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Rosewood vs. Mahogany for back & sides.

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  • Rosewood vs. Mahogany for back & sides.

    Hi guys, quick question.

     

    Which of the two (Rosewood & Mahogany) will produce the 'warmest' tone on an acoustic ? (...if the top is the same on both)

    I am obviously referring to the back and sides now.

     

    Thanx

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  • #2

    Mahogany

    R.I.P. TAH & Dak

    Comment


    • guitarcapo
      guitarcapo commented
      Editing a comment

      I've always been of the opinion that other factors probably play a WAY larger influence on the sound a guitar makes.

      If by "warmer" you mean a guitar that's got more mids and fundamental with fewer overtones, I'd recommend a smaller guitar like an OM.

      A shorter scale length decreases the string tension which will dull the sound a bit as well.

      Another recipe might be a larger guitar with a moderate density hardwood top/soundboard like koa or mahogany.

      Cutting an ebony saddle or using a material like buffalo horn for the saddle would be a good strategy for taking an existing guitar and "warming" the tone.

      Of course there's also phosphor bronze alloy strings.

      The fact of the matter is that the back and sides don't contribute as much to the sound an acoustic guitar makes as all the hype would lend people to believe.


  • #3

    SirJackdeFuzz wrote:

    Hi guys, quick question.

     

    Which of the two (Rosewood & Mahogany) will produce the 'warmest' tone on an acoustic ? (...if the top is the same on both)

    I am obviously referring to the back and sides now.

     

    Thanx


     

    I believe your question was short and to the point.  Pick Rosewood or Mahogany for warmest sound?  Mahogany if you have any jazz in your gene pool.  Good Luck! 

    Rosewood is prettier IMO.  If you get Rosewood just use a thicker pick or a Jazz shaped gemstone pick in the 2.0mm+ range and your warmth will be there.  If you buy Mahogany and want a brighter sound do the opposite, thinner plastic pick or a gemstone pick in the 1.5mm to 1.8mm pick.  Also.....Go OSU Buckeyes this weekend.

     

    Don't buy a gemstone guitar pick. They're like your favorite snack; you can't stop with just one.

    Comment


    • #4
      Yea come to think of it, an archtop acoustic gets that sound. Something like a Gibson L4 would be nice.
      Originally Posted by DToad:

      Lets face it- today's GOP is all about the richest one percent exploiting the dumbest fifty percent.

      Comment


      • Tony Burns
        Tony Burns commented
        Editing a comment

        Id say Mahogany is warmer - E.I Rosewood is brighter -

        some brands or makers are warmer than others -age of the instrument is also is a factor

        you need to play a guitar to see if its what you want !


    • #5

      You've not exactly made it clear what you mean by "warm", other than tacitly agreeing with the statement that it is "a guitar that's got more mids and fundamental with fewer overtones".

      If you compare identically built guitars, one mahogany, one rosewood, chances are far better that the mahogany back and sides (back in particular!) will sound "warm". The build of the guitar could likely enhance this. I'm betting that the majority of people who actually make their living building guitars would agree.

      Examples:

      Martin D-18 (pre 2012) vs Martin D-28.

      Taylor 500 series vs Taylor 700 series.

      Proud reject from the HCAG Civil Posters Society, Martin snob, vitriolic sociopath, and tantrumist

      Comment


      • SirJackdeFuzz
        SirJackdeFuzz commented
        Editing a comment

        To me, 'warmer' translate to more low end, and deff low mids too !


    • #6

      SirJackdeFuzz wrote:

      Hi guys, quick question.

       

      Which of the two (Rosewood & Mahogany) will produce the 'warmest' tone on an acoustic ? (...if the top is the same on both)

      I am obviously referring to the back and sides now.

       

      Thanx


      Mahogany

      Comment


      • #7
        Cedar is a great top wood for classical guitars and smaller body guitars. In a large guitar it sometimes can get overwhelmed by heavy strumming so that chords can sound mushy. Cedar tops sound old and played-in when new but don't improve with age as much as spruce guitars.....and yea they are more prone to damage.
        Originally Posted by DToad:

        Lets face it- today's GOP is all about the richest one percent exploiting the dumbest fifty percent.

        Comment


        • #8

          SirJackdeFuzz wrote:

          Hi guys, quick question.

           

          Which of the two (Rosewood & Mahogany) will produce the 'warmest' tone on an acoustic ? (...if the top is the same on both)

          I am obviously referring to the back and sides now.

           

          Thanx


           

          There are a number of websites that have sound clips of guitars that are similar in everything except the backs and sides.   Go here and compare a 000-18 to a 000-28 and a D-18 to a D-28  (I tried to paste the clips into this posting but wasn't able).  

          http://www.maurysmusic.com/martin_guitar_video_clips

          Do the same for similar Blueridge models

          http://www.maurysmusic.com/blueridge_video_clips

          Just make sure that you select the same basic body size and shape, don't compare a D-18 with an OM-28.   Obviously there will be differences in bracing, strings, picks, technique and a lot of other things that influence sound, but if you do enough you should get a general feel for the sound of different woods.

          The Podium used to have sound clips but I can't find that any more.

          Comment


          • SirJackdeFuzz
            SirJackdeFuzz commented
            Editing a comment

            Thank you very much for all the friendly help and usefull info thus far !

             

            Keep 'em comming !

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