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  • #46
    Sounds like the mojo was in the skin and not in the drum. Did you ever try to get another head of the same type / brand?
    **********

    "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

    - George Carlin

    "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

    - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

    "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

    - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by 1001gear View Post

      Ok i'm back up on an ssd. 120G - should do for now. I'm wondering though, if I installed all my programs on a second 120G SSD would I gain the space without a speed penalty? The storage stuff of course would go to a big HDD. Just looking to save the 50 bucks over a 250G ssd.


      If I am understanding you correctly, you have one 120GB SSD that you're using as your system (C:\) drive, and are thinking of adding a second SSD as a program drive, correct?

      I would think you'd still see a significant increase in speed by doing so. I can't tell you whether you'll take a "hit" from having the programs on a separate drive and not on the boot drive with the operating system, but if you do, it's going to be very minor. In fact, it may even be faster to do it that way - especially if the system needs to make a call to the program data and the OS data on the drive at the same time. If they're on the same drive, those things would have to be done sequentially / serially, whereas with the OS and programs on separate drives, they may be able to be done closer to simultaneously / in parallel.

      I use my C:\ drive for my OS and programs, but I do have separate drives for my sample libraries as well as for audio files, and that is a big help too.

      The other thing that is a HUGE help is disk caching. Lots of RAM is your friend, and it will make a big difference in overall system performance. If your DAW supports it, load everything into RAM - not just the program, but all of the audio and sample files. Things work much faster from RAM than from any kind of disk drive - even a SSD.
      **********

      "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

      - George Carlin

      "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

      - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

      "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

      - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post



        If I am understanding you correctly, you have one 120GB SSD that you're using as your system (C:\) drive, and are thinking of adding a second SSD as a program drive, correct?

        I would think you'd still see a significant increase in speed by doing so. I can't tell you whether you'll take a "hit" from having the programs on a separate drive and not on the boot drive with the operating system, but if you do, it's going to be very minor. In fact, it may even be faster to do it that way - especially if the system needs to make a call to the program data and the OS data on the drive at the same time. If they're on the same drive, those things would have to be done sequentially / serially, whereas with the OS and programs on separate drives, they may be able to be done closer to simultaneously / in parallel.

        I use my C:\ drive for my OS and programs, but I do have separate drives for my sample libraries as well as for audio files, and that is a big help too.

        The other thing that is a HUGE help is disk caching. Lots of RAM is your friend, and it will make a big difference in overall system performance. If your DAW supports it, load everything into RAM - not just the program, but all of the audio and sample files. Things work much faster from RAM than from any kind of disk drive - even a SSD.
        Correct; a second drive for programs. This because with 15G of written data indicated, C: shows 60G used space and 50G left !

        It's good to know that a second SSD might even be beneficial. Can I just install to a regular folder on the new drive and leave the original Prog/Prog x86 as is and on C:?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by 1001gear View Post

          Ok i'm back up on an ssd. 120G - should do for now. I'm wondering though, if I installed all my programs on a second 120G SSD would I gain the space without a speed penalty? The storage stuff of course would go to a big HDD. Just looking to save the 50 bucks over a 250G ssd.
          Ooh! Something I vaguely know about!

          Running a 120GB SSD with just my OS on it and a few core programs that I want to run quickly, then four more high capacity HDDs (between 320GB and 1TB) for media, games, software and general storage (photos and documents etc). I find this setup works pretty well with a respectable boot time and it's adequately fast. Running in conjunction with the AID FX8350 8-core CPU OC'd to 4.5GHz and 8GB RAM, soon upgrading to 16 with a water cooler. My general opinion is that if you can afford to upgrade to all SSDs, then by all means do so. You will gain performance and reliability, and above all it will be noticeable. But if you're looking to save money, HDDs are fine for running things that you're not overly bothered about being super fast and fine for storage

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          • 1001gear
            1001gear commented
            Editing a comment
            A second 120G SSD is under 50 bucks so that's plan A. I have a 4T usb Wd for right now but I'd like to use a 1T WD black internally mainly for convenience and the 5 yr warranty.

        • #50
          Originally posted by MarvelUndies View Post

          Ooh! Something I vaguely know about!

          Running a 120GB SSD with just my OS on it and a few core programs that I want to run quickly, then four more high capacity HDDs (between 320GB and 1TB) for media, games, software and general storage (photos and documents etc). I find this setup works pretty well with a respectable boot time and it's adequately fast. Running in conjunction with the AID FX8350 8-core CPU OC'd to 4.5GHz and 8GB RAM, soon upgrading to 16 with a water cooler. My general opinion is that if you can afford to upgrade to all SSDs, then by all means do so. You will gain performance and reliability, and above all it will be noticeable. But if you're looking to save money, HDDs are fine for running things that you're not overly bothered about being super fast and fine for storage
          Cool post. It sounds like you have a very nice system!

