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Recording vocals, how to avoid headphone bleed?

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  • Recording vocals, how to avoid headphone bleed?

    Alright, so I am new to recording. I'd like to know how i can avoid headphone bleed? that being said I plan on picking up some quality headphones this weekend (feel free to make recommendations!) which i think will be a good contributing factor... Any help appreciated!

    Using:
    Pro Tools LE 8
    Mbox 2
    Shure Sm57
    Crappy radioshack headphones.

    Thanks,

    Nick
    Guitar rig:
    Gibson Les Paul Standard
    Orange Thunderverb 50 + Orange PPC212

  • #2
    It's pretty simple, really:

    1) Buy drummer headphones. Fidelity ain't great, but they don't bleed as much

    2) Turn headphones down

    3) Only have real tracks, no scratch or click in phones when you track. Then if you bleed a bit, it won't be noticeable.
    Todzilla
    HUGE sound generation & capture facility
    Eno River Basin

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    • #3
      It's pretty simple, really:

      1) Buy drummer headphones. Fidelity ain't great, but they don't bleed as much

      2) Turn headphones down

      3) Only have real tracks, no scratch or click in phones when you track. Then if you bleed a bit, it won't be noticeable.


      Thanks for the advice man!! ill make sure to remember that from now on .

      now to figure out if my damn mbox latency issues are fixable.
      Guitar rig:
      Gibson Les Paul Standard
      Orange Thunderverb 50 + Orange PPC212

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      • #4
        Or use high quality IEM earbuds.

        Terry D.
        Telling Stories releases 2nd CD, see our WEBSITE! Please check out my GROUPIE STORY and Tales from the Road.

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        • #5
          I've never had any problems with bleed using decent closed headphones. My Extreme Isolation EX-29s have probably got the most use for things where I need isolation, but I haven't had any problems with my Sennheiser HD-280 Pros either (other than the fact that I don't like the sound).
          Originally Posted by Norton666 (15/07/2009)


          Give it 6 months and the Axe-Fx will be mentioned in the same sentence as the Johnson Millenium stuff.

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          • #6
            Yea my guess is he's using over the ear or open backed headphones. So long as the headphones are over the ear closed back type, there shouldnt be any bleed, and if there was, you'd never hear it over the tracking. If you do have closed backed and there that much bleedover, you are either too close to the mic or pumping too much background music.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the advice man!! ill make sure to remember that from now on .

              now to figure out if my damn mbox latency issues are fixable.



              ProTools won't run in 'zero latency mode' when you're using an MBox.

              What you have to do is set your 'mix' control to about halfway (you can tweak this for a better level after) on the MBox and mute the channel that you're recording on in ProTools. That way, you're hearing the track you're recording in realtime with the tracks you're playing back.
              Unfortunately, this is the only way to track using an MBox and you won't be able to monitor any 'in the box' processing for the track you're recording.

              Hope this helps,
              ad
              flip the phase

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              • #8
                Would reversing the phase of one side of the headphones and making the monitor mix mono help cancel out the bleed at the mic?
                Null.

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                • #9
                  Cool theory. I dunno.
                  Class A douchebag.

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                  • #10
                    Would reversing the phase of one side of the headphones and making the monitor mix mono help cancel out the bleed at the mic?


                    Unlikely. Phasing will only affect direct focused sound not sound bleeding from an angle. You would also need to dissasemble the elements in the cup to reverse phase at the speaker which can wipe out many haedphones with the way they're made, then you would need to do it again to get it back. Headphones use a common ground so switching phase back and forth is impractable.

                    Besides with the right headphones at the right level there is no bleed. If you adjust the headphone level equal to your own natureal voice with closed back theres no way you're going to bleed over. I suspect he may have opened back hifi bones and is too close to the mic as well. You can eat a mic like that on stage. Recording you're normally 6~12 inches from the mic. I use an old set of JVC bones. I do crank them and never have bleedover with even the most sensitive condencers. I can hear everything else in the room, even rubbing my shirt, sounds like someone raking leaves.

                    You can always use envelopes or a gate between vocal parts to create silence. I do this with my drummers voice when we're doing live recordings. His mic picks up alot of drum cymbals. I can also vary the phase to help null the bleedover, but even with it there, his voive is going to be many DB's above the background bleedover so getting his voice to come through is rarely an issue.

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                    • #11
                      I don't do vocal tracking very often, but I have many headphones (most hi fi), so let me chime in a little bit.

                      I think the use of closed cans (and the submix feed to the vocalist) is the key to reduce bleed over. Some closed cans, however, tends to bleed like open cans because of the ear pad design. For example, Beyerdynamic DT770 is "closed" can, but the ear pad is cloth. So, it is comfortable to wear long hours, but isolation is not so good. I call it "semi" closed.

                      The cans which uses vinyl ear pads with tight pressure, and larger ear cups are better in isolation. Ultrasone hfi series (580/680/780) and Sennheiser HD280Pro are good examples. Another can which has excellent isolation is Denon D2000 and D5000. I think the reason why HD280 is so popular in mixing studio is because the isolation is very good. To me, HD280 is kind of too tight and fatiguing, so I rarely use it. Instead, my favorite is Denon D5000.
                      Gears: I don't know why I have so many gears that I don't need

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