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How does the AKG C414 sound for male vocals?

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  • How does the AKG C414 sound for male vocals?

    How does the AKG C414 sound for male vocals? Better choice than the KSM 44?

    lets say you had to buy blindly.

  • #2
    There are multiple variations of the 414, so it matters which one you mean. The XLII is designed for solo voice and instrument, and I assume that's the one you'd want. I hav that guy, though I don't own others so I can't provide comparitive evaluations. But it's a good mic and has many other uses than just vocals because of the 5 different patterns and the fact that it's not very colored at all (just a lift in the highs for the XLII variation.)
    Dean Roddey
    Chairman/CTO, Charmed Quark Systems, LTD

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    • #3
      yes, the AKG C 414 B-XL II
      http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/AKG-C-414-BXL-II-Condenser-Microphone-?sku=278591

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      • #4
        On male vocals the c414 is hit or miss, it either sounds really nice or really bad.

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        • #5
          If a mic is basically flat, and the 414 is other than a little rise in the top end for air, and potentially some proximity effect on the bottom if you sing up close, then you are hearing what went in. So the problem would seem to have to be in the voice itself. So I think it's probably more fair to say that some other, less flat, mic might hide those flaws better, not that the C414 (or any flat mic) sounds bad per se.
          Dean Roddey
          Chairman/CTO, Charmed Quark Systems, LTD

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          • #6
            The XLII is designed for solo voice and instrument, and I assume that's the one you'd want



            Pure marketing BS there, all LDC's are designed for "solo voice and instrument" not just that one particular model of C414.

            ..and they don't exactly stop working because you have two or more people singing into one of them

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            • #7
              The XLII has a non-flat top end response, designed to flatter solo voice or instrument, as apposed to a completely flat response that might be more appropriate for other uses. You may consdider that marketing BS, but they aren't saying that's all it can be used for. They are saying they made it the way it is (non-flat) because they *intended* it for a particular use, being to flatter solo vocals and instruments. They aren't telling you you can't use it for anything else. But clearly the non-flat response vs. flat response of some of the other variants is an important consideration for some people, so it's not like they shouldn't make it obvious what their intentions are for the particular models.
              Dean Roddey
              Chairman/CTO, Charmed Quark Systems, LTD

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              • #8
                so what should I do guys? I have to buy blind and I need to decide on a mic for male vocals.

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                • #9
                  The XLII has a non-flat top end response, designed to flatter solo voice or instrument, as apposed to a completely flat response that might be more appropriate for other uses. You may consdider that marketing BS, but they aren't saying that's all it can be used for..



                  What I am saying is that LDC's in general don't have a flat frequency response and all the versions of 414 get used on solo voices and instruments.

                  The different models of 414 simply have kind of different non-flat responses.

                  Depending on the vocalist, the room, the mic placement, and all the other gear involved one version of 414 might sound better to you than another.

                  If the 414 XLII is as they say "designed to flatter a solo voice or instrument then what are the other versions of 414 meant for??? Non-solo voice or instrument??? AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! All the different 414"s over the years have been used primarily for solo voice and instrument.

                  Non-solo I guess would mean a bunch of vocalists or a bunch of instruments with either a choral group or an orchestra I think most people would reach for a pair of small diaphragm mics rather than a 414.

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                  • #10
                    so what should I do guys? I have to buy blind and I need to decide on a mic for male vocals.


                    If you can't audition a mic for yourself you are basically buying blind (deaf would be more accurate here I guess)... unfortunately that's how it works.

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                    • #11
                      Here is are the responses for the XLS:

                      http://www.akg.com/site/products/powerslave,id,781,pid,781,nodeid,2,_language,EN,vi ew,diagram.html

                      Here are the responses for the XLII:

                      http://www.akg.com/site/products/powerslave,id,782,pid,782,nodeid,2,_language,EN,vi ew,diagram.html


                      They are considerably different, very much so in some of the polar patterns, with the XLII having a substantial rise in that upper-mids area. The intent being to give more 'air' to solo instruments and whatnot. The XLS doesn't have that kind of rise and is considerably flatter. The XLS in Omni mode is pretty flat until you get up pretty high.

                      Anyway, make of it what you will, but clearly there are significant differences in the response between the two models. Their *intention* is that the XLII's rise would be good for solo instrument or voice, but obviously anyone can use them however they want.


                      Non-solo I guess would mean a bunch of vocalists or a bunch of instruments with either a choral group or an orchestra I think most people would reach for a pair of small diaphragm mics rather than a 414.


                      I see them pretty often used as drum overheads, where I guess you wouldn't necessarily want any added top end (because they are picking up a lot of cymbals.)
                      Dean Roddey
                      Chairman/CTO, Charmed Quark Systems, LTD

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                      • #12
                        Since your buying blind, you may want to go with a Studio Projects C1. It is less then half of the cost of a c414 and works very nicely on male vocals

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                        • #13
                          I have two of the TLII's and I've been pretty happy with them. They are definately a workhorse mic.

                          However, I would highly recommend not paying 999 for a new one.

                          I scored two sealed in box for 625 a piece off of ebay!!

                          I don't think you'd be disappointed. I'm sure the studio projects is a good mic for the money, but as far as an investment and name recognition (if those are at all important to you) the AKG is the better choice.

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