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  • #31
    Originally posted by Danhedonia View Post
    So, re-reading the thread, some synopsis:

    * You are interested in cleans these days
    .
    Yes, somewhat. What I'm "ideally" interested in and like the best is a very slightly distorted clean sound. A good clean foundation with just a little bit of dirt to break it up. Kind of a country lead sound, or a mellow blues distortion. That Orange 35LDX seemed to deliver that sound in spades, and had a nice clean channel to boost. I also wouldn't mind a slightly dirtier channel for Classic Rock type stuff, too. I have no use what so ever for serious overdrive.

    As I stated before, I was absolutely blown away by the clean, reverb-laden "Twin Reverb" setting on the Mustang, and also the clean channel of the Super Champ X2. I think this is a throwback/yearning to my high school band when I had a Peavey Studio Chorus 210 and my bandmate had a Princeton Chorus 210. I was always envious of that sparkling clean channel he had.

    So here's what's happening. I talked to a friend this morning who was going to trade his CR35LDX into a big box store. We talked it over, and he's going to give me a good deal on that. I'm helping him out by giving him a little more than the big box store was going to give him on trade in, and he's helping me out by selling it to me at less than it would normally go for on the used market. It's only a few months old and in mint condition, so I could probably easily resell it for what I'm putting into it (in the event I'm ultimately not happy).

    I liked that amp a lot auditioning it. Also, it is a little bigger and louder than a lot of the other models I was looking at. That will come in handy if I decide to use it at gigs more quickly than I thought. With the MP3 input, I predict it will get a lot of use around the house for general music amplification, and may eventually go to my son when he gets a little older.

    Long term, I'm sure I'll upgrade to a tube amp.

    Comment


    • Emory
      Emory commented
      Editing a comment
      I too love the Twin Reverb model, main one I play with. Not into distortion. Finally found someone who had Peavey SC 210. Had one, loved it, sold when moved to Asia. Well played on your choice, btw

  • #32
    I think you did well. Enjoy.
    Besides being a guitar player,
    I'm a big fan of the guitar.
    I love that damn instrument.
    -Steve Vai

    Comment


    • #33
      You can get a store demo of the Yamaha THR-10 for around the 215 mark on feebay. GREAT amp!!! And while I agree that the demo was professionally mixed and engineered, it is still one of the best amps on the planet for the money.
      My Music: www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=440762 Some of my guitars: 64 or so Domino Beatle bass; 70 Epiphone ET260 bass 73 Ibanez 2398; 79 Epiphone Genesis; 79 Manoman; 78 Gibson L6S; 95 Ibanez JS-700; 04 Samick Lasalle JZ3: 05 Ibanez AS73; 07 Gary Kramer Simulator T and quite a few others.

      Comment


      • #34
        Originally posted by badpenguin View Post
        You can get a store demo of the Yamaha THR-10 for around the 215 mark on feebay. GREAT amp!!! And while I agree that the demo was professionally mixed and engineered, it is still one of the best amps on the planet for the money.

        I saw a video of Vince Gill the other day talking about his favorite telecasters. It appeared he was plugged into a THR-10, which was then miked up.

        Comment


        • #35
          I think you did well, too, but I also think that as time goes on, you'll want a nice small combo tube amp, which does "A good clean foundation with just a little bit of dirt" perfectly.

          Fender does a handsome job of this, but used Peaveys are the real sweet spot on that market. You can find them $400 and under and some of them are lifelong amps.

          Comment


          • #36
            Congratulations and Happy New Amp Day. Hope the Orange is all you could want it to be.
            Official HCAG “Theory-Challenged Hack”
            Member of the IBANEZ ACOUSTIC ASSASSINS
            Proud Member of The Alvarez Alliance
            Member of the Schecter Society
            Person-2-Person on the Web

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            • #37
              Cool congrats. You might even find when you "upgrade" to a tube amp...that you are not feeling that upgraded. Just sayin'. I do love tube amps but with the quality of SS amps today and the fact that tube amps are well, less forgiving and need to be just at the right level to really outshine an SS amp, you may just have a full circle. Your love for the Mustang leads me to believe this. And I tend to agree.

