but we didn't use the sounds of the Roland set. We instead recorded a midi file with them, and I used that to trigger Battery with the drum sounds on my computer. I think the results are pretty good. You can hear an example of this here:

      http://home.earthlink.net/~guitarjoe/IGetLonely.mp3

      Comment


      • #4
        I think they sound pretty good. We recently recorded some stuff, but we didn't use the sounds of the Roland set


        I think the Roland hardware is the best available, but I think the Roland module sounds are about the worst. I definately recommend triggering your own samples - I use LinPlug RMIII which is similar to Battery but at a reasonable price. I have the Battery 24 bit CD, but some of my best sounds are 16 bit sounds I got for free off the net (legally of course).


        Roland have an interesting pad-2-midi converter, which means you can buy this and just one pad to get you started. You can add the other controllers as you can afford them. I'm doing ok with my SPD6 at the moment, but this is what I would get if I hadn't bought that.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd have to agree with greendoor - well, maybe
          not the worst sounding, but the Kurzweil drums
          samples sound much more believable in a mix
          IMHO. You can MIDI a Kurzweil ME-1 module ($350)
          to the Roland and then pick and choose which
          sounds you want. I use the Roland bass drum
          which is a little fatter, but the rest of the sounds
          come from my PC2X.

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks for all the info!

            So am I better getting the VClub set over the VStage set, especially if I"m going to be using other drums modules? The VClub is the harder black plastic drums with the TD6 brain, and the VStage has the better feeling heads, and the TD8 brain, which uses the COSM modelling and has a lot more tweaking that can be done within. Price difference is about a thousand bucks though.

            peace,

            bford
            <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic" target="_blank">www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic</a><br />
            <a href="http://www.thefavoritesrock.com" target="_blank">www.thefavoritesrock.com</a><br />
            <br />
            <br />
            Life is short play a great amp.<br />
            mmmmm.....budda.........aaagghhh</div>

            Comment


            • #7
              A friend of mine runs a company that sells V-drum type sets outright. They are based on acoustic drums, but have the electronics and capabilities of the V-drums. They feel exactly like real drums (they are based around real drum shells and mounted on a rack)
              He has just resently started up the company, and is just about to upload his site. I've played a set, and they feel very tight and organized, he aparently runs his own set into his computer (running his own homemade acoustic drum samples) The tracks sounded as real as studio drums IMHO

              let me know if you're interested, he'd be glad to put together a custom set for you for a reasonable price

              good luck on your decision,

              Mike
              <div class="signaturecontainer">http://www.nowhereradio.com/artists/album.php?aid=1610&amp;alid=145</div>

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              • #8
                I recorded an album last summer with the v-concert set for a local group(that i later joined). You could hear samples from the whole album here, www.gruporival.com , the drums sound decent but with the same money I would have rather gone with a new drumset, drum mics and cymbals. When they bought them the v-drums were around 3600$.

                Comment


                • #9
                  cool, I'll check it out.. thanks for the input.

                  does anyone have feelings on the difference between the vclub and the vstage sets??? the vstage are the newer version of the vcustoms.

                  bford
                  <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic" target="_blank">www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic</a><br />
                  <a href="http://www.thefavoritesrock.com" target="_blank">www.thefavoritesrock.com</a><br />
                  <br />
                  <br />
                  Life is short play a great amp.<br />
                  mmmmm.....budda.........aaagghhh</div>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just missed one thing here: Ddrum!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                    I have a V-drum setup, but my drummodule is a Ddrum4. It's the only drummodule with real recorded drumsounds. This means that the sounds are not produced by programming a computer but by very high-end recording drumsounds of real acoustic kits.

                    You can also download all kind of drumsets/sounds from the Ddrumsite.
                    It works great for me!!!!!!!!!
                    Sometimes fast drumbeats (I can't come up with the english word) don't come through, but.... hey, in the digital world we can edit everything.

                    So remember: Ddrum for the sounds (in my opion)


                    Indie.

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                    • #11
                      IMHO: V-drums are very nice and fun but if you want a professional sounding kit built like a tank that feels and sounds like a real drum kit go for Ddrum4. Just check out the list of pro's that use it. The latest one comes with celebrity drum kit sounds from the likes of Dennis chambers etc.

