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Recs for new guita, uh, maybe...

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  • Recs for new guita, uh, maybe...

    I have been playing a Seagull S6 for about three year now. I really like the guitar, both for the quality/money and the room at the nut. I have kinda stubby fingers, and to do any kind of finger pickin', I really need the roomy nut.

    Well, I have about 7-8 hundred dollars to spend on another guitar,and was wondering if I could get a new one with a roomy neck for that money, or would the sound difference be not so much?

  • #2
    If you are wanting a different sound you could always get another Seagull with a spruce top ...



    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/seagull-maritime-sws-folk-high-gloss-acoustic-guitar/581757000010000
    "Plunk your Magic Twanger, Froggy". Andy Devine

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    • #3
      I have the same problem as you. This is how I solved my problem. I had an S & P, Cedar 6 which has the same width at the nut as your S6 as they are very similar guitars. It was still a bit narrow for me so I saw an ad on Kijiji for an Art & Lutherie 12 string. I've changed the guitar over to a 6 string. A simple nut change was all that was required and now I have a nice 6 string with a 1 7/8' width at the nut. This is perfect for my large hands and fingers. Plus, I like the guitar.

      Now, you could do something similar and save some of your money or you could go an pick out a guitar you like and then take it to someone and have them replace the neck to your specifications or even do it with your S6.
      Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

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      • #4
        I have the same problem as you. This is how I solved my problem. I had an S & P, Cedar 6 which has the same width at the nut as your S6 as they are very similar guitars. It was still a bit narrow for me so I saw an ad on Kijiji for an Art & Lutherie 12 string. I've changed the guitar over to a 6 string. A simple nut change was all that was required and now I have a nice 6 string with a 1 7/8' width at the nut. This is perfect for my large hands and fingers. Plus, I like the guitar.

        Now, you could do something similar and save some of your money or you could go an pick out a guitar you like and then take it to someone and have them replace the neck to your specifications or even do it with your S6.


        The S6 specs say it has a 1.8 inch neck, and there is an "S6 Slim" with 1.7 inch nut. Those are a few thou either side of the "standard" wide nut spacing of many OM style guitars which is commonly called out at 1.75. All Taylors 3xx and above are 1-3/4, many OM's and other small bodied guitars are. I was reading a review of the Martin 0-28 in the latest AG mag - it is even wider. So lots of options out there. Remember too that most guitars with 1-3/4 nuts will be a 2-1/4 at the saddle (a full 1/8 wider) which fingerstyle players like.

        The problem with converting a 12 string is first a new nut will run $50 bucks and you really need to also convert the bridge. Depending on the model of the twelve it will have either the primaries or the octaves closest to the saddle - you should use the primary pin holes, but they will be shifted to one side. Also, depending on the model of 12 string it may have a thicker top plate and/or heavier bracing - you might be disappointed at the sound. You'll have the extra tuners and big headstock...

        Renecking any guitar will be expensive - a reset alone is $300+, add the cost of the neck and you're probably in the 5-600 range. However a good tech can fudge your string spacing depending on how you play (do you bend, do pull offs, thumb fret, like higher action...). Most guitars are set with about 0.125 spacing to the edge of the f/b but you can reduce that to as low as 0.110 depending on style.

        Last option might be a classical (2 inch nut) or one of the nylon hybrids (typically 1-7/8 to 2").

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        • #5

          The problem with converting a 12 string is first a new nut will run $50 bucks and you really need to also convert the bridge.


          I bought a bone nut for $11.00 and you can have it cut for around $15.00 if you can't do it yourself. An even cheaper way to do it is sand down the grooves on the original 12 string nut, re-cut it and mount it with a shim underneath it to bring it to the correct height.

          As for the string spacing it is not a problem if you use the primary pin holes as you mentioned. At least it wasn't on my A & L.

          Now, on my electric, I had to change the saddles as well as the nut but that was all. They were around $1.00 each.
          Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

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          • #6
            I bought a bone nut for $11.00 and you can have it cut for around $15.00 if you can't do it yourself. . . .

            That's quite a bargain to have a nut slotted. Locally (St. Louis) it runs around $45.
            Official HCAG “Theory-Challenged Hack”
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            • #7
              That's quite a bargain to have a nut slotted. Locally (St. Louis) it runs around $45.


              Well, it depends how you go about it. It can cost $25.00 or a bit more here if you go about it a different way than I did.
              Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

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              • #8
                Yer looking for roughly a just under 2" nut width. I can bet, even with the stubby fingers you can go 1.75". Most of the others are pretty much outta your price range, not all though. Martin comes to mind, some of the older were 1-7/8" and those are expensive. The Washburn guitars, specifically the R... whatever... series, it's a vintage thing, those are about 1.88" and not bad guitars. Here's a link-
                http://www.ebay.com/itm/Washburn-R320SWRK-Vintage-Style-Parlor-Acoustic-Guitar-w-Coffin-Case-NEW-/300640255087?pt=Guitar&hash=item45ff8e3c6f
                http://www.youtube.com/user/MrOddmanout1

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                • #9
                  You would be surprised in the difference between 1 3/4 and 1 7/8". Most people don't think it will make much difference if any but for one with that size of fingers, it can make the difference between a clean note and a buzzing note.
                  Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

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                  • #10
                    Not really, I have 3 with over size 1-7/8, two with 2" and my Martin with 1-3/4. And ukes...... but I do realize everyone is different, what works well or is switchable for me may not be for someone else.

                    Check that Washburn out. They're pretty nice guitars.
                    http://www.youtube.com/user/MrOddmanout1

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                    • #11
                      Thanks all for the help.

                      And Merry Christmas!

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