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  • Hi/Low Pass with curve?

    Anyone know of a free hi/low pass VST that shows the curve it is cutting along? I can find plenty of versions which knobs and dials, but none that show it graphically.
    Don't listen to Justin.
    LCK - 2/21/2012

  • #2
    Every DAW that I've ever heard of includes this functionality for free. You just go into the stock EQ plug-in (which 90% of the time has the type of display you are asking about) and change the filter type on the lower and upper bands to high pass filter and low pass filter.



    But in case you're on Audacity or something, there are plenty of free ones, too. Like this: http://www.kvraudio.com/product/bx_c...p_by_brainworx



    Brainworx makes great products. I don't think the filters on this one are very steep, but the important part is not how it looks on the graph, but how it sounds. There are dozens if not hundreds of additional options at KVR.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just look for a paragraphic EQ that has maybe 5 bands.

      most have a line with dots and you just pull them down

      to get what you need. theres usually a button that will let you

      select between high and lo pass and you can just set the

      roll off frequencies.



      If you dont find what you like at KVR aster trying the Free Bees,

      Voxengo makes some great low cost plugs. They have several different

      EQ plugins, and several with additional functions. If for example, you're using

      EQ and a comp on an instrument, you can find ones that have one plugin that does both.



      I'd think Audacity would have an EQ that does the job. i only tested that program out

      once so I dont remember any particulars. If worse comes to worse, download reaper and use that

      as a DAW. you can run it free and I'm sure it must have an EQ there you can use.

      Comment


      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by Zooey
        View Post

        Every DAW that I've ever heard of includes this functionality for free. You just go into the stock EQ plug-in (which 90% of the time has the type of display you are asking about) and change the filter type on the lower and upper bands to high pass filter and low pass filter.



        But in case you're on Audacity or something, there are plenty of free ones, too. Like this: http://www.kvraudio.com/product/bx_c...p_by_brainworx



        Brainworx makes great products. I don't think the filters on this one are very steep, but the important part is not how it looks on the graph, but how it sounds. There are dozens if not hundreds of additional options at KVR.




        Yeah, I have one, but it isn't visual enough for me. I've been manually doing it through EQ manipulations, but your link looks promising.



        Thanks for the response, guys!
        Don't listen to Justin.
        LCK - 2/21/2012

        Comment


        • #5
          Mix with your ears, not your eyes.



          -Dan.
          Well, I've been to one world fair, a picnic, and a rodeo, and that's the stupidest thing I ever heard come over a set of earphones.

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by IsildursBane
            View Post

            Mix with your ears, not your eyes.



            -Dan.




            Yep.



            Comparing contours vs frequency analysers and whatnot will only get you so far. You can carve out all the 'space' you want between instruments, but it won't necessarily make your mix gel.



            To do that, you do need to use your ears



            Do check the graphic representation if you hear comb filtering/phasey resonances being introduced. Most non-linear-phase EQ's will introduce this type of artifact when you have 2 elements of a multiband EQ sitting too close together, frequency wise. Sometimes narowing the Q of one of the elements will get rid of it, but most times you'll need to take a different approach to the EQ to prevent it.
            flip the phase

            Comment


            • #7
              Added to that is the monitors you use.

              I did some songs recently with headphones only.

              I thought I had gotten it close mixing then pulled the songs over to the studio.

              The frequency balance and gain staging was all screwed up. What sounded proper

              using the bones like the guitars was clashing badly in the middle frequencies, bass wasnt sitting in the right place,

              vocals were muted, just a mess overall.



              The other item is targeting the right frequencies when you track so you dont have to EQ.

              It should be your first and foremost target to get right. It does take time. When it comes to mixing,

              you should make notes of that you're doing when you EQ to get a balanced sound. If you're having to roll

              off bass on guitars, roll the bass off tracking and it eliminates the need to high pass mixing. If the bass

              lacks mids of highs tracking boost those in the analog world tracking before its digitized and you wont

              have the losses associated with EQing in the box.



              A little tweak here and there before each new song you record and eventually its just plug and play.

              Tweaks will then just be a matter of choosing the best tones based on the musical arrangement and

              the composition you're playing and not RX in nature to fix something poorly recorded. Pre planning and having

              a good vision of what you want in the end does not begin when you mix, it begins before you even track.



              We all know its a matter of having the right gear though and learning to use it optimally.

              I'd be embarrased to mention some of the stuff i've used in the past. Main thing is I learned

              how to use what I had and got the most from it.



              If you havent got accurate monitors for mixing, then you may need a visual aid to make EQ

              decisions that are beyond what your system produces. There nothing wrong with downloading

              a free Frequency Analizer like Voxengo Span http://www.voxengo.com/product/span/



              Place it in your mains bus or on a track and keep the window open as you use an EQ.

