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  • Got an interesting offer at last night's gig...

    One of the guests was some sort of an director at the Tarrant County Youth Offenders Services and is involved with "The U-Turn Program", which provides juvenile offenders and their families with help to turn the Juvie's lives around through positive reinforcement and activities. I'd met her several (like nearly 20) years ago, when I was House Supervisor at a group home for Developementally Challenged adults, and she remembered me, and she wants me to start a couple of classes, one a class to teach basic guitar skills and one to put together bands, both planned as positive outlets for these kids. Probably start out as 3 or 4 guitar classes and 2 or 3 band classes, each an hour long. Hopefully we'll be able to time all of them for the same day each week.



    Supposed to get together with her in a couple of weeks to work out some details on how to get this all rolling, hopefully by March 1st.



    If we come to an agreement, I think I'm going to hit up some of my friends with music stores to donate some of their slower-moving mechandise (for tax write-offs), so that we'll have at least a basic PA and a few amps, drums and electrics for the band class. Also some playable acoustic guitars, as I'm told right now there's only two available (fortunately, both are Yammies). And lots of strings, either donated or at cost.



    Any suggestions are to what else I'll need to cover in these planning sessions/negotiations? Anyone here ever been involved in a project like this?
    God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

  • #2
    Likely the most important thing you'll need Terry, is patience, lots and lots of patience.



    Keep us informed, please, on how it's going with these kids. They have probably come mostly from broken homes and have had very little positives in their lives. Showing personal interest and kindness can help a lot to instil some positive self-confidence and respect in these ones.
    Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

    Comment


    • #3
      Likely the most important thing you'll need Terry, is patience, lots and lots of patience.



      Keep us informed, please, on how it's going with these kids. They have probably come mostly from broken homes and have had very little positives in their lives. Showing personal interest and kindness can help a lot to instil some positive self-confidence and respect in these ones.
      Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

      Comment


      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by Steadfastly
        View Post

        Likely the most important thing you'll need Terry, is patience, lots and lots of patience.



        Likely so...



        Keep us informed, please, on how it's going with these kids. They have probably come mostly from broken homes and have had very little positives in their lives. Showing personal interest and kindness can help a lot to instil some positive self-confidence and respect in these ones.




        According to the brochure she gave me, it's a intense, on-site only (meaning 24/7), 8-week course for the kids, and I'm wondering if only 8-weeks will significantly make that much of a difference, but I'm game to give it my best.
        God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

        Comment


        • #5






          Quote Originally Posted by Steadfastly
          View Post

          Likely the most important thing you'll need Terry, is patience, lots and lots of patience.



          Likely so...



          Keep us informed, please, on how it's going with these kids. They have probably come mostly from broken homes and have had very little positives in their lives. Showing personal interest and kindness can help a lot to instil some positive self-confidence and respect in these ones.




          According to the brochure she gave me, it's a intense, on-site only (meaning 24/7), 8-week course for the kids, and I'm wondering if only 8-weeks will significantly make that much of a difference, but I'm game to give it my best.
          God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

          Comment


          • #6
            Terry,

            I was involved several years back with a similar sounding program, helping troubled boys. I did not teach music courses, I taught welding classes to the boys.

            I found in my case the ones that wanted to be there in my class were fantastic to try and work with , the ones that did not want to be there were not nearly as pleasurable!

            Here they had to take some sort of a "class" they had to pick 3, choices on their lists.......The problem students were the ones who it was choice 3, Not a perfect system but it was what it was.



            I agree Patience is the number on requirement, As strange as it may sound, working with troubled youth, you must have a balance of fairness and strictness. Not knowing the situation of your possible students, I can only go by those I taught. You had to be kind and fair and understanding, But you also had to balance letting them know you were in charge. Some teachers tried to play the hard ass, that did not go over so well, it was more showing you were smarter and more aware than the students may have given credit for, also showing you would not take crap if it came down to it, kind of work with me and all is great work against me and it will not be so enjoyable! Of course even the few years passed since I did this, the times have made a great difference in what a "teacher is and is not allowed to do"



            The time I spent working with these students was very rewarding. I like to think many got something out of it. I was teaching welding, I am thinking with music you may be able to reach in more than I was able as we all know how music can touch a persons heart and soul!