          My main DAW computer has a SSD in it for the boot drive, with separate hard drives for audio files and for sample libraries. At the moment I am using HDDs for everything except the boot drive. I may eventually replace the sample library drive with a SSD. I think you're fine with a SSD anywhere you will be using it to read from a lot... I'm less comfortable with the idea of writing huge files to them over and over, and since I do my sessions cached (I'm running 16GB of RAM and getting ready to upgrade that to 32GB) I don't really see any advantage to using SSDs for my audio drives at the moment... although I think that eventually SSDs will pretty much replace hard drives.
          **********

          "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

          - George Carlin

          "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

          - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

          "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

          - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

          Comment


          • #51
            Originally posted by 1001gear View Post

            Correct; a second drive for programs. This because with 15G of written data indicated, C: shows 60G used space and 50G left !

            It's good to know that a second SSD might even be beneficial. Can I just install to a regular folder on the new drive and leave the original Prog/Prog x86 as is and on C:?
            What OS are you running?

            I'd leave the OS on the C drive and then just install your programs to the second / new SSD.
            **********

            "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

            - George Carlin

            "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

            - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

            "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

            - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

            Comment


            • #52
              Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

              What OS are you running?

              I'd leave the OS on the C drive and then just install your programs to the second / new SSD.
              I'm using Win7 HomeP (lol) (the only version my key would activate) Thankfully it's SP1 although the subsequent rollup requires an expert.

              Windows configured the install as best the bios could although now I'm booting from EFI instead of the new drive. I don't quite understand the principle but it seems to be working.

              There are already 30 plus things installed so If I install a DAW - even Audacity, I'd feel safer if it's to a second drive. The small ones are around 40 bucks give or take and the one I got - cheapest one on Amazon, does fine in personal use. Main questions regard naming of the new folders and will Windows distinguish 32 from 64 bit without issue?

              The board has 6 connectors but according to one mobo app I only have 2 channels: 1) SATA 6 and 1) SATA 150 both in use so I'm not exactly sure how or if plugging in 2 more drives is going to work - or wok for that matter. Already reset the Win10 machine - i7 too (woopee, thrills) so there's no going back.
              Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








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              • #53
                If you're running a 64 bit version of Windows you'll need a compatible DAW - same thing if you're running a 32 bit version. Putting it on the second drive shouldn't be a problem for the OS, as long as the DAW is compatible with the OS you're running.
                **********

                "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                - George Carlin

                "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                Comment


                • #54
                  Speaking of which, I had a HP laptop that I used from 2011 to 2015 that I ran into the ground. I recorded over twenty albums and tons of EPs and singles. My new laptop can't properly function with my Digitech RP-150, though I can still manage to record with it. But the old one came with me all over the South and served me well.

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                  • #55
                    Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post
                    If you're running a 64 bit version of Windows you'll need a compatible DAW - same thing if you're running a 32 bit version. Putting it on the second drive shouldn't be a problem for the OS, as long as the DAW is compatible with the OS you're running.
                    Yes I'm aware of this. I have a 64bit installation for whatever good that does. I'm just concerned that since Windows supplies separate folders for 32bit and 64 bit apps, I'd have to somehow distinguish that in custom locations.

                    back on topic, My surf box seems to have gained quite a bit of mojo.
                    Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








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                    • #56
                      Originally posted by Phil O'Keefe View Post

                      My main DAW computer has a SSD in it for the boot drive, with separate hard drives for audio files and for sample libraries. At the moment I am using HDDs for everything except the boot drive. I may eventually replace the sample library drive with a SSD. I think you're fine with a SSD anywhere you will be using it to read from a lot... I'm less comfortable with the idea of writing huge files to them over and over, and since I do my sessions cached (I'm running 16GB of RAM and getting ready to upgrade that to 32GB) I don't really see any advantage to using SSDs for my audio drives at the moment... although I think that eventually SSDs will pretty much replace hard drives.
                      Sounds like your system surpasses mine, dude! Out of interest, are you running a Mac or PC? I found Macs to be fantastic studio machines and PCs great for gaming, what with all the constant parts swapping involved. Still, if the good lord didn't intend for me to have the best of both, He wouldn't have given us dual-booting.
                      Not being much of a studio whiz (I use Audacity for recording straight to the PC from a multi-FX unit and Toontrack to program my drum tracks) and more of a gamer and software nerd, I haven't experimented much with sample libraries on SSD vs. HDD. In fact, my studio machine is a humble Dell I rebuilt with spare parts. It only has one SSD, 3GB RAM and an ancient Intel dual core CPU at around 3GHz. It's the only PC I've owned that supports Realtek HD Audio Manager, which is the only audio driver I've used that allows lag-free recording via the onboard sound I/O. But it's more than capable as its sole purpose is to serve as a studio machine for recording, then all mixing and post-production is done on the main beastie.
                      Anyway, if I had to guess I'd say that keeping your samples on a SSD would certainly speed up your loading times. If you have a USB 3.0 memory stick and USB 3.0 ports (which I'm going to assume you do), it may give some idea of what benefits you may get from such an upgrade if you kept some samples on said stick. But I say this with absolutely no knowledge of data transfer rates of USB 3.0 vs. SATA.

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                      • #57
                        Originally posted by MarvelUndies View Post

                        Sounds like your system surpasses mine, dude! Out of interest, are you running a Mac or PC?

