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  • Taylor 514CE Specs

    Hello all... my first post.

    I have a Taylor 514CE made in 2001. I need the specs on this model year. Anyone know where I can find them. I'm thinking about selling. Thanks.

  • #2
    Taylor has great owner support - have you tried calling them directly? You might also ask here, this used to be the Taylor Forum until old Bob pulled the name (mostly T-folks hanging here)

    http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/index.php

    One thing you might also consider is having anything that it needs done under warranty - particularly upgrading the ES if it hasn't been done. The new owner would have to do it out of pocket and it is one of the things people are really nervous about.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Moozikchk
      Hello all... my first post.

      I have a Taylor 514CE made in 2001. I need the specs on this model year. Anyone know where I can find them. I'm thinking about selling. Thanks.


      Great guitar. I recorded my whole 2nd cd with that guitar. I can tell you the nut is 1 3/4 and the bridge spacing is 2 and 2/8th. I think you can look up the rest on Taylor's site. The best Taylor IMHO. Congrats
      Eric Skye
      My brand spanking new website

      Comment


      • #4
        A 2001 514ce is a African mahogany back and sides and western red cedar topped grand auditorium, equipped with a Fishman Prefix Pro Blend Pickup and cutaway with scalloped bracing. Pretty much exact copy of current 514ce, just with different tuning machines (Yours has the older grovers, the new ones are made by Taylor). Other than the electronics and tuners, everything should be pretty much the same.

        And Freeman, if it's a 2001, the ES didn't come around until early 2003, so no worries there. The pickup should work perfectly.

        And as for "the best Taylor", I don't know about that. This box isn't nearly as versatile as alot of other wood combos... Albeit a very sweet tone that is all its own...
        - Zach

        FOR SALE!

        2005 Eric Clapton American Strat - Great condition for a good price! PM or email me!

        Gear (Before next buying spree):

        Taylor 814ce - 2005
        Terada Dreadnaught FW-47 - 1950's
        Fender American Strat w/ Kinman pups
        Boss GT-8 Multi-Effects Processor
        Fender Blues Junior Tube Amp
        Sensaphonics ProPhonics 2X-S IEM's

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        • #5
          Thanks a bunch. I pretty much knew most of the info, just wanted to make sure before I put it up for sale (if I do).

          I've had two Taylor's in my time. This one and a 414ce. Right now I'm looking at a Taylor GS. Really like the sound of the cedar/mahogany and the spruce/rosewood.

          I've owned a couple of 000 Martin's; one high end and one less expensive model. Actually, the less expensive one played and sounded better. Sold both. Had a Takamine once - not too fond of it.

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          • #6
            zb0430

            what do you think is a versatile combo ? Cause I was actually thinking bout getting that exact one (cedar/mahagony)

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            • #7
              Well... I was actually looking for a rosewood/spruce guitar, however, I first played the cedar/mahogany and fell in love with the feel, tone and looks. I think the cedar brings warmth to the mahogany. Just enough to curtail the sound being too bright. It's a very balanced tone. And, the unique size of the guitar allows the sound to really project. When it comes down to it... I'll probably get the cedar/mahogany.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kuharido22
                zb0430

                what do you think is a versatile combo ? Cause I was actually thinking bout getting that exact one (cedar/mahagony)


                Well, everybody has their own personal preferences. And the Taylor 514ce is a great one for fingerpicking and light strumming. But, it's generally held that cedar topped guitars lack a bit when strummed in a medium-hard manner. The cedar gets overdriven in that seting. If you're a fingerpicker and light strummer, this guitar may very well be one of your best choices. It sounds great in that setting.

                But if you're asking my personal preferences, I'd wager that the 414ce, and even the 614ce if you like the sound of maple, will ultimately be more versatile guitars, able to handle fingerpicking very well, yet able to handle more complex strumming without getting muddy. That's the thing with cedar, it brings out BEAUTIFUL fingerpicked and flatpicked nuances, yet it isn't as condusive to strumming an open chord, unless you have a soft right hand attack, as other top materials, mainly spruce. And I could spark a debate with this, but you asked my opinion so I'll give it. To me, a rosewood back and sides is more versatile to me. Mahogany serves a great purpose for a woody tone lacking any complexity (good for recording) but nothing sounds as full and brilliant as rosewood, to my ear anyway. Now, to certain styles of music, the overtones are not so welcomed, but to ringing open chords and flatpicking, I enjoy the sound a bit better.

                For reference, the taylor line goes as follows with wood combos:

                414ce - Spruce and Ovangkol
                514ce - Cedar and Mahogany
                614ce - Spruce and Maple
                714ce - Cedar and Rosewood
                814ce - Spruce and Rosewood

                Remember, your ear is the ultimate authority, don;t take my word for it. Go listen for yourself, if you can. And if not, musiciansfriend.com has a great return policy.
                - Zach

                FOR SALE!

                2005 Eric Clapton American Strat - Great condition for a good price! PM or email me!

                Gear (Before next buying spree):

                Taylor 814ce - 2005
                Terada Dreadnaught FW-47 - 1950's
                Fender American Strat w/ Kinman pups
                Boss GT-8 Multi-Effects Processor
                Fender Blues Junior Tube Amp
                Sensaphonics ProPhonics 2X-S IEM's

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great feedback. I agree about mahogany. However, the Taylor GS is large enough that the cedar/mahogany does ring out a bit "deeper" than the Auditorium. The GS is somewhere inbetween a Dread and an Auditorium in Size. I am familiar with the Taylor's you had mentioned. I did own a 414CE, but found it too deep.

                  So, what do you think the best combo for me is? I am mostly a fingerstyle player - no pick. However, I do strum a bit here and there on a few songs (this is why the 514 doesn't work for me - I should have never gotten rid of my Martin!). Anyway, I do like the Cedar top. But, perhaps Spruce/Rosewood would be the best combo - on a Grand Auditorium or OM size?

                  I've actually been playing for the past 31 years, but only have really gotten into it the past 10.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Moozikchk
                    Anyway, I do like the Cedar top. But, perhaps Spruce/Rosewood would be the best combo - on a Grand Auditorium or OM size?


                    This may be a good assessment for you. I, too, really liked cedar tops for a guitar but played equal amounts of strumming and flatpicking (you don't say you have equal amounts, so this may be different for you). Eventually I realized (through some active playing of MANY guitars at GC and beyond and the helpful advice of forumites here) that cedar probably wasn't the way to go, my flatpicking would sound muddy.

                    So I settled on a spruce/rosewood OM style guitar, as you say. Its an Epi Masterbilt (not a Taylor) but I imagine that basic similarities in wood type and in size aren't extremely different from guitar to guitar. *DUCKS FOR COVER AND QUICKLY ADDS THE FOLLOWING* Know, however, that every guitar is different and worth trying out for yourself. What sounds great with my strumming/fingerpicking style might not be the same with yours.

                    Ellen

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