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Lets build something that looks like an ES-175

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  • #61


    Well, that didn't work - the wood cracked again so I tried with another piece of mahogany - this time with nice straight grain (I figured that being on the inside of the horn no one would notice, besides that's the only choice I have). This time I used my heat blanket instead of the hot pipe



    The piece came out good and I fit it into the rim. There is a lot going on here and unfortunately I didn't take pictures of all of the steps



    There is a wedge shape block that forms the point of the horn and the part that fits against the neck block has to be exactly the correct width - that will flow into the neck heel and needs to be exactly one half of the width of the neck at the 14th fret. I fiddled with this a lot before gluing up - but forgot the camera laying on the work bench.

    Here is the rim with the clamps off laying on the original ES-175 plans showing the change in shape of the cutaway.



    In a way I like it more than the really sharp pointed horn (my wife said its "not as horny". I e-mailed that picture to Jesse with a brief explanation for his approval and he said it was OK.

    Whew
    Last edited by Freeman Keller; 08-15-2014, 11:29 AM.

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    • #62
      Next thing to do is glue in the kerfing. "Kerf" is the term for the cut of a saw blade, "kerfing" is a strip of wood with a whole lot of little saw blade cuts - it is nice and flexible and bends around the rim to provide a gluing surface. I buy kerfing all ready made - it would be a real hassle to set up a saw to make it.

      Those are special kerfing clamps available at lutherie supply houses and they are very expensive.



      Last step here is to glue in some little mahogany side braces that run across the grain. As prone as this wood is to splitting I don't want to take any chances



      I think the sides will be just fine and I'm feeling better about everything now.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Freeman Keller View Post

        I think the sides will be just fine and I'm feeling better about everything now.
        Freeman, glad to see things back on track after that setback - and then another. I've enjoyed your explanations and seeing your different methods for bending the sides - especially the hot pipe.

        Looking great!

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        • #64
          Wow, this is a great build thread!
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          • #65
            Thanks Newbuilder. Hope your handle means that you build too - one of the reasons I like to post build threads is to inspire others to try their hand at it.

            Next part is just tedious - sanding the rim perfectly flat and then putting a little angle in it to match the curve of the top and back. I've got two sanding blocks - one big and flat, the other curved at 16 foot radius



            And I just keep working my way around the rim



            Some people put sandpaper in their radius dish with double sticky tape - I never had good luck with that but this seems to work



            Check it as I go with a "straight edge" with the 16 foot radius. I drew this with AutoCAD with 16 foot on one side and 25 on the other (normal top dome for an acoustic) and cut it out on a laser cutter - I miss the machine shop where I used to work...

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            • #66
              I may not be commenting on every post but you can be certain I'm enjoying every one of them
              Thanks for the education it's great

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              • #67
                Originally posted by gardo View Post
                I may not be commenting on every post but you can be certain I'm enjoying every one of them
                Thanks for the education it's great
                That makes it all worth while

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                • #68
                  Looking good. I love this phase of the build; it's starting to look like a substantial structure and not just a bunch of bent pieces of wood. Could you forward on the specs for your pipe bender? I'm interested in messing about with that kind of stuff - while it's still warm enough outside to do so without risk of burning my house down! ;-)
                  Cornelius Clodhopper

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by kwakatak View Post
                    Looking good. I love this phase of the build; it's starting to look like a substantial structure and not just a bunch of bent pieces of wood. Could you forward on the specs for your pipe bender? I'm interested in messing about with that kind of stuff - while it's still warm enough outside to do so without risk of burning my house down! ;-)
                    Hard to believe that in, what, three weeks, we've come from



                    to here



                    The hot pipe is very simple - its a 6 inch long 2 inch pipe nipple with a cap from Lowes or Home Depot. A couple of 2 inch U brackets hold it to a piece of angle iron which I clamp to my work bench. The torch is something you would use to sweat solder copper water pipe. LMI sells practice scrape, you can also use cut off pieces from anything you are working on - I can't stress the importance of practice to get a feeling for when the wood wants to bend. I did a couple of sides this way then decide it was time to buy the Fox machine.

                    I tend to do a lot of fiddling around at this stage of the build - maybe I know that once the lid goes on the box it is the end of the chapter. I won't show pictures of sanding braces and tapping the top and drinking coffee and all the important lutherie things that go on here, but one thing is important.

                    The brace don't just end at the sides, they are let into little pockets in the kerfing. I learned that the simplest method of doing this is to make all the braces the same height at their ends - say the thickness of this piece of plastic binding



                    Here is the same thing for the back



                    (now jumping ahead to the next frame since I can only do four pictures per posting)

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                    • #70
                      Now put the Dremel tool on its little router base and set the depth of the cut to the thickness of that piece of binding



                      mark and route out the little pockets



                      Do a little more tapping and fiddling and sanding and coffee drinking - finally its time to sign the top



                      and pop it into the oven



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                      • #71
                        Aren't tools great !
                        Having the right tool for the job makes all the difference .

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                        • #72
                          Awesome as usual Freeman. You should never worry whether people are following these threads or not. Even if I'm not posting constantly I come back here specifically for these threads.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by gardo View Post
                            Aren't tools great !
                            Having the right tool for the job makes all the difference .
                            TAS is even worse than GAS. "Honey, can I have a new router?"

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by koiwoi View Post
                              Awesome as usual Freeman. You should never worry whether people are following these threads or not. Even if I'm not posting constantly I come back here specifically for these threads.
                              Yes, very much this. It's especially evident when you check the view count of this thread against the others.

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                              • #75
                                can't wait to see the finished guitar, as always great thread FK
                                thx for sharing

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