            I can not second guess what you may need to do this, on a music stand point, you certainly have the experience to figure that out and feel your way. From many of the stories you have shared, all though I do not know you in real life person, I think you have the heart and mind set to take a task like this on.



            One word of advice which I am not sure how to phrase, or if what I am going to say will even make sense when typed......Give your students fair respect and trust, How ever be very prepared to yank that trust and make them earn it. Many times these troubled kids become very good at reading people and learning how to tell them what they want to hear (They are often good at playing you) If you find this happening you have to let them know you know it is happening and your not buying it! Then you can start to build a better more honest relationship with them......Make it clear you can not BS a BS er!



            Well it may or may not be what you were looking for but there is my two cents.



            Again I myself got much from doing it, and I like to think so did many of my students.

            Best of luck, look forward to hearing more!



            BTW mine was only a 9 week course, I still showed the kids I cared, taught a few basics, and think I inflicted a desire for some of them to pursue more. I am certain you will be able to do the same with at least a few.
            CapersI always knew I was Undecided, but now I am not so sureGreat acoustic Pick Ups at Reasonable priceshttp://www.jjb-electronics.com/our_products.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Terry,

              I was involved several years back with a similar sounding program, helping troubled boys. I did not teach music courses, I taught welding classes to the boys.

              I found in my case the ones that wanted to be there in my class were fantastic to try and work with , the ones that did not want to be there were not nearly as pleasurable!

              Here they had to take some sort of a "class" they had to pick 3, choices on their lists.......The problem students were the ones who it was choice 3, Not a perfect system but it was what it was.



              I agree Patience is the number on requirement, As strange as it may sound, working with troubled youth, you must have a balance of fairness and strictness. Not knowing the situation of your possible students, I can only go by those I taught. You had to be kind and fair and understanding, But you also had to balance letting them know you were in charge. Some teachers tried to play the hard ass, that did not go over so well, it was more showing you were smarter and more aware than the students may have given credit for, also showing you would not take crap if it came down to it, kind of work with me and all is great work against me and it will not be so enjoyable! Of course even the few years passed since I did this, the times have made a great difference in what a "teacher is and is not allowed to do"



              The time I spent working with these students was very rewarding. I like to think many got something out of it. I was teaching welding, I am thinking with music you may be able to reach in more than I was able as we all know how music can touch a persons heart and soul!



              I can not second guess what you may need to do this, on a music stand point, you certainly have the experience to figure that out and feel your way. From many of the stories you have shared, all though I do not know you in real life person, I think you have the heart and mind set to take a task like this on.



              One word of advice which I am not sure how to phrase, or if what I am going to say will even make sense when typed......Give your students fair respect and trust, How ever be very prepared to yank that trust and make them earn it. Many times these troubled kids become very good at reading people and learning how to tell them what they want to hear (They are often good at playing you) If you find this happening you have to let them know you know it is happening and your not buying it! Then you can start to build a better more honest relationship with them......Make it clear you can not BS a BS er!



              Well it may or may not be what you were looking for but there is my two cents.



              Again I myself got much from doing it, and I like to think so did many of my students.

              Best of luck, look forward to hearing more!



              BTW mine was only a 9 week course, I still showed the kids I cared, taught a few basics, and think I inflicted a desire for some of them to pursue more. I am certain you will be able to do the same with at least a few.
              CapersI always knew I was Undecided, but now I am not so sureGreat acoustic Pick Ups at Reasonable priceshttp://www.jjb-electronics.com/our_products.html

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by TESmith
                View Post

                Terry,

                I was involved several years back with a similar sounding program, helping troubled boys. I did not teach music courses, I taught welding classes to the boys.

                I found in my case the ones that wanted to be there in my class were fantastic to try and work with , the ones that did not want to be there were not nearly as pleasurable!

