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  • Your suggestions for good Flat response Monitoring speakers

    Hi guys,

    I'm on the market for some good monitors, they have to be good, but the cheapest possible.

    I'm not a pro, but would like to have a flat response from them so the EQ'ing and other stuff will really sound true, instead of having speakers like I got that boost the hell out of the bass.

    Are there any standards ? or is there any price range to have something decent with the flatest response possible ?

    thanks !!

    Simon

  • #2
    Check the Stickies at the top of the page. Lots of good info there.

    MG
    "Thank You, NASA!"

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    • #3
      M-Audio Studiophile BX8s
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      • #4
        thanks Mark for pointing me that out, I didn't notice you posted a thread concerning that stuff

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AeroB1033
          M-Audio Studiophile BX8s


          I was looking a bit into these, they seem quite great !

          I guess the difference with the BX5 is that they are 130W comparing to the BX5 that are 75W ?

          that would do that the BX8 have more headroom ?

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          • #6
            before you worry about accurate speakers you should worry about an acurate room. A room that has excessive bass problems will need treatment to hear the "flatness" of your monitors.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by EngineGuitarist
              before you worry about accurate speakers you should worry about an acurate room. A room that has excessive bass problems will need treatment to hear the "flatness" of your monitors.


              I agree that a room is important.. but oftentimes, when someone is looking for somewhat lower budget studio monitors, it costs enough just to get the monitors themselves, let alone treat the room. I am only saying this because I am a college student with a very small budget in the same kind of situation. I think that near-field monitors are a good way to help avoid EQ response problems in the room. I would personally recommend getting a second cheap pair of home speakers as a reference.. and when you finish a rough mix of your song, burn it to CD and play it in your car stereo or different stereos around the house.. or go to your buddy's house and play it on his stereo. Also, although I certainly wouldn't recommend monitoring on headphones ALL the time, I think that it can also be an effective way to hear your mix.. especially reguarding the stereo spread.
              If we could all spend the money on treating a room, the world would be a great place.. Those are just some ideas to help give yourself an accurate representation of your recording in the "real world" despite your room.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by Elements6259


                I agree that a room is important.. but oftentimes, when someone is looking for somewhat lower budget studio monitors, it costs enough just to get the monitors themselves, let alone treat the room. I am only saying this because I am a college student with a very small budget in the same kind of situation. I think that near-field monitors are a good way to help avoid EQ response problems in the room. I would personally recommend getting a second cheap pair of home speakers as a reference.. and when you finish a rough mix of your song, burn it to CD and play it in your car stereo or different stereos around the house.. or go to your buddy's house and play it on his stereo. Also, although I certainly wouldn't recommend monitoring on headphones ALL the time, I think that it can also be an effective way to hear your mix.. especially reguarding the stereo spread.
                If we could all spend the money on treating a room, the world would be a great place.. Those are just some ideas to help give yourself an accurate representation of your recording in the "real world" despite your room.


                But for monitoring and even tracking, I was suggested by many people that getting a great pair headphones was great, especially if the room is not treated. For tracking, I was told that using in ear headphones or closed back headphones minimize the click bleed (makes sense), but for monitoring, having something open backed is better sounding.

                If the monitors thing doesn't worth it, since I don't have the means to treat my bedroom (I won't maybe even stay here for many years again), the headphones could maybe be the way to go, before investing in some kind of room.

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                • #9
                  Big fan of the BX8s. I got 'em because a good friend of mine bought them and not only blew me away but a recording professional who's been in the biz for a number of years. You won't be disappointed! You usually can get them off of eBay for some pretty good prices. You can easily save yourself $50 and I remember one dealer was throwing in free shipping.

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                  • #10
                    Even listening to ruler flat monitors in the near field doesn't save you from your room modes, especially in a really small room with similar dimensions.

                    Quite a while back, I bought a pair of Mackie HR824 powered monitors. I took one to the anechoic chamber here at the university where I work, and hooked it up to our B&K analysis system. Frankly, I was really skeptical of Mackie's claim that the 824 was flat plus or minus 1dB from (if memory serves) about 40 Hz to 16kHz.

                    The results from testing in the anechoic chamber matched very closely with the strip chart Mackie provides with every monitor. The 824 really is extremely flat!

