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  • New to recording? In need of advice!

    Basically, here's my question, I want to be able to record, perfectly whatever I'm playing, so I'd record leads, be able to record rhythm, and edit them, and put them on top of one another and even stack vocals, basically I need to be able to record many different things and mesh them together.

    What would I need to be able to do this, would I NEED a computer? I've got one, but without internet, so hopefully there're things I can get without a computer lol.

    If you know of any machines, or anything that can do what I need, the cheaper, the better! Definitely don't care how great it is, so long as I can edit my songs lol.


  • #2

    Music Is All wrote:
    Basically, here's my question, I want to be able to record, perfectly whatever I'm playing... the cheaper, the better! Definitely don't care how great it is, so long as I can edit my songs lol.

     


    What?

    <div class="signaturecontainer"><a target="_blank" href="http://www.tauntr.com/">Tauntr.com - Adding Insult to Everything!</a><br><br><br><br>Neck Pocket Cavern Surveyor for the <font color="Red">Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You</font> club!<br><br><br><br>&quot;In all fairness, Les Pauls have a switch position labeled &quot;Rhythm&quot;, while Strats do not, because they are lead guitars for lead guitarists.&quot; -Flatspotter</div>

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    • #3

      Music Is All wrote:
      I want to be able to record, perfectly whatever I'm playing...

      ...  the cheaper, the better!


       

      well, hahaha, great, love your ideas...

       

      that kind of evertything perfect costs you about $500.000 to $65.000.00 USD in material, the later sum is what the studio did cost where I recorde, and still there is alway something wich is not perfect and the listening world has to live with that

      of couse i could work on the one and same production for all my life and perfect it every day, and maybe the day before I die it will be 99.99% perfect, but I am sure it would sound total boring.

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      • blue2blue
        blue2blue commented
        Editing a comment

        You can probably even get the cost lower for a dedicated recorder. You'll find that some very inexpensive small and handheld recorders have some simple overdubbing capabilities and you can dump the audio data into an adequate computer and edit there. (Moving things around isn't ideal but it's doable.) These start in the low hundreds of dolars (in the US); I've seen some under $200. But there are a lot of handhelds, some of them quite expensive, that don't do overdubs, so you have to be careful. 


        Moving up from there are 'table top recorders' -- basically the modern, digital version of the old cassette multi-trackers that originally fueled the home recording boom. Some have waveform display screens or can be attached to computer monitors for easier control and editing. (And, of course, you can usually dump to a computer for more sophisticated edting.) Comanies like Zoom, Roland, Tascam, and a few others dominate that scene.


        And, finally, there is the computer option.


        The computer option can offer the greatest flexibility -- but with flexibility can come complexity. It sounds like you're pretty much just getting your feet under you on the recording/gear front. While the effort would likely be 'good' for you (learning is always good and computers do dominate contemporary music production, the back-to-tape movement notwithstanding -- even when projects are tracked to tape, they are frequently overdubbed and edited on the computer for convenience sake) it would also involve a considerable learning curve. And, if your computer is older or not very powerful, you might find yourself tempted to start on an upgrade path there that could add to your costs.


        If you stick with and get serious about recording, you will likely gravitate to working on the computer (or maybe you'll go 'retro' to tape, who really knows?) but for now, a dedicated unit like table top or even handheld might be the quickest way to get rolling. 

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