                Here they had to take some sort of a "class" they had to pick 3, choices on their lists.......The problem students were the ones who it was choice 3, Not a perfect system but it was what it was.



                I agree Patience is the number on requirement, As strange as it may sound, working with troubled youth, you must have a balance of fairness and strictness. Not knowing the situation of your possible students, I can only go by those I taught. You had to be kind and fair and understanding, But you also had to balance letting them know you were in charge. Some teachers tried to play the hard ass, that did not go over so well, it was more showing you were smarter and more aware than the students may have given credit for, also showing you would not take crap if it came down to it, kind of work with me and all is great work against me and it will not be so enjoyable! Of course even the few years passed since I did this, the times have made a great difference in what a "teacher is and is not allowed to do"



                The time I spent working with these students was very rewarding. I like to think many got something out of it. I was teaching welding, I am thinking with music you may be able to reach in more than I was able as we all know how music can touch a persons heart and soul!



                I can not second guess what you may need to do this, on a music stand point, you certainly have the experience to figure that out and feel your way. From many of the stories you have shared, all though I do not know you in real life person, I think you have the heart and mind set to take a task like this on.



                One word of advice which I am not sure how to phrase, or if what I am going to say will even make sense when typed......Give your students fair respect and trust, How ever be very prepared to yank that trust and make them earn it. Many times these troubled kids become very good at reading people and learning how to tell them what they want to hear (They are often good at playing you) If you find this happening you have to let them know you know it is happening and your not buying it! Then you can start to build a better more honest relationship with them......Make it clear you can not BS a BS er!



                Well it may or may not be what you were looking for but there is my two cents.



                Again I myself got much from doing it, and I like to think so did many of my students.

                Best of luck, look forward to hearing more!



                BTW mine was only a 9 week course, I still showed the kids I cared, taught a few basics, and think I inflicted a desire for some of them to pursue more. I am certain you will be able to do the same with at least a few.




                Very much appreciate your thoughts and advice!
                God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by TESmith
                  View Post

                  Terry,

                  I was involved several years back with a similar sounding program, helping troubled boys. I did not teach music courses, I taught welding classes to the boys.

                  I found in my case the ones that wanted to be there in my class were fantastic to try and work with , the ones that did not want to be there were not nearly as pleasurable!

                  Here they had to take some sort of a "class" they had to pick 3, choices on their lists.......The problem students were the ones who it was choice 3, Not a perfect system but it was what it was.



                  I agree Patience is the number on requirement, As strange as it may sound, working with troubled youth, you must have a balance of fairness and strictness. Not knowing the situation of your possible students, I can only go by those I taught. You had to be kind and fair and understanding, But you also had to balance letting them know you were in charge. Some teachers tried to play the hard ass, that did not go over so well, it was more showing you were smarter and more aware than the students may have given credit for, also showing you would not take crap if it came down to it, kind of work with me and all is great work against me and it will not be so enjoyable! Of course even the few years passed since I did this, the times have made a great difference in what a "teacher is and is not allowed to do"



                  The time I spent working with these students was very rewarding. I like to think many got something out of it. I was teaching welding, I am thinking with music you may be able to reach in more than I was able as we all know how music can touch a persons heart and soul!



                  I can not second guess what you may need to do this, on a music stand point, you certainly have the experience to figure that out and feel your way. From many of the stories you have shared, all though I do not know you in real life person, I think you have the heart and mind set to take a task like this on.



                  One word of advice which I am not sure how to phrase, or if what I am going to say will even make sense when typed......Give your students fair respect and trust, How ever be very prepared to yank that trust and make them earn it. Many times these troubled kids become very good at reading people and learning how to tell them what they want to hear (They are often good at playing you) If you find this happening you have to let them know you know it is happening and your not buying it! Then you can start to build a better more honest relationship with them......Make it clear you can not BS a BS er!



                  Well it may or may not be what you were looking for but there is my two cents.



                  Again I myself got much from doing it, and I like to think so did many of my students.