                    However, when I installed the monitors in my small control room, the measured response I got (borrowing the B&K mike from work, sorry boss) and using JBL Smaart on my home computer showed a very different story. The figure below shows the SMAART analysis for one speaker recorded at the equilateral midpoint between monitors. Note the scale on the Y axis to see how truly horrible the room response is.



                    So the answer is, there's really no shortcut. You need monitors as flat as your budget allows, and a good room to listen in carefully treated to reduce the room modes. (For advice as to the latter, see any post by Ethan Winer).

                    Otherwise, you'll be playing "guess the EQ, run out to the car, and then guess again."

                    Terry D.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sekler


                      But for monitoring and even tracking, I was suggested by many people that getting a great pair headphones was great, especially if the room is not treated. For tracking, I was told that using in ear headphones or closed back headphones minimize the click bleed (makes sense), but for monitoring, having something open backed is better sounding.

                      If the monitors thing doesn't worth it, since I don't have the means to treat my bedroom (I won't maybe even stay here for many years again), the headphones could maybe be the way to go, before investing in some kind of room.


                      I am having a very hard time with these issues myself, and I am not a knowledgeable person, other than to say that I've had my difficulties without success.

                      However, I wanted to add something that someone mentioned to me, which makes sense. With earphones, you have two separate channels and you are hearing them cleanly, but with speakers the sound combines, and that probably changes things. I'm not sure how true this is, but I thought I'd add it on.
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                      • #12
                        If you hit the lottery and can run with the big dogs... the ADAM S-3A's are the best nearfields I've ever used... however, monitors, like women and cars, are highly personal and subjective events... so what may work for me could be **************** for you...

                        Experimentation is the key here... now by experimentation I mean to get a pair into your studio, mix a couple things on them while trusting them completely... then take the product out to a HiFi shop and listen to it on like 10 different sets of "consumer" speakers.

                        If the balances and textures hold true [yeah, the midrange curve is going to change from HiFi speaker to HiFi speaker... but the balances throughout the midrange should stay pretty constant], then you've found a good mixing tool for you... if the balances and textures change from speaker to speaker... then you're still on the hunt for a set of monitors that will work best for the way you work.,

                        Best of luck with the search... it's a long and tedious road the times I've had to do that search... took me 3 years once to find a set of monitors I loved only for the company that made them to go out of business 3 years later and leave me high and dry with no spares... quite a drag to say the least... I had to go through the arduous monitor shopping process all over again [one of my least favorite things to do next to getting my finger stuck in a car door].
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MrKnobs

                          However, when I installed the monitors in my small control room, the measured response I got (borrowing the B&K mike from work, sorry boss) and using JBL Smaart on my home computer showed a very different story. The figure below shows the SMAART analysis for one speaker recorded at the equilateral midpoint between monitors. Note the scale on the Y axis to see how truly horrible the room response is.


                          Terry, I am not sure how to read this chart. I was wondering if you could help me.

                          First of all, the line isn't supposed to be all sawtoothed like that, is it? Isn't it supposed to be a fairly straight line?

                          Also, on the left hand side, there are some arrows pointing to certain frequencies, and mentioning distances in feet. What are these measurements in feet?
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MrKnobs

                            However, when I installed the monitors in my small control room, the measured response I got (borrowing the B&K mike from work, sorry boss) and using JBL Smaart on my home computer showed a very different story. The figure below shows the SMAART analysis for one speaker recorded at the equilateral midpoint between monitors. Note the scale on the Y axis to see how truly horrible the room response is.


                            Terry, I am not sure how to read this chart. I was wondering if you could help me.

                            First of all, the line isn't supposed to be all sawtoothed like that, is it? Isn't it supposed to be a fairly straight line?

                            Also, on the left hand side, there are some arrows pointing to certain frequencies, and mentioning distances in feet. What are these measurements in feet?
                            <div class="signaturecontainer">Where did our love go?</div>

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                            • #15
                              Hmmm... I'm no expert, but I'd say that decent monitors in a bad room is still better than a hi-fi-stereo or headphones in the same bad room...
                              It will take some time to learn how things sound, but it'll work.

                              (Btw, since you're in Canada(?) I'd recommend you trying some Yorkville YSM1P's! Canadian monitors that are cheap and sound great! I think that they're recommended in the sticky-thread as well...)
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