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Looks like I'm gonna try and build a guitar...

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  • #91
    Aarrrrrgh! We can't seem to figure out how to keep the belt tight on the drum sander. The sandpaper belt overlapped and gauged out my cedar a bit. There's still a ways too go so it's still salvageable but it's taking soooo long and I can't make it out there more than once a week - and even then it's always late at night.



    So instead of working on the actual tone woods for most of the night I ended up cutting some spacers for my semi-solid acoustic mold and gluing up the delaminating pieces. Like everything else I've done thus far though the spacers are not perfect either.



    I may need to take a break...
    Cornelius Clodhopper

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    • #92






      Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
      View Post







      I may need to take a break...




      Probably a good idea, working tired and frustrated can lead to cascading mistakes or worse.
      <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot; HAVE FUN, TRY NOT TO HURT ANYONE AND EAT PLENTY OF GREENS&quot;</div>

      Comment


      • #93
        You're so brave, Kwak!! I could never build a guitar!
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><font color="DarkOrange"><br />
        Sorry in advance for my &quot;Engrish&quot;. My first language is French.</font></font><br />
        <br />
        <font size="1"><font color="red">MuZiKKKKKkkkkkkKKKKKKKKK!!!!</font></font><br />
        <br />
        <font color="DarkOrchid">/Misha</font></div>

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        • #94
          OK, I think my problem is that I don't have enough tools. I could really use a portable workbench to put my bandsaw on so that I can do the messy/loud stuff in the garage. I also hear that a used drill press is a GREAT thing to have. There are a few in the local Craig's List that are all under $50.



          Freeman, if you're listening I now know the full implications of TAS. Before I was worried about sneaking a $2000 guitar and now I'm sweating about sneaking in a $50 bench top drill press.



          FWIW my wife's got a new hobby now too. She's getting into making her own beaded jewelry. It's just cheap plastic stuff she got from the local craft store but it's pretty cool to see her do something like that again.
          Cornelius Clodhopper

          Comment


          • #95






            Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
            View Post

            OK, I think my problem is that I don't have enough tools. I could really use a portable workbench to put my bandsaw on so that I can do the messy/loud stuff in the garage. I also hear that a used drill press is a GREAT thing to have. There are a few in the local Craig's List that are all under $50.



            Freeman, if you're listening I now know the full implications of TAS. Before I was worried about sneaking a $2000 guitar and now I'm sweating about sneaking in a $50 bench top drill press.



            FWIW my wife's got a new hobby now too. She's getting into making her own beaded jewelry. It's just cheap plastic stuff she got from the local craft store but it's pretty cool to see her do something like that again.




            Wayyy cool for both of you, Neil



            And as Misha said, you are sooo brave. I'd never attempt a build of my own, though I've spent many years crafting various wood projects. I know what ya mean about TAS!

            Comment


            • #96






              Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
              View Post

              OK, I think my problem is that I don't have enough tools. I could really use a portable workbench to put my bandsaw on so that I can do the messy/loud stuff in the garage. I also hear that a used drill press is a GREAT thing to have. There are a few in the local Craig's List that are all under $50.



              Freeman, if you're listening I now know the full implications of TAS. Before I was worried about sneaking a $2000 guitar and now I'm sweating about sneaking in a $50 bench top drill press.



              FWIW my wife's got a new hobby now too. She's getting into making her own beaded jewelry. It's just cheap plastic stuff she got from the local craft store but it's pretty cool to see her do something like that again.




              Neil, I am listening (and enjoying watching your journey). Yes, TAS is certainly a cure for GAS (well, maybe not, you are already thinking about your 2nd and 3rd build, I'm thinking about my, what it it now, 8th and 9th?).



              When I built the first one I had a small wood tool shop - good planes and chisels and such - and have a band saw, table saw (which I hardly use) and drill press where I work (along with cnc mills and other neat toys). With each build I would add one major power tool to the quiver - a laminate router, belt sander, better Dremel, air compressor, bench buffer - and do one new task in the build (the first were mostly kits, the last few are scratch).



              A scratch built neck is probably the most daunting (and rewarding) - I did the stacked heel and scarfed headstock. Routing a 12 string slothead is kind of interesting.... However necks seem like the ideal place for a cnc and some of the most beautiful necks are coming from Hanalei Moon - i used one on my tricone and it is spectacular



              http://www.hanalei-moon.com/



              Speaking of necks, I happen to have a short scale dovetail Martin neck with t/r, fretted fretboard and even has the torch inlay that I would part with very cheaply, but it is much more fun to do all those steps yourself.