                        I use both Mac and PC. It's all for audio, although the Mac is also used online and for writing.

                        My PC is a self-built tower with a PT HD3 rig, my Mac is a quad core i7 MacBook Pro using a mobile interface.


                        I found Macs to be fantastic studio machines and PCs great for gaming, what with all the constant parts swapping involved. Still, if the good lord didn't intend for me to have the best of both, He wouldn't have given us dual-booting.
                        I probably should have considered using Boot Camp or something, but I've been using multiple, dedicated machines for so long now that I'm comfortable with it.

                        Not being much of a studio whiz (I use Audacity for recording straight to the PC from a multi-FX unit and Toontrack to program my drum tracks) and more of a gamer and software nerd, I haven't experimented much with sample libraries on SSD vs. HDD. In fact, my studio machine is a humble Dell I rebuilt with spare parts. It only has one SSD, 3GB RAM and an ancient Intel dual core CPU at around 3GHz. It's the only PC I've owned that supports Realtek HD Audio Manager, which is the only audio driver I've used that allows lag-free recording via the onboard sound I/O. But it's more than capable as its sole purpose is to serve as a studio machine for recording, then all mixing and post-production is done on the main beastie.
                        Sounds like the SSD for sample libraries would be better suited to the main beastie... I'm not even sure you could run SSDs in your older machine. But since you mix on the new one (do you overdub on that machine too?) it might make more sense to run it in the faster / newer machine.

                        Anyway, if I had to guess I'd say that keeping your samples on a SSD would certainly speed up your loading times.
                        That's the main benefit. When you're loading a multi-GB sample library, it takes a while... and a SSD drastically decreases the time involved.

                        If you have a USB 3.0 memory stick and USB 3.0 ports (which I'm going to assume you do), it may give some idea of what benefits you may get from such an upgrade if you kept some samples on said stick. But I say this with absolutely no knowledge of data transfer rates of USB 3.0 vs. SATA.
                        USB 3.0 is 5 Gbit/s (625 MB/s), but not all thumb drives can sustain that speed. SATA III is 6Gb/s. SATA 3.2 is upwards of 16Gb/s.
                        **********

                        "Look at it this way: think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of 'em are stupider than that."

                        - George Carlin

                        "It shouldn't be expected that people are necessarily doing what they appear to be doing on records."

                        - Sir George Martin, All You Need Is Ears

                        "The music business will be revitalized by musicians, not the labels or Live Nation. When the musicians decide to put music first, instead of money, the public will flock to the fruits and the scene will be healthy again."

                        - Bob Lefsetz, The Lefsetz Letter

                        Comment


                        • #58
                          That's good stuff. Slowly getting to grips with Macs and OSX, but I was raised on Windows so it's taking some time to adjust. My PC just about shaves it for gaming purely for the slightly better compatibility with certain games and the aforementioned parts swapping.

                          Dual-booting can be a headache, though. If I were to attempt it, I'd have to use Hackintosh because of my AMD processor. But if I had the money, I'd definitely invest in the real deal. Mostly for the gorgeous design of them. Yeah, I might not get on with the peripherals, but it's not like I can't change them. I've also been using multiple machines over multiple monitors and it's not too bad. Takes up a bit more space than I have available, but it works well.

                          There are SSDs in both machines, and everything is stored on the one drive that the studio PC has including the drum software and its sample libraries. Again, for whatever reason my old Dell is the only computer I could get the software to work on. Every other computer I tried just wouldn't install it. But since the Dell has a practically vanilla OS and a SSD, it does run beautifully. As for mixing, it could be done on either machine, but the main has the better speakers, nicer peripherals and the main monitor is a 32" LED TV. Just comes down to convenience and preference, really.

                          Thanks for the tech lesson, man. It's genuinely stimulating and interesting to talk to you about this kind of stuff. Always eager to learn! Just about gotten overclocking my CPU, GPU and RAM down, even if it has made my room almost uninhabitable with the increase in temperature. Think it's time to look into better cooling...

                          May I ask what interface you're using, if any? Like I said, I'm going straight to the line-in on my on board chipset which works fine, but in the future I'd like to be able to record onto my main computer. Two computers works for the moment, but in the interest of saving space it may be time to condense. Plus it means that the Dell becomes a viable organ donor!

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                          • #59
                            Cool stuff ^^
                            They said - you know, <they>.. the hibernate file is useless. That and knocking down the page file saved close to 30 gig. woot. Discovered symbolic links so I should be ok if I have to move the program folders. Still need to decide on what new drive.
                            Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...








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                            • #60
                              If you're looking to keep your drives as uncluttered as possible, I use a free software package called CCleaner, made by Piriform. My 120GB SSD kept filling up and I had no idea why. Running the cleaner for the first time literally freed up around 60GB. Apparently, every time the machine is restarted, it adds another 300MB or so in system reports and stuff that is just unnecessary clutter.
                              Last edited by MarvelUndies; 09-05-2016, 09:16 AM. Reason: I have fat thumbs. Stupid phone.

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