              I was gonna suggest a SS fender like a Princeton 65 or super chorus. Great sounding amps.

              Comment


              • #38
                Originally posted by Danhedonia View Post
                I think you did well, too, but I also think that as time goes on, you'll want a nice small combo tube amp, which does "A good clean foundation with just a little bit of dirt" perfectly. Fender does a handsome job of this, but used Peaveys are the real sweet spot on that market. You can find them $400 and under and some of them are lifelong amps.
                There is no doubt in my mind that I will eventually want a tube amp, particularly if/when I ever switch over to using an electric in my gigs (all acoustic format currently). Do the current Fender blues series amps do the typical "Fender Clean" sound, or are they just all grit? My bandmate had one of the tweed Fender amps back in the mid 90s, and it did not. It was just a grit machine. My Peavey Blues Classic was far more versatile.

                Comment


                • #39
                  The haters will not say this, but if you want great Fender cleans without the insane price tag, check out one of the Fender Hot Rod amps. I've owned 3 of them, and they all did the Fender clean extremely well. Took pedals well, too!
                  My Gear:
                  2015 Taylor 214ce Deluxe
                  2008 Fender American Standard Telecaster
                  Takamine acoustic
                  Fender P-Bass

                  Comment


                  • #40
                    The unfortunate answer is "it depends," and it can depend on more than year / model line / version. The DRRI has some nice sounds (I'm not as over the moon for it as some) but it's pricey. And the Hot Rods can do some nice cleans as well, but they're often intensely loud to where it can literally be hard to dial in a reasonable volume (if you're used to acoustic).

                    I would instead suggest a few things:
                    * used Peaveys. I just ... really like them. esp 70's/80's. Can have those bottomless, bell ringing tones ...
                    * the new crop of small-maker hand wired heads. Some of them are outrageously expensive, but you can also get a nifty 10W head (which, when paired with an efficient cab) might provide all the kick you seek for under a grand. They are quite nice, if not highly or easily resaleable. But they are phenomenal amps, many of them. Here's a great example of one such builder: http://www.marshamps.com/
                    * I have a nice older Blues Deluxe, and it does cleans with a little 'extra' quite well. But honestly I have not heard a more recent BD I've liked as much.
                    * For heads, the recent trend in micro heads has yielded some great amps. I like the flexibility of being able to plug into different speakers, but I do not gig on guitar and don't have to move my stuff a lot.

                    There is a ton of variance in tonality between types of speakers and tubes, etc., too. You've already proven you can find something you like by shopping. You will again.

                    As for SS vs. Tube, an old argument - truth is, both have gotten much better dollar over dollar recently (this neatly ignores whether vintage prices are worth it). But you cannot convince me that there are certain overtones you could have with that sweet Tele that a SS will accurately mimic. Just two different animals.

                    P.S. I am NOT a "tube sound is always preferable" guy. Love SS and digital sounds and often choose them.

                    Comment


                    • #41
                      Tube really gives you less for the money in terms of sound. They're also higher maintenance and more fragile. Also heavier. All this is because a tube amp requires expensive output and power transformers and tubes. At the end of the day you end up with something like a Champ or maybe a little more....but without much in the way of sound versatility other than some EQ and that one sound. Basically a one-trick pony.

                      A solid state amp will usually have lots of digital effects built in for the same money. While it might not have that subtle warmth to the cleans that tubes give. It will be more quiet and in a bedroom setting offer you loads of sonic versatility.