              The order that I would personally buy power tools are cordless drill motor, laminate router, band saw if possible or good saber saw (mostly for cutting out molds), drill press (very handy for pressing frets). When I want something thicknessed sanded I just run down to the local cabinet shop - costs me a buck or two to run the plates thru (yes, go at an angle to the grain). When you do decide to make a neck a band saw is necessary and there are some tricks using a table saw to do the heel. I buffed the first few with foam pads and my cordless drill, a real buffing wheel is really nice (and can burn thru the edge in nothing flat). I'm sold on spraying with a home compressor, but there are many other ways to finish.



              You've obviously figured out that you'll invest $500 or so in lutherie tools, but you use them all the time so get good ones. And I buy MDF by the sheets - always making some sort of jig or fixture.



              OK, I'll go back to my corner and continue watching. Have fun

              Comment


              • #97






                Quote Originally Posted by kwakatak
                View Post

                FWIW my wife's got a new hobby now too. She's getting into making her own beaded jewelry. It's just cheap plastic stuff she got from the local craft store but it's pretty cool to see her do something like that again.




                My aunt does this, and she's really good at it. She's making a good bit of money selling the jewelry at local art shops and stuff. I think it's totally cool. But I visited her a couple weeks ago and it seems that beadwork leads to making your own beads which leads to metalwork which leads to incurable TAS! It seems various Acquisition Syndromes affect more than just us guitarists.
                I should be practicing.

                Comment


                • #98
                  Regarding a portable workbench, doing what I do (carpenter), I have learned to make do with what's on site, and sawhorses are always one of those things.



                  A pair of good sturdy sawhorses can make as small or large a table as one needs, and careful and creative shim work can make it level, straight, and true, at whatever height you need.



                  Easy to make, cheap (2 - 2x4x8' and 2 - 2x4x10' and 4 smallish scraps of 1x or plywood), and they are useful beyond a single range of projects.



                  Drill press is nice. I miss mine.

                  Comment


                  • #99






                    Quote Originally Posted by Freeman Keller
                    View Post

                    Neil, I am listening (and enjoying watching your journey). Yes, TAS is certainly a cure for GAS (well, maybe not, you are already thinking about your 2nd and 3rd build, I'm thinking about my, what it it now, 8th and 9th?).



                    When I built the first one I had a small wood tool shop - good planes and chisels and such - and have a band saw, table saw (which I hardly use) and drill press where I work (along with cnc mills and other neat toys). With each build I would add one major power tool to the quiver - a laminate router, belt sander, better Dremel, air compressor, bench buffer - and do one new task in the build (the first were mostly kits, the last few are scratch).



                    A scratch built neck is probably the most daunting (and rewarding) - I did the stacked heel and scarfed headstock. Routing a 12 string slothead is kind of interesting.... However necks seem like the ideal place for a cnc and some of the most beautiful necks are coming from Hanalei Moon - i used one on my tricone and it is spectacular



                    http://www.hanalei-moon.com/



                    Speaking of necks, I happen to have a short scale dovetail Martin neck with t/r, fretted fretboard and even has the torch inlay that I would part with very cheaply, but it is much more fun to do all those steps yourself.



                    The order that I would personally buy power tools are cordless drill motor, laminate router, band saw if possible or good saber saw (mostly for cutting out molds), drill press (very handy for pressing frets). When I want something thicknessed sanded I just run down to the local cabinet shop - costs me a buck or two to run the plates thru (yes, go at an angle to the grain). When you do decide to make a neck a band saw is necessary and there are some tricks using a table saw to do the heel. I buffed the first few with foam pads and my cordless drill, a real buffing wheel is really nice (and can burn thru the edge in nothing flat). I'm sold on spraying with a home compressor, but there are many other ways to finish.



                    You've obviously figured out that you'll invest $500 or so in lutherie tools, but you use them all the time so get good ones. And I buy MDF by the sheets - always making some sort of jig or fixture.



                    OK, I'll go back to my corner and continue watching. Have fun




                    Thanks, Freeman. The way I figure, I need the drill press and they've come up on the local craig's list for $20-$35 for the small bench top models. I could've score Yamaha Junkie's but he sold it shortly before he gave me his 9" tabletop band saw - which has been very useful for cutting molds and templates. A router is next though a fixed sanding spindle would be nice too. Then you have the usual multipurpose tools such as a standard table saw and a belt/disc sander combo.



