Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Live Tracking in studio.How does this work?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse







X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Live Tracking in studio.How does this work?

    I talked to a local recording studio and I said I was low on funds so I didnt wanna rack up alot of hrs on a demo or EP.I told them That we are just a 3pc band and they are runing a special on a 8hr block for a great price.I said can I get 9 songs done with mixdown with the whole band done in that time.He said if you have all of your songs down and you do live tracking then it will be close but it can be done.I ask what live tracking is.He said I would do my guitar tracks in Iso Room 1 and the drummer in iso room 2 and the bass player going direct into the board in the console room and we run thru all of the songs as kind of a live take and if nobody ****************s up those will be the main tracks.My guitar parts will be layerd to my specs since I will have 6 mics in my iso room with 1 cab and I play live and record stereo and layer a few drum tracks panned and the bass tracks front and center and then Ill spend a few hrs with the vocals.Is this the smart way to go with my CD.Its sounds great.I would think It would only take 8hrs to record 45mins worth of music.He said what takes the longset is wroking with 2 guitar player bands and micing and remicing each guitar player then moving the bass player into a seprate iso room and then the drummer after they are done with their tracks.Basicly a pain.What do you guys think about all this.

  • #2
    Originally posted by sickwindsor
    I talked to a local recording studio and I said I was low on funds so I didnt wanna rack up alot of hrs on a demo or EP.I told them That we are just a 3pc band and they are runing a special on a 8hr block for a great price.I said can I get 9 songs done with mixdown with the whole band done in that time.He said if you have all of your songs down and you do live tracking then it will be close but it can be done.I ask what live tracking is.He said I would do my guitar tracks in Iso Room 1 and the drummer in iso room 2 and the bass player going direct into the board in the console room and we run thru all of the songs as kind of a live take and if nobody ****************s up those will be the main tracks.My guitar parts will be layerd to my specs since I will have 6 mics in my iso room with 1 cab and I play live and record stereo and layer a few drum tracks panned and the bass tracks front and center and then Ill spend a few hrs with the vocals.Is this the smart way to go with my CD.Its sounds great.I would think It would only take 8hrs to record 45mins worth of music.He said what takes the longset is wroking with 2 guitar player bands and micing and remicing each guitar player then moving the bass player into a seprate iso room and then the drummer after they are done with their tracks.Basicly a pain.What do you guys think about all this.


    8 hours sounds like plenty of time to play 45 minutes worth of music and mix it all, but it really isn't that much time at all. Live tracking is a great way to record some bands, but ONLY if the songs are tight, well rehearsed, and already arranged. I did a recording like this about 3 weeks for a very good local band who has been playing the songs for several months now, so they are very well rehearsed. It took about 1 1/2 - 2 hours to set up all the mics, play some scratch tracks, and listen to make sure what we were getting. No song took more than 2 takes, and we got 9 tracks then did about 8 overdub tracks in 10 hours (after deducting lunch and beer breaks). This time did NOT include anything except real simple and quick mixing.

    If this time includes mixing and you mainly want to record a demo, I would focus on your best 3-4 songs and go in with the goal of getting those completely finished. Once those are done and mixed and you have spare time, you can worry about the rest. If you can sing and play at the same time well, you may even record a live vocal track... they can usually set you up in an ISO booth with headphones, and your amp in another room. This way you might save some time if you nail a vocal track and don't have to go back and redub it.
    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;That's a matter of opinion. Like &quot;a supermodel is less attractive than a sore-infested, poo-covered morbidly obese bald chick&quot; is a matter of opinion.&quot; <br />
    - Audacity Works<br />
    <br />
    &quot;Ain't nobody ever walked down the street humming the sound of a microphone... it's all about 'the music'.&quot;<br />
    -Fletcher</div>

    Comment


    • #3
      Well we wont be taking any lunch or beer breaks and the guy was cool and said hey wouldnt charge us extra time or setting up mics and mixdown he would only chare us for the time we start tracking till our last take.Its more like a demo EP.It is going to be the album im going to have a short run made like around 250-500 made and if the sales go good then I plan to go back and book atleast triple the time and to it right with an 11-12 song EP and do a long run pressing.This is just the short term but it will have a huge impact of where I go to from here so I want it to sounds the best it can with the smallest investment.

      Comment


      • #4
        The main problem is that after tracking, and before mixing, you need to take a break. You need to.

        Why? Because your ears need to readjust from one mode to another, and you're also fatigued at that point.

        I'm not saying you won't be able to do it, but its likely that the next day, or next week, you'll be wondering why your mix is so off.

        I wish you luck but it will be hard to get something you're really satisfied with in 1 day. I'd go for 2 minimum. Track on day 1, mix on day 2.

        -JS

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by joesixpack123
          The main problem is that after tracking, and before mixing, you need to take a break. You need to.

          Why? Because your ears need to readjust from one mode to another, and you're also fatigued at that point.

          I'm not saying you won't be able to do it, but its likely that the next day, or next week, you'll be wondering why your mix is so off.

          I wish you luck but it will be hard to get something you're really satisfied with in 1 day. I'd go for 2 minimum. Track on day 1, mix on day 2.

          -JS


          Listen to this man. It could be mixed by the engineer AND recorded in the same day...but who knows how good it will sound. I was even thinking about recommending that your band go in to do 1 - 3 songs first, and then come back for the rest? Why? So you'd be used to it the next time. The second would be more familiar, and everyone might be more relaxed. Just a thought though. It's not like the drummer would have to learn to play to a click track for a live recording. ..or would he? Hmm, depends.
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="3">Affordable Website Design - <a href="http://digisitedesigns.com/" target="_blank">DigiSiteDesigns.com</a> !</font></div>

          Comment


          • #6
            I have done too many sessions with bands that have no money, want to cram as much stuff into as little time as possible and they always have these great expectations, they think they can accomplish all of these things and have so much time. In reality, even with a great band, a nice studio and a good engineer, 1 day for tracking, overdubs and mixing is going to make things very hectic and rushed. Even if you get it all done, the quality will probably not be up to par in large part because of the stress of having to finish so quickly. Watching the clock can be one of the most detrimental elements to a bands performance. Thats why I always recommend you save the money, do it once and do it right.

            You might be able to get a 3-4 song demo in that short amount of time but I would seriously recommend you see if you can get a day rate, spend 3 days and you'll get something much better (and trust me things will still be rushed).

            The point about making the transistion from tracking to mixing is very valid. I will mix after tracking if I have to but I don't like to and don't recommend it. just my 2 cents

            Comment


            • #7
              It really depends on what you're looking to accomplish. If you just want a higher fidelity version of what the band sounds like live, there's a remote possibilty that you could get it done in that amount of time.

              The more probable outcome is that you'll be too rushed, you won't be comfortable in the studio, you'll wind up settling and you'll have wasted 8 hours on a demo that isn't good enough to do anything with.

              I've done stuff that fast, but it's not really fun for anyone, especially the engineer. When I estimate projects for potential clients, I usually tell them between 12-15 hours per SONG, if it's standard pop/rock stuff and you want results that are comparable with most indie releases. If it's punk rock, or something that doesn't require a lot of overdubbing/editing you can do it for less, but much less than 4-5 hrs./song is not going to give you a demo that you can really do anything with, other than give away to your friends.

              There are exceptions to every rule, but 99% of the time, my estimates come out right on the money.

              Here's my advice:

              Pick out the 3-4 best songs you have.

              Practice the crap out of them.

              Do NOT go out and get hammered the night before the session.

              Book a day to do basics: drums, bass, guitars. To do it right, it WILL take this long. You won't want to do more than 3-4 takes of the drum/bass tracks. After that, you'll lose the vibe, unless you're really veterans. You'll want to put your different guitar tones on separate tracks, double some parts, etc. This takes time, but will save time at mixdown and give you a much better product.

              You WILL want to take a few breaks, if you get tired and hungry, you'll sound tired and hungry.

              Book another 3-4 hour session to track vocals and edit the existing tracks.

              Book 2 more 3-4 hour sessions to mix. If you mix more than 2/per session, you'll be back to remix the last ones again, trust me.

              That'll put you at right around 20 hrs., which is aboutr the minimum. IMHO. You'll have mix pretty quickly, too. There won't be enough time to really finesse it.

              Look at it this way, this is the initial recorded effort by your band. If you have to make excuses for it, in any way, you've blown it.

              What do you think would be more impressive, to both fans and clubowners/labels - 9 songs that sound crappy, or 3-4 songs that sound like the stuff they hear on the radio? You only get one chance at a first impression...

              MG
              "Thank You, NASA!"

              Comment

              Working...
              X