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  • Akg C3000b

    I recently bought the Boss BR-1600 CD digital recording studio and the mic they recommend using with it is the AKG 3000B. Just wondering why they would pick this particular mic. Is it a good overall mic? I want it mainly for vocals.
    Thanks for any input in advance
    David

  • #2
    Who are "they" that recommended the mic? (just curious)

    I have used a C-3000 several times and have never liked it. It seemed very bright and harsh in the high end, at least to my ears. I think for the money, you would be better off looking at something else. There are quite a few other mics in the C-3000 price range and less that I think would be better.
    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;That's a matter of opinion. Like &quot;a supermodel is less attractive than a sore-infested, poo-covered morbidly obese bald chick&quot; is a matter of opinion.&quot; <br />
    - Audacity Works<br />
    <br />
    &quot;Ain't nobody ever walked down the street humming the sound of a microphone... it's all about 'the music'.&quot;<br />
    -Fletcher</div>

    Comment


    • #3
      "They" are the people at Roland. I appreciate your advice though.
      Anybody else??

      Comment


      • #4
        Rock Austin:

        Did you try the C3000 or the C3000b (supposedly an updated, better version) ?

        I have the C3000b and it has worked nicely for a low priced mic for vocals, acoustic guitar, and for an electric guitar/amp room mic.


        Gutter Pup

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gutter Pup
          Rock Austin:

          Did you try the C3000 or the C3000b (supposedly an updated, better version) ?

          I have the C3000b and it has worked nicely for a low priced mic for vocals, acoustic guitar, and for an electric guitar/amp room mic.


          Gutter Pup


          3000b... I thought I liked it at first, but as I started trying other mics, I never found a use for it anymore. I got better results on those sources with an AT4030, MD-421, Studio Projects B-1, and even an MXL (can't remember the number). And the 3000 doesn't even come close to my Baby Bottle or AT 4050... of course they are more expensive, but not really that much more (you can find them on E-Bay in the mid-$300 range usually). Definitely worth saving just a little bit more $$ for.

          I just think in that price range they are lots of excellent choices. Rather than going with what a rep recommends, I would see if you could audition a few different mics and pick the one YOU think sounds best.
          <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;That's a matter of opinion. Like &quot;a supermodel is less attractive than a sore-infested, poo-covered morbidly obese bald chick&quot; is a matter of opinion.&quot; <br />
          - Audacity Works<br />
          <br />
          &quot;Ain't nobody ever walked down the street humming the sound of a microphone... it's all about 'the music'.&quot;<br />
          -Fletcher</div>

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by twinwillows
            "They" are the people at Roland. I appreciate your advice though.
            Anybody else??


            I'm a big fan of AKG but not because of their budget stuff.. C1000/3000. I find them harsh and unadaptable generally. I lent a Rode NT2 to a friend the other day as an overhead for drums and he seems to think it sounds loads better than his 3000 at the same job...

            In MHO, there are better mics out there for general purpose LD duties..
            <div class="signaturecontainer">"(The New Testament) is a work of crude carpentry, hammered together long after its purported events, and full of improvised attempts to make things come out right." Christopher Hitchens, R.I.P</div>

            Comment


            • #7
              Great advice, thanks guys. Anybody else as I'm planning some sort of purchase this saturday.
              David

              Comment


              • #8
                Bump!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by twinwillows
                  Bump!


                  It's an average mic, seriously. I can't think why they recommend it over other mics..

                  How much do you have to spend and what do you want a mic for? That might be a better way to go at this....
                  <div class="signaturecontainer">"(The New Testament) is a work of crude carpentry, hammered together long after its purported events, and full of improvised attempts to make things come out right." Christopher Hitchens, R.I.P</div>

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rimmer
                    It's an average mic, seriously. I can't think why they recommend it over other mics.


                    Maybe they are completely in the dark about what has been going on with condenser mics in the last few years ???

                    Originally posted by Rimmer
                    How much do you have to spend and what do you want a mic for? That might be a better way to go at this....


