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  • Questions about recording guitars

    I made the jump from Garageband to Logic Pro 9. Right now I'm working through the Apple Pro Trainng series book and I'm learning a lot. I'm probably learning more than I need because I really jsut want to record guitar, bass, drums and vocals for failrly straight ahead rock songs. But its definitely cool to learn about midi and samples and Flex Time etc.



    Anyway, when I write songs for my band I lay down the guitar tracks first. When you guys record guitars, do you have the guitar player play through the entire song non stop? I have found better luck in recording the the verse, chorus, intro, solo rhythm, etc. and then copying and pasting them together all in the same region.. Is that an acceptable technique?



    Does anyone else build songs like this?



    Thanks,



    Mike

  • #2
    Many people build the drums and bass first, then add the rest later. If you're going to do midi, then record the drums using a click track to get a consistent beat, or you will pull your hair out with timing issues, unless Logic 9 can cope with the timing issues...i'm not familiar with that software. I don't record the whole guitar track at once usually. Learn to record takes or lanes in sections so you can pick the best one, and even copy that section to another like you said above. I may do 4 to six takes for each section. You may want to use different takes as a variation in different sections so it doesn't sound too repetitive or 'loopy'.
    Maarkr HW: Privia Pro PX-5S, Casio XW-P1, Juno-G, Lucina... Epiphone Les Paul, Schecter Hellraiser C-1, Peavey Valve King 112, Mesa Boogie 2x12, Ovation Celebrity, Ibanez Gio Bass... Alesis D5 EDrums, Yamaha HS-80s w sub, Saffire Pro 24 thru Mackie Big Knob; Live: Behringer B315D, Peavey PV118D, Roland KC550, Zoom R-16...etc. SW: Reason 6, Sonar X3, Reaper, Acid Pro, IKMultimedia , UAD1...

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    • #3






      Quote Originally Posted by maarkr
      View Post

      Many people build the drums and bass first, then add the rest later. If you're going to do midi, then record the drums using a click track to get a consistent beat, or you will pull your hair out with timing issues, unless Logic 9 can cope with the timing issues...i'm not familiar with that software. I don't record the whole guitar track at once usually. Learn to record takes or lanes in sections so you can pick the best one, and even copy that section to another like you said above. I may do 4 to six takes for each section. You may want to use different takes as a variation in different sections so it doesn't sound too repetitive or 'loopy'.




      Good call. I should do takes and then copy and paste takes. I learned how to do crossfades but to be honest I can't really hear any disruptions during the transitions and I'm sure once the bass and drums are added in it will be virtually indistinguishable.



      As far as timing I record to a click but I might just try it with a simple drum loop all the way through just for timing instead of the click. I think I'd hear it better and play bettter to it.

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      • #4
        I agree about doing the drums and bass first, or even a click track track. They are like the foundation and frame of the house, and the rest is the finish work.

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        • #5
          Everything I write is either on guitar or piano.Then I'll record it with a click track.Then I'll record the drums and bass with the guitar in my phones but not in the mix.When I get the drum/bass recorded,9 times outta 10 I'll put rythm,bass,lead on the master and lose the original track.My MB Pro died and I went back to analog just for the hell of it.It made me realize how lazy and sloppy I'd gotten.It's pretty unforgiving.No more I'll clean it up later.I'm loving it.It's made me rehearse,get it right.

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          • #6
            sorry,did'nt mean to double post.could'nt delete

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            • #7
              Since my primary instrument is keyboards, I'll usually have drum machine play a simple beat and record a piano part to that. I'll then add bass and drums. After that I frequently go back and re-record the piano part using the bass and drum tracks and remove the drum machine. Finally add guitar, any additional keyboard tracks and vocals.
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              • #8
                Recording straight thru is limited to the guitarists abilities. Good live players dont always make good studio players and visa-versa.

                If you are going to the trouble of playing live parts, consider playing thru as opposed to copy & paste, it mixes things up and makes the track more credible ( if you are going for that type of performance) There are no set rules. However, its a little odd recording the gtr parts 1st, unless they play to a click track.

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                • #9
                  Music is just as much about having good emotion in the music as having good technical skill.

                  Punching in part by part sounds to me like there

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