                  Best of luck, look forward to hearing more!



                  BTW mine was only a 9 week course, I still showed the kids I cared, taught a few basics, and think I inflicted a desire for some of them to pursue more. I am certain you will be able to do the same with at least a few.




                  Very much appreciate your thoughts and advice!
                  God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some 30 years ago, I was involved in playing music in a Juvie detention facility. The experience was very rewarding. Those kids respect and appreciate honesty, and can spot a bull****************ter a mile away Many are there because adults led them down the wrong path. Teach them a more excellent way!

                    Good luck with the noble project.
                    R.I.P. TAH & Dak

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Some 30 years ago, I was involved in playing music in a Juvie detention facility. The experience was very rewarding. Those kids respect and appreciate honesty, and can spot a bull****************ter a mile away Many are there because adults led them down the wrong path. Teach them a more excellent way!

                      Good luck with the noble project.
                      R.I.P. TAH & Dak

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Its all about being postive. setting clear rules and giving a lot of praise. You will be a great force for change.





                        nice idea for getting free gear (using tax write off).
                        Improve your guitar playing for as little as 99cents - www.ashleyjsaunders.com** 6 New books for 2013!! **

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Its all about being postive. setting clear rules and giving a lot of praise. You will be a great force for change.





                          nice idea for getting free gear (using tax write off).
                          Improve your guitar playing for as little as 99cents - www.ashleyjsaunders.com** 6 New books for 2013!! **

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Patience is the key factor, Terry. A virtue in which I'm sorely lacking.



                            There's a big church on the south side of town where they conduct a guitar, fiddle, mandolin and banjo workshop every Wednesday afternoon in the basement multi-purpose room for some of the local kids in the neighborhood who want to learn to play. A lot of the guys I used to jam bluegrass with go there every week to help out. I was invited by one of the guys to come down and try to help out with the guitar section.



                            I gave it a shot, but the huge generation gap and that "patience" thing was hindering my efforts. I felt like I was causing more harm than good, so I politely begged out of it after a few weeks of trying.



                            I salute you for even considering this venture. It's what the young people need today. Too many kids out there with too much free time on their hands. I feel the world would be a better place if more kids got into music than the violent video games and other distasteful activities so many of them are involved with.



                            Best of luck in this new venture, Terry. Keep us posted as to how it works out.
                            Three Dreads......2 Martins and 1 YamahaA fiddle, a mando, a uke, eight harmonicas, a Zoom H2, a Panasonic recorder, coupla penny whistles, an Italian made Titano accordion, three handguns, at least a dozen chess sets, more power tools than Bob Vila, and one old Westclox "Big Ben" wind-up alarm clock that still works! Oh, BTW, I forgot to mention my ocarina and maracas.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Patience is the key factor, Terry. A virtue in which I'm sorely lacking.



                              There's a big church on the south side of town where they conduct a guitar, fiddle, mandolin and banjo workshop every Wednesday afternoon in the basement multi-purpose room for some of the local kids in the neighborhood who want to learn to play. A lot of the guys I used to jam bluegrass with go there every week to help out. I was invited by one of the guys to come down and try to help out with the guitar section.



                              I gave it a shot, but the huge generation gap and that "patience" thing was hindering my efforts. I felt like I was causing more harm than good, so I politely begged out of it after a few weeks of trying.



                              I salute you for even considering this venture. It's what the young people need today. Too many kids out there with too much free time on their hands. I feel the world would be a better place if more kids got into music than the violent video games and other distasteful activities so many of them are involved with.



                              Best of luck in this new venture, Terry. Keep us posted as to how it works out.
                              Three Dreads......2 Martins and 1 YamahaA fiddle, a mando, a uke, eight harmonicas, a Zoom H2, a Panasonic recorder, coupla penny whistles, an Italian made Titano accordion, three handguns, at least a dozen chess sets, more power tools than Bob Vila, and one old Westclox "Big Ben" wind-up alarm clock that still works! Oh, BTW, I forgot to mention my ocarina and maracas.

                              Comment



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