                    That would definitely be a better way to go at this.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      After reading some of the other replies, I re-thought this, and have to point out that I have had the C3000b for quite a while - - before I learned of mic's such as the Studio Projects C1. I haven't tried the C-1, hence, it may very well be a superior mic.

                      Rather, when I got the C3000b, I had previously been using a number of low-end mic's, including the Oktava 219 (not 319), an AKG C1000s, a Shure SM 27, and the Rode NT. Of all these mics, I found the C3000b, for my ear and that of the folks I recorded with, worked better than the others in most situations for vocals, acoustic guitar, and servicing as an electric guitar/amp room mic for my home project studio. The SM 27 is not bad at all; however, for some reason, at least with my own set up through my analog mixer and outboard gear, the C3000b had a bit more fullness. I did not notice a high-end harshness. But again, I'm using a British EQ'ed mixer, which is warm, but not overall sharp on the high end. Perhaps this goes to show that, at least on the lower end of things, one man's mic used on his recording gear may not sound the same when used through another's gear, or for that fact, when used in conjunction with the other man's ears ????? Are you confused, I most certainly am . . . ?

                      Anyway, I may check out the C-1 fairly soon if I don't come up with some more $ for one of the higher end mics recommended by some of the experienced engineers here.

                      Gutter Pup

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If your Boss recorder offers "mic modelling" this is why they recommended it.It is one of the mics they recommend to recreate other high dollar mics w/ their modelling process.The sm57 is another one & it's considerably cheaper & what I use.Roland offers a dynamic mic as well.
                        You might try the Roland VS site & ask for recommendations if it's worth the $$.Personally being a Roland user I think the 57 does well enough...... as the modelling is okay,but it really is just a differant flavor more than accurate modelling IMO.
                        Good luck,Smitty

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gutter Pup
                          After reading some of the other replies, I re-thought this, and have to point out that I have had the C3000b for quite a while - - before I learned of mic's such as the Studio Projects C1. I haven't tried the C-1, hence, it may very well be a superior mic.


                          I was always at the risk of pissing some existing owners off. Not intentially. I don't doubt that a lot of owners of the 3000 are quite happy with their performance. It just seems strange for a company to big up a microphone which should generally be considered average at best. $

                          I will say though that the 3000 and the 1000 can work well in some situations (I heard a 1000 on a steel guitar sound really represent the sound of the instrument, or at least make it really bright and pleasant to listen to..), but it's hardly a quality all'rounder.. You can do better for the cash... How much ya got??


                          ps. Big fan of AKG generally...
                          <div class="signaturecontainer">"(The New Testament) is a work of crude carpentry, hammered together long after its purported events, and full of improvised attempts to make things come out right." Christopher Hitchens, R.I.P</div>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had a C3000b and sold it. It was recommended to me by a trusted source, but even though it was my first LDC I never really dug it that much on anything. It is not a particularly "forgiving" mic. The more you use it, the more you notice the "harshness" I guess - especially compared to other mics.

                            Since then I bought an SP B3, and a C1. For the price of the C3000B and a little more you can have both those mics, and more variety. Or just get the B3.

                            The B3 is one of my favorites for acoustic gtr and female vox. My buddy and I just stand on either side of it with it set for figure 8 and record our acoustic duo in mono. Its a very versatile and easy-to-use mic. Its a great choice if you only are gonna have 1 LDC mic.

                            It only has 1 pattern - cardioid. It gets less use than the B3 but its nice for male voice, like my baritone.

                            -JS

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                            • #15
                              Really appreciate the input guys. Thanks alot. And yes Smitty got it right. It was chosen since it is the only condenser mic that is currently supported as the "source" microphone for using the COSM microphone modeling technology found in the BR-1600CD. Roland got back to me with that. But as I was researching other mics in that price range and reading comments I found that I could indeed do alot better. I've looked at AT3035, AT4040, AT4047, AT4050, Baby Bottle, Dragon Fly, Rode NTK, Shure SM7 and Marshalls MXL 603 & V69. I want it mainly for vocals and acoustic gtr and these seem to have gotten higher praise. But the one that really stuck out was the C1. Also very reasonably priced.
                              Your comments gentlemen??

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