              You'll find it much more effective than just using an EQ because you'll not only see what

              you have to work with frequency wise, you'll also see the impact of the EQ adjustments

              on the instruments waveform itself.

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by IsildursBane
                View Post

                Mix with your ears, not your eyes.



                -Dan.




                Yes, sensei.
                Don't listen to Justin.
                LCK - 2/21/2012

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by WRGKMC
                  View Post

                  Added to that is the monitors you use.

                  I did some songs recently with headphones only.

                  I thought I had gotten it close mixing then pulled the songs over to the studio.

                  The frequency balance and gain staging was all screwed up. What sounded proper

                  using the bones like the guitars was clashing badly in the middle frequencies, bass wasnt sitting in the right place,

                  vocals were muted, just a mess overall.



                  The other item is targeting the right frequencies when you track so you dont have to EQ.

                  It should be your first and foremost target to get right. It does take time. When it comes to mixing,

                  you should make notes of that you're doing when you EQ to get a balanced sound. If you're having to roll

                  off bass on guitars, roll the bass off tracking and it eliminates the need to high pass mixing. If the bass

                  lacks mids of highs tracking boost those in the analog world tracking before its digitized and you wont

                  have the losses associated with EQing in the box.



                  A little tweak here and there before each new song you record and eventually its just plug and play.

                  Tweaks will then just be a matter of choosing the best tones based on the musical arrangement and

                  the composition you're playing and not RX in nature to fix something poorly recorded. Pre planning and having

                  a good vision of what you want in the end does not begin when you mix, it begins before you even track.



                  We all know its a matter of having the right gear though and learning to use it optimally.

                  I'd be embarrased to mention some of the stuff i've used in the past. Main thing is I learned

                  how to use what I had and got the most from it.



                  If you havent got accurate monitors for mixing, then you may need a visual aid to make EQ

                  decisions that are beyond what your system produces. There nothing wrong with downloading

                  a free Frequency Analizer like Voxengo Span http://www.voxengo.com/product/span/



                  Place it in your mains bus or on a track and keep the window open as you use an EQ.

                  You'll find it much more effective than just using an EQ because you'll not only see what

                  you have to work with frequency wise, you'll also see the impact of the EQ adjustments

                  on the instruments waveform itself.




                  This is all great advice. Unfortunately, I am limited to recording in a basement that is not designed in any way for capturing sound, with one condensor mic at my disposal. Nor do I have true monitors, either, so I have to make due by listening in as many avenues as possible. A typical mix has to pass two sets of computer speaks, two sets of headphones, laptop speakers and a car stereo before I am comfortable walking away from it.



                  I'll definitely keep this in mind if/when I develop my arsenal, though.
                  Don't listen to Justin.
                  LCK - 2/21/2012

                  Comment


                  • #10






                    Quote Originally Posted by gubu
                    View Post

                    Yep.



                    Comparing contours vs frequency analysers and whatnot will only get you so far. You can carve out all the 'space' you want between instruments, but it won't necessarily make your mix gel.



                    To do that, you do need to use your ears



                    Do check the graphic representation if you hear comb filtering/phasey resonances being introduced. Most non-linear-phase EQ's will introduce this type of artifact when you have 2 elements of a multiband EQ sitting too close together, frequency wise. Sometimes narowing the Q of one of the elements will get rid of it, but most times you'll need to take a different approach to the EQ to prevent it.






                    Don't tell the yougster too much nonsense.



                    We pros all mix with the loudspeaker off, and some frequency color coding software, and when we see all colors, then the mix is finished

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      damn, that fretless is not dark purple enough...

                      Comment


                      • #12






                        Quote Originally Posted by Zedong Mao
                        View Post

                        Don't tell the yougster too much nonsense.



                        We pros all mix with the loudspeaker off, and some frequency color coding software, and when we see all colors, then the mix is finished




                        Dammit! I knew I was going wrong somewhere
                        flip the phase

                        Comment


                        • #13






                          Quote Originally Posted by gubu
                          View Post

                          Dammit! I knew I was going wrong somewhere




                          no, not really



                          but also mix in gray shade mode, then you get those real sad and depressing overall sound

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by Zedong Mao
                            View Post

                            no, not really



                            but also mix in gray shade mode, then you get those real sad and depressing overall sound




                            Do you need to use sunglasses when the mix is really loud?
                            flip the phase

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ReaEQ, one of the free plugs from Reaper



                              Available HERE useable in any vst-capable sequencer.
                              Tim O'Brien

                              Comment













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