                    ...oh and course clamps. LOTS of 'em. I hear cam clamps are easy to make but I'm knocking myself out over the molds and bending forms. Maybe I should try making my spreaders first since my master form is nearly complete?



                    Meanwhile I'd like to score a bag of clothespins and a rolling pin as a sort of hand spindle for sanding.



                    I'm in the doghouse this month with the wife and kids though so it may not be a good time to push for TAS. As for my "workshop" I'm competing with teh kitteh for space.



                    BTW, it's not QUITE as bad as being in the doghouse but the other night I paid the price when kitteh made a deposit in the box.







                    As for the neck, as you can see I've got something to fall back on. It's a dovetail with modified V profile though - much better for a slope dread or TROM IMO. Like I said, I'd love to do some sort of mahogany/rosewood or mahogany/walnut stratified deal, not the stacked heel type though. I've been watching Yamaha Junkie busting his back on a 3-piece rock maple neck though which answers the question why you don't see many!



                    Now regarding the molds I was on the phone with YJ and he reminded me that he has some sort of template-tracing contraption with a tile cutter on it. I also bought some cleaner pine 1"x2"x6' strips to make some prettier spacers. The first set was pretty raunchy-looking and didn't cut very clean on the table saw. We'll see if we can get together reasonably early and maybe I can finally get the molds done. I still need to buy some hardware first though; I'm thinking wood screws instead of nails to keep everything tight. Then I'll move on to the spreaders.
                    Cornelius Clodhopper

                    Comment


                    • TAS goes on - I bought myself a gents saw last night. I'm trying to cut spacers for my semi-solid mold by hand but I see now that I need to purchase a miter box or fashion one on my own out of an old drawer. Once I get the mold and forms done in my home workshop I'm moving on to cutting out the bracing and it'll come in handy. If anyone knows where I can score a deal on a used jack or block plane? I'm not interested in using ebay/Paypal though.
                      Cornelius Clodhopper

                      Comment


                      • where are you?

                        Comment


                        • I ask because I have my old hand miter box from the old days that you could have.

                          Comment


                          • I appreciate it but I picked up a cheap $5 one today that will suit my purposes.



                            Today I went over to Yamaha Junkie's place and finished up thickness sanding my top down to 3.5mm. He finally figured out how to properly install the sandpaper roll - putting the 80 grit roll on only took him a couple of minutes compared to my previous visit where we were both getting frustrated. Anyway I'd been using 120 before and it was slow going. Things went much quicker for me once the 80 grit was installed and all the marring to my top went away quickly once I figured out that I'd been feeding the board in improperly. The trick is to keep the board flat on the conveyor belt (he has a Jett 10/20 drum sander) going in and coming out. I'd been holding the edges of the board but switched to using my fingertips to hold it flat in front of the drum when feeding the boards in and again on the other side of the drum as it came back out.



                            I figure I've got another day or two before I'm done sanding things and assembling the mold. Then I'll move on to tracing the outline for the sides so that I can move on to bending them.
                            Cornelius Clodhopper

                            Comment


                            • seems to be a never ending sanding and jig making exercise doesnt it?



                              Once they're all done (I enjoyed making them and dodging flying router bits lol) the fun really begins. I like the shop btw Neal .... just watch how it will "magically" start filling up with tools
                              <div class="signaturecontainer"><font face="Tahoma"><font face="Comic Sans MS"><font face="Century Gothic"><font color="Blue"><font size="4"><font size="2">imagination is </font></font>more important than knowledge. knowledge is limited. imagination encircles the world.</font></font></font></font><br />
                              <br />
                              <font face="Tahoma"><font face="Comic Sans MS"><font face="Century Gothic"><font color="Navy"><font size="3"><font size="2">viva fui in silvis<br />
                              sum dura occisa</font><br />
                              <font size="2">securi dum vixi tacui</font></font><font size="3"><font size="2"><br />
                              mortua dulce cano</font></font></font></font></font></font></div>

                              Comment


                              • Good luck Kwatak, hope it turns out good!!!

                                Jim
                                <div class="signaturecontainer">Black Alvarez RD20S<br><br>Blue Snark<br><br>Wampler Ego Compressor<br>&quot;He That Hath The Son Hath Life, He that hath not the son, Hath not Life&quot; I John 5:12<br><br><br><font color="Blue">Alvarez Alliance Sr member</font><br><br><br><br>&quot;He that hath the Son hath Life, He that hath not the Son, hath not Life&quot;<br><br>1 John 5:12</div>

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