                      Tube amps are fun and great for gigging if you have lots of accessory gear like pedals to get your versatilty. But on a budget and in the house....go for solid state and forget all the tube hype. You give up a LOT in terms of versatility, durability, cost and noise floor when you go tube in that situation.
                      "I don't want to be immortalized through my work. I want to be immortalized by not dying." Woody Allen

                      Comment


                      • #42
                        Completely disagree: if you play through a tube amplifier, you learn to play the harmonic tones and the 'extra' sound of driven tubes. That is diametrically opposed to digital effects. It is a matter of choice. And given the OP's stated interest, it will sound better. A smaller amp will break up earlier.

                        I don't see a connection between the # of pedals and tubes - in fact, one thing a good mid size tube combo will do is give you a fair range of choices in sound.

                        Sure, SS amps are good for bedrooms - but OP is already out of the bedroom and gigging. And let's get real: you don't get a nice American Tele to play in your bedroom.

                        Not trying to be nitpicky, but I'm about to walk into a room to do some tracking where there are:
                        * a JC-120
                        * a '94 US Blues Deluxe
                        * a '68 Twin
                        * a G-K M250
                        * Peavey Classic 212
                        * JC-77
                        * a few other SS and tube-y things.

                        I couldn't imagine not having both. Some times I crave the cool, calm, nearly hermetic world of digital FX and a SS amp. Other times, there is no way to bring the rock without a tube, regardless of overall volume and with a lot of range of saturation.

                        This is what makes horseraces, I suppose. I just couldn't imagine having that Tele and not having a nice, warm tube amp to play it through.

                        Comment


                        • #43
                          I don't think you can go wrong with a 30 watt Vox Valve Reactor combo. I don't believe they make them any longer, but nonetheless, a great hybrid tube amp for not much cash.
                          __________________________________________________
                          ...one very scary Tele!

                          Comment


                          • #44
                            Originally posted by Danhedonia View Post

                            Sure, SS amps are good for bedrooms - but OP is already out of the bedroom and gigging. And let's get real: you don't get a nice American Tele to play in your bedroom.
                            A couple of points here. Yes, I am out of the bedroom and gigging. However, my solo gigs and my band are acoustic. I don't really have any gigging application for an electric right now. At this point, it's more of a learning tool, as I want to improve my lead playing chops.

                            Second, that's not a nice American Tele. It's an inexpensive Mexican Tele. Not that it makes a difference, but it may help you to understand that I'm not pairing a $100 amp with a $1400 guitar,

                            When the time comes that I'm ready to start playing electric at gigs, there is no doubt I'll be getting a bigger amp that's tube based


                            Comment


                            • #45
                              Originally posted by guitarcapo View Post
                              Tube really gives you less for the money in terms of sound. They're also higher maintenance and more fragile. Also heavier. All this is because a tube amp requires expensive output and power transformers and tubes. At the end of the day you end up with something like a Champ or maybe a little more....but without much in the way of sound versatility other than some EQ and that one sound. Basically a one-trick pony.

                              A solid state amp will usually have lots of digital effects built in for the same money. While it might not have that subtle warmth to the cleans that tubes give. It will be more quiet and in a bedroom setting offer you loads of sonic versatility.

                              Tube amps are fun and great for gigging if you have lots of accessory gear like pedals to get your versatilty. But on a budget and in the house....go for solid state and forget all the tube hype. You give up a LOT in terms of versatility, durability, cost and noise floor when you go tube in that situation.


                              I'm sorry but that is a lot of broad brush, my friend.

                              Some tube amps come with a high noise floor, some are very quiet, even at whisper late night levels.

                              Tubes deliver distortion and overdrive. If a player never uses od or distortion then a SS amp is great. Also, it's been my expereance that a tube amp will be more dynamic sounding with distortion and overdrive pedals then an SS amp. This is pretty univesally agreed upon. I get that there are budget considerations. The under $300 SS amps are great for new guys who are not yet sure what they want their sound to be.
                              Besides being a guitar player,
                              I'm a big fan of the guitar.
                              I love that damn instrument.
                              -Steve Vai

                              Comment



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