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  • #16
    I wouldn't call the MIM Squier Tele I owned "professional" level. It had better material than an Affinity, but felt and sounds like an Affinity with a lot of pickup noise.
    .

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    • #17
      I suppose it depends on what you deem to be professional grade, as it were.

      If professional means, you could gig it at the local bar, then most MIMs will fit that bill quite nicely.
      If it means Mark Knopfler wouldn't take it on a 60-date tour around the world, well, yeah...
      LearnTheUkulele.com * SongwritingCircle.com * MojoCaster.com * GuitarVideoReviews.com * ThreeChordGuitar.com Listen to my music at www.UkenSmile.com!Now on twitter: @MojoCaster - offering private lessons via Skype

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      • #18
        Originally posted by BlackHatHunter View Post
        I suppose it depends on what you deem to be professional grade, as it were.

        If professional means, you could gig it at the local bar, then most MIMs will fit that bill quite nicely.
        If it means Mark Knopfler wouldn't take it on a 60-date tour around the world, well, yeah...
        Fender MIMs, especially within recent years, are fantastic and you can find many that are flawless. Squier MIM was not.
        .

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        • #19
          Originally posted by BlackHatHunter View Post
          I suppose it depends on what you deem to be professional grade, as it were.

          If professional means, you could gig it at the local bar, then most MIMs will fit that bill quite nicely.
          If it means Mark Knopfler wouldn't take it on a 60-date tour around the world, well, yeah...

          This is excellent perspective regardless of the instrument being discussed. philthumb

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bucksstudent View Post

            Fender MIMs, especially within recent years, are fantastic and you can find many that are flawless. Squier MIM was not.
            I beg to differ, I had a recent one with a seven piece body and traded it straight across for a 90's Squier branded MIM that sounded 100% better to my ears before mods, but to each his own. That's what makes the world go round.
            "Prayer is when you talk to God. Meditation is when you're listening. Playing the piano ['guitar'] allows you to do both at the same time." -Kelsey Grammer

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            • #21
              agreed... I recently picked up a MIM Squire Strat, and it's every bit as good, both in fit/finish and sound as any of the MIM Strats I've owned.
              My Gear:
              2015 Taylor 214ce Deluxe
              2008 Fender American Standard Telecaster
              2006 Fender American 60th Anniv. P-Bass
              Takamine acoustic
              Fender P-Bass

              Comment


              • #22
                I stand by my original comments. US squiers are just Squiers - that's all they are. Nice enough guitars, but not the same as a US standard of the time despite what some people convince themselves of.

                And the made from US parts MIM Squiers is BS and rumors. The ones I have seen have not been in the same league as a US Strat of the time, not talking hardware either. People buy into these stories because they so want to believe it's true. But that doesnt make it true.
                "A guitar saved my life"

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                • #23
                  And I stand by my original comment. I'd rather have a two piece body than one made like a butcher board with random pieces of wood. I've had that guitar and I couldn't get it to sound right regardless what mods I did. My 93 MIM Fender Squier Series just ate it for lunch. So I traded it straight across for a 98 MIM Squier that sounded and played better before mods. Crazy right? Well only if you hear with your eyes. Oh and I have that American Standard that seems to be the benchmark for this conversation. Yeah it's worth a whole lot more but my modded MIM Squiers sound and play just as good. Truth is I prefer playin my Fender Squier series Strats a tad cause I prefer the vintage frets and the six point trems.
                  Last edited by wankdeplank; 07-26-2014, 10:22 PM.
                  "Prayer is when you talk to God. Meditation is when you're listening. Playing the piano ['guitar'] allows you to do both at the same time." -Kelsey Grammer

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Stringbender11 View Post
                    I stand by my original comments. US squiers are just Squiers - that