                      The standard Ddrum4 kit is only small but if you compare the price with the v-drum you can just about buy 2 Ddrums for the same price.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        yes, I do think about getting an acoustic set still, but i'm just not sure. Mainly I'll be doing rock songs, or as my friend calls my music alternativepoprock.... but there will be some country and acoustic music done here also. I know you can eq acoustic drums, and tune them differently, but you still get the basic sound of the kit, and as long as that kit sounds great, then you are cool, but if it's not, then you can usually get a better sound from an electric kit.... at least from the instances I have seen.

                        I'd love to have both, or a few awesome acoustic kits, but that can't happen.

                        bford
                        <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic" target="_blank">www.myspace.com/thefavoritesmusic</a><br />
                        <a href="http://www.thefavoritesrock.com" target="_blank">www.thefavoritesrock.com</a><br />
                        <br />
                        <br />
                        Life is short play a great amp.<br />
                        mmmmm.....budda.........aaagghhh</div>

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Don't forget the 3rd option...
                          Mike the kit the best you can (spend the countless
                          hours and dollars getting the micing just right - there
                          really isn't anything like a well miked kit) then...
                          Buy some cheap Radio Shack Piezo transducers,
                          tape them to your drum heads, use them to trigger
                          your favorite drum brain (or just record them to a
                          sequencer so you can adjust sounds later).
                          This way you can use the stark realism of the acoustics
                          (making your drummer happy) and add in as much or
                          as little of the electronic drums to suit your taste.
                          The best part of this setup is that you can experiment
                          with as many sounds as you can come up with -
                          sometimes just a touch of an otherwise over-the-top
                          dance mix bass drum will fill out your slightly weak
                          in the knees acoustic bass.
                          A drawback (or added bonus depending on how you
                          look at it) is that the dynamics of an acoustic set will
                          never match the dynamics of an electronic set perfectly.
                          This causes some really interesting stereo effects when
                          acoustic and electronic sounds are panned slightly
                          off center from each other.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            $0.02

                            We have a V-Session set. Bought it used but in excellent shape for $3k.

                            We use it for recording and for our church band. Sounds great for both. Works well in a church where accoustics might be too loud.

                            Transport:
                            1 - We disconnect the kick, snare and hi-hat pedal
                            2 - fold up the drums and cymbals
                            3 - loosen the rack sides (so it can straighten and bend)
                            4 - carry in down the hall, up the stairs and outside (3 section bend and straighten so it can "snake" down the hall and around corners.)
                            5 - pull the sides in and lock them
                            6 - stick it in the truck under the shell
                            Unpack is just the opposite

                            Pros:
                            Sounds great
                            Multiple sounds
                            Quiet when it needs to be (almost no stage bleed)
                            No mics required
                            Fast setup and tear down (fold it up and put it in the truck)

                            Cons:
                            Lots of wires (put them wire holders helps a lot)
                            You do have to tune the heads (but its very easy)
                            If you have to put it into something smaller than a pickup setup and teardown will be longer than an accoustic set.

                            Overall, we are very happy with them and would do it again. Very versatile.

                            Steve

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jchas
                              Don't forget the 3rd option...
                              Mike the kit the best you can (spend the countless
                              hours and dollars getting the micing just right - there
                              really isn't anything like a well miked kit) then...
                              Buy some cheap Radio Shack Piezo transducers,
                              tape them to your drum heads, use them to trigger
                              your favorite drum brain (or just record them to a
                              sequencer so you can adjust sounds later).
                              This way you can use the stark realism of the acoustics
                              (making your drummer happy) and add in as much or
                              as little of the electronic drums to suit your taste.
                              The best part of this setup is that you can experiment
                              with as many sounds as you can come up with -
                              sometimes just a touch of an otherwise over-the-top
                              dance mix bass drum will fill out your slightly weak
                              in the knees acoustic bass.
                              A drawback (or added bonus depending on how you
                              look at it) is that the dynamics of an acoustic set will
                              never match the dynamics of an electronic set perfectly.
                              This causes some really interesting stereo effects when
                              acoustic and electronic sounds are panned slightly
                              off center from each other.


                              Can you give more details on this Piezo process? It's very interesting. How to the transducers trigger sounds later? would they have to be converted to a MIDI signal somehow?I'm just having trouble visualizing it, but it's very interesting.

                              Thanks,
                              Alex

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