Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lets build something that looks like an ES-175

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Lets build something that looks like an ES-175

    Background:

    To understand this guitar you need to know my friend Jesse. Jesse is what I would call a modern renaissance man. He is one of the best, if not THE best, custom motorcycle painters – his work appears in many of the custom motor cycles mags (if you haven’t noticed there is frequently a motorcycle in those pictures). Here is the simple ghost flames that he put on my Sporty



    And the more usual paint job on his personal bike



    If you like that sort of thing, check out his website, if you click on the ‘helmets” page there are a few guitar that he’s painted.

    http://www.trickpaint.com/

    On weekends Jesse likes to take a little drive in the country

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2G7KRk-fQME

    He climbs rock and ice and has been on our SAR unit, builds street rods as well as choppers, works a day job at one of our hydro electric dams and, oh yeah, plays guitar.

    Jesse has traded paint jobs for a couple of vintage Les Pauls (gives you an idea of what his paint jobs go for) and one day I was doing some fretwork for him. He said “I don’t have an acoustic, would you build one for me?”

    I said, sure, what do you want. He said “I want an acoustic that looks like an ES-175”. I said “not a problem” and as soon as he left, googled ES-175 to see what I had agreed to…
    Last edited by Freeman Keller; 07-29-2014, 12:59 PM.

  • #2
    Gibson ES-175:

    The ES-175 is one of the iconic Gibson jazz guitars, played by many jazz luminaries; Jim Hall, Joe Pass, Wes, Jimmy Raney, Bill Frisell, Pat Metheny, among others. It is a hollow body with deep Florentine (sharp) cutaway, laminated pressed arched top and back, floating ToM bridge, tailpiece, f-holes and usually P90’s altho I guess different pickups were used. Modern ones look like this



    I haven’t played a “real” ES-175 but there are some clones on the market and I did play a beautiful hand made one at the recent GAL conference. Frankly I’m not impressed with their acoustic sound. This might be a problem….

    I needed some clarification from Jesse on exactly what he meant by “an acoustic that looks like an ES-175”. His answer –“ it needs to be the size and shape (including depth) of the ES, with the Florentine cut, f-holes, tailpiece and bridge. Everything else is your call. Oh, yeah, it needs to be red”

    Huh? Red – I hope you mean cherry sunburst or something like that – not candy apple red with little skulls painted all over it. “Well, my furniture is all red and this will sit out on a stand in the music room so it needs to be red” says Jesse. We’ll see.

    Hang on, my name is Mister Toad and this is going to be a wild ride….

    Comment


    • #3
      I'll add one more thing right here. I'm having a bitch of a time posting picture and that could kill this whole gig. Normally I upload the picture to a hosting site, grab the URL and put it inbetween [img]...[/img] but some of these aren't appearing. Even worse is to try to use Vbulletins little image posting tool - it locks my computer up tight as can be. I've just spent a half hour trying to post a picture of a guitar (that worked in a previous thread) - that's time I should have been in the shop making sawdust.

      If this continues I'll just stop the thread

      Comment


      • #4
        Oh man, somebody fix this, stat!

        Edit: Hmmm, well it looks like that Gibson link is just the page and not an image file per se and the others you posted turned out just fine. Can you do another test from your favorite hosting site?
        Last edited by Preacher; 07-29-2014, 03:05 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks harmoney central... no typo...
          my p0asting days are numb bird...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Preacher View Post
            Oh man, somebody fix this, stat!

            Edit: Hmmm, well it looks like that Gibson link is just the page and not an image file per se and the others you posted turned out just fine. Can you do another test from your favorite hosting site?
            my jpegs seem to be working fine. This was an aspx or something from the Gibson site - I had posted it a while back in another thread and it worked fine. If anyone has a nice picture of an ES-175 how about posting it here so I can talk about it.

            I think my pics will be OK - we'll see.

            Comment


            • #7
              If you are using Windows, right click on the image from your link, choose View Background Image.

              You get a new window with just the picture. Right click on this and choose Copy Image.

              Come into your post here, right click and choose Paste.
              http://www.harmonycentral.com/t5/Electric-Guitars/I-smeared-bacon-fat-on-my-strat-now-it-stinks/td-p/16697195

              Comment


              • #8
                http://www.harmonycentral.com/t5/Electric-Guitars/I-smeared-bacon-fat-on-my-strat-now-it-stinks/td-p/16697195

                Comment


                • #9
                  OK, we've got a couple of pictures, how abut the design criteria:

                  In order to make this sound halfway tolerable unplugged I need to make a more or less standard flat top – I’ll brace it with an X but more like an archtop. The f-holes aren’t a problem and while I don’t like the sharp cutaway, it shouldn’t be a problem either. I’ve got some nice stiff Lutz spruce – that should make a good soundboard and if it wasn’t for the “red” I’d suggest figured maple for back and sides, instead I’ve got some figured mahogany which makes a mahogany neck obvious. Ebony fingerboard and headplate, for right now I’m leaning towards ebony binding and pick guard but we can decide that as we get farther along. I’m going to build a fairly substantial arch into the top, but not carve or laminate it. I’ll do all the prep, Jesse can shoot the nitro (red).

                  I told him that even tho he doesn’t plan to plug in I would install a sound board transduce while the box was open – that way if it sounds crappy we can make it sound crappy and LOUD. And the ace in the hole is that we can play it in the white – if it really sounds crappy I can hog out a couple of holes in the top and drop in some P90’s.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Disclaimer:

                    I am not a “luthier” – please don’t use that term. I have too much respect for the true luthiers that I know, call me a “luthier-in-training”. I’ve built a dozen or so acoustic instruments and one electric. I make mistakes and learn with each one. I work in a small garage shop with minimal tools – with each build I try to add a significant tool to my collection. If you think GAS is bad, get TAS (‘Honey, I need a new router…”). If you want to kill a couple of hours here is the thread that I did a few years ago on my home made Les Paul

                    http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/...la-41/1104633-

                    I’ll be posting a few days after I do something. Most of the time there are parallel operations going on but I’ll try to linearize things – maybe show the carving of the neck all at once. I’ll take breaks, go on trips, wait for something I’ve ordered – but I’ll try to keep this more or less flowing – I won’t drag it out. I’m guessing it will take four or six weeks to build it and another four to six for the finish – we should have a guitar in October.

                    Please feel free to comment and ask questions, but remember that I am not a pro and in a lot of cases I’m just winging it. There are lots of different ways to do things – I appreciate hearing about yours but I don’t want to get into big discussions about why I do it this way.

                    Lastly, one of the reasons I like doing build threads is to try to inspire people who want to build an instrument to give it a try. I’ve got lots of resources so if this appeals to you, let me lead you astray, er, try to help you build a guitar. OK, lets build this thing

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In for the FK skills win
                      Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything. - Plato

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Subbed.
                        Gear:
                        2013 Official Luthier's Forum Medium Jumbo (Western red cedar/mahogany)
                        2012 McKnight McUke (soprano ukulele, redwood/mahogany)
                        2010 Martin D-16GT
                        2006 Larrivee OM-03R
                        1998 Fender American Standard Stratocaster (natural ash finish)
                        1989 Kramer Stryker
                        197? Epiphone Texan FT-160N

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Freeman Keller View Post
                          Gibson ES-175:

                          I haven’t played a “real” ES-175 but there are some clones on the market and I did play a beautiful hand made one at the recent GAL conference. Frankly I’m not impressed with their acoustic sound. This might be a problem….
                          An ES-175 is not an acoustic guitar - it is an electric guitar with a hollow body.

                          An L5CES is an acoustic guitar with pickups.
                          the real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            First setback:

                            I’ve got most of the wood stickered away in storage (on a shelf in my wine cellar) but it is all thicker than I want to work with. Normally I just take it to my local cabinet shop and they run it thru their thickness sander – I can stand there with my calipers and thump on the wood until it sounds right (whatever that means), then I go home and put it together. My cabinet shop informs me they have a fancy new sander but it won’t go down thin enough for what I need – I box up a bunch of wood and send it off to LMI with instructions on how thick I want it….

                            Oh well, this will give me a chance to make some jigs and templates and stuff. Every guitar that I build needs two pieces of tooling - the mold or jig that will hold the body while its being built and the form to bend the sides around. Fortunately they get made at the same time. I cut a piece of 3/4 MDF into 4 pieces and clamp them together with flathead machine bolts (the flat heads let them slide around on the band saw table). Trace one half of the body and cut them out

                            You get an innie and an outie -



                            The innie becomes the form for bending the sides in my Fox style bender - you'll see that in a few days



                            The outie becomes the mold or jig. I knew I needed something for the Florentine cutaway, so I made the little gizmos in the center - again, an innie and an outie.



                            Part of that goes into the form for the cutaway, the other will be the bending form for the piece that becomes the cut



                            I know this stuff is really boring but its a very important part of the operation and I like to build molds that will last a while if I ever want to build another like this. Stay tuned

                            (interesting, it just told me that I couldn't have more than four images in a posting - that seems new. Oh well, at least I can see my pictures now)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Freeman Keller View Post
                              First setback:

                              I know this stuff is really boring but its a very important part of the operation and I like to build molds that will last a while if I ever want to build another like this. Stay tuned
                              Boring nothing,This is exactly what I want to see
                              Last edited by gardo; 07-30-2014, 08:33 PM.

                              Comment













                              Working...
                              X