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turning monitors off at power strip really o.k.?

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  • turning monitors off at power strip really o.k.?

    hiyas,

    i'm savin up for and looking around at monitors and i've noticed there aren't many with a power button on front. it's really not feasible in my studio set up, position wise, to reach around the back of the monitor/s everytime to turn them on and off everyday(and more than once a day).

    i've been told by sales folks it's o.k. to turn them off at the powerstrip that they are plugged into. and that when doing that, it's best to have the monitors plugged into their own seperate power strip.

    i know people do this and i'd imagine many do, cuz one, there ain't that many monitors with power buttons on front(why is that manufacturers?) and two, i can't imagine everyone's studio is set up to where they can reach around to the back of their monitors.

    well.........i'm wonderin if any folks out there with years of experience with their monitors could tell me what they do/have done and whether it really is o.k. to turn the monitors off at the powerstrip and if anyones had any problems from it and whether it'll mess up the monitors or not? and any tips/advice on doing it properly....

    and.......what about frequency of turning the monitors on and off(at the powerstrip), a number of times a day. if you're recording a couple times a day, with hours in between though, do you turn them on and off and it's o.k. or is keeping them on all day better?


    :wave:

  • #2
    You won't damage them, because a power button does the same thing as the switch on a power bar. One isn't "safer" then the other. They both cut the power flow. You're good to go!

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    • #3
      I have a set of Genelecs with a sub, and I have them all connected to a single power strip. I've been turning them on via the strip for years with no noticeable adverse effects.

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      • #4
        Also, the worst thing you can do to electronics is turn them on and off. At idle, your powered monitors use about 2 pennies of electricity a month. I'd recommend not turning them on and off daily, but leave them on. We leave everythng but VGA monitors on 24/7/365 here, and we have basically no maintainence to do, the gear continues to work great.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by where02190
          Also, the worst thing you can do to electronics is turn them on and off. At idle, your powered monitors use about 2 pennies of electricity a month. I'd recommend not turning them on and off daily, but leave them on. We leave everythng but VGA monitors on 24/7/365 here, and we have basically no maintainence to do, the gear continues to work great.


          I was just wondering what damage was done to equipment by turning it on and off.
          <div class="signaturecontainer">Orlando Magana<br />
          www.maganaaudioproductions.com</div>

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          • #6
            Originally posted by yoitsme


            I was just wondering what damage was done to equipment by turning it on and off.



            When you turn on electrical equipment, a quick jolt of electricity goes through the whole system. You can hear this when you first turn on a tube amp or something. This stresses the electrical components, i.e. the caps, resisters, icu's, etc...which can lead to costly maintenance.

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            • #7
              I understand the theory, but personally, I turn everything off.

              I'm more afraid of the accidental damage I would do by forgetting to do various other things necessary to remember if you leave stuff on.

              Like plugging or unplugging a mic into a preamp while the phantom power is on.

              Or forgetting to turn all the volumes on everything all the way off after each use so you don't get big thumps in your speakers when stuff is patched in next time you use it.

              No big deal for you young folks with alert minds, but when you start to get old and forgetful, it's not a bad idea to learn to protect yourself from yourself.

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              • #8
                I leave my monitors on pretty much 24/7, but when I do turn them off, it's via powerstrip because it's a pain to get to the back of the monitors.
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                • #9
                  If you're gonna leave stuff on, make sure you use protection.

                  That is, power conditions, UPS, etc. This may be a no-brainer, but it helps to be reminded.
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                  • #10
                    Good point - and another reason to turn stuff off:

                    If you live in an area where lightning storms occur with any regularity (like Florida, e.g.) definitely turn your **************** off. Probably a good idea to even unplug stuff from outlets if possible.

                    Even the high priced surge protectors are pretty useless against a direct hit, and good luck trying to colect on the million dollar "insurance" they claim to provide - they always write them in legalese that gives them an out.

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                    • #11
                      The spike you get when turning stuff on is tough on electronic parts so avoiding that can be a good thing.

                      Gear running creates heat which is also bad for electronics so operating 24/7 if your equipment isn't properly cooled can be used somewhat against the startup jolt arguement.

                      When in a working studio it is usually best to leave things on all the time while in a home studio that isn't in constant use some sensible compromise is probably a good idea. An example of this would be to turn stuff off if you are not coming back to it that day but maybe leaving it running if you are only going to be away from it for a few or even several hours.

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                      • #12
                        thanx for the replies. i appreciate it.

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                        • #13
                          Sutting off gear won't prevent it from damage if you get hit by lightning, as it's still connected to the power source and to ground. If you live in an area of frequent close lightning, disconnect your equipment from the power source during such events.

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                          • #14
                            Good point about the ground. Often the electrical ground is tied to Neutral, and isn't totally at earth potential. That means if lightening hits the powerlines, the energy will travel through anything it can - including the ground.

                            I don't like to leave anything with a transformer unattended. They can catch fire. Also - it's worth noting that many appliances that have power switches only turn off the low voltage side of a transformer - and the transformer remains power up and chewing up electricity.

                            Somebody told me you could save lots of electricity by turning microwave ovens off at the wall. I didn't believe them at first - but then I realised, they have transformers. And those are big transformers, to supply some serious power when actually cooking. But most of the time, they just sit their running a little digital clock. But - because the use the same grunty transformer to run this little clock, the energy wasted is much higher than a basic digital clock that has a tiny little transformer.

                            I hate power transformers - I think the modern switching PSU's are safer and more efficient.

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                            • #15
                              I'm curious about this "startup jolt" thing: is this a jolt of current or voltage?

                              Where does this come from? I'm just an amature sparky, but it isn't something that I have heard of or understand.

                              I do know that an electric motor, when starting, will pull a lot of current as it starts to turn and then pull less ass the motor starts to move.

                              I know that, as the filiment of a lightbulb heats up its resistance goes from nothing (cold, drawing a lot of current) to whatever it is supposed to be at (when it gets hot, the resistance goes up and the current draw goes down); that explains why they often fail at startup.

                              I also know that when you run the heaters on tubes at too low a current (as is the case when a tube rectifier has not yet heated up) the cathode will shed material. Of course, I am little foggy on this, as I don't use too much tube equipment.

                              Other than those, I can't think of any kinds of startup issues...

                              So could someone explain the mechanism behind this "startup jolt" in solid-state consumer electronics?
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