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  • Mirage guitar works?

    I bought one.Supposedly guitar blue book says their made 50 at a time only 500 per series.All solid wood,hand scalloped bracing ect.Just wondering if anyone else has heard of them or tried one.

  • #2
    I got one too. Actually sold a Heritage H-150 Les Paul to get it. It was in a pawn shop and I played it. Was floored by the sound, but I can't seem to get much information about mine. Have you found anything out. Mine is solid mahogony with a heel-less neck. Plays like a 60's SG jr. but sounds much much bigger.

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    • #3
      We need pics, and maybe a clip for the Annex.

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      • #4
        I am the owner of Mirage Guitar Works. Just for a bit of info, the previous poster was correct in that only 50 guitars of the same model were produced at one time with electric models limited to 500 guitars in a series. The acoustic series- since they are so labor intensive to design and prototype- were ongoing models with an occasional deletion or addition to the line.

        The acoustic versions included the B series (D style solid spruce/solid mahogany w/abalone, 6 or 12, cutaway or full bodied), C series (jumbo solid spruce/tiger maple w/abalone, 6 or 12, cutaway or full bodied), F series (F style solid spruce/indian rosewood w/wood binding, 6 or 12, cutaway or full body), G series (solid cedar top, sycamore back and sides, bolt neck, full body only), E series (solid sycamore top, sapele back and sides, bolt neck, full body only), and the F612 (6/12 doubleneck, solid spruce top, indian rosewood back and sides, bolt necks, cutaway only). The B, C, and F were also available with electrics. All included hard cases except the doubleneck which had a gig bag..

        The electrics included the Beram 1 (H/H 6 string), Beram 2 (S/S/H 6 string), and Beram 12 (H/H 12 string); the Biggs 1 (H/H 6 string), Biggs 2 (H/H/H 6 string), and Biggs 3 (soap/soap 6 string); and the Ervin (S/S/H 6 string). All included hard cases

        In 2006 there was a catastrophic fire that destroyed the factory, warehouse, and all the tooling. Despite the high demand that I return to building guitars the loss was too great. You just can't replace almost 30 years of templates, drawings, and special tools.

        The unusual part of all this it that it seemed that drummers prefer my guitars... and I think I figured out why. Drummers have to have a keen ear for tone to tune those things so they are much more in tune than most guitar players.

        Paul Gobat
        Mirage Guitar Works LLC
        mirageguitarworks@yahoo.com

        Comment


        • johnh1019
          johnh1019 commented
          Editing a comment

          Hi Paul, I count myself among the fortunate few to own one of your guitars. I found it at a Music Go Round in Timonium, Md. After the fire the store snapped up a lot of the ones that survived. (The fretboard still had a lot of soot on it, and turned my fingertips black when I played it.)

          It has no sticker inside, so I don't know the model; I understand it was a prototype. It has what I believe is a cedar top, beautifully flamed maple back and sides with a lovely inlay running down the middle of the back, no pickguard, and a tone that I have not found in any other guitar. I played it at an office Christmas party last week, and was beseiged by players wanting to get their hands on it.

          I am very sorry for the loss of your shop, and your life's work. But I thank you for creating one of the most beautiful and beautiful-sounding guitars I ever have or will own.


      • #5
        What a strange series of posts. I was sure this was some kind of spam set-up until Paul wrote that his company is finished.

        Sorry to hear about your loss Paul. As a luthier myself, I can only imagine what you must have felt when you lost everything in the fire. The same thing happened to Michael Gurian. Sad.

        Comment


        • #6

          The unusual part of all this it that it seemed that drummers prefer my guitars... and I think I figured out why. Drummers have to have a keen ear for tone to tune those things so they are much more in tune than most guitar players.

          Paul Gobat
          Mirage Guitar Works LLC
          mirageguitarworks@yahoo.com


          You must have better luck with drummers than I do. Hell, none of my drummers have had a decent sense of rhythm, let alone an ear for a tune.
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><font color="Teal"><div align="center"><b>C70man: The world needs more guitar teachers and less politicians.</b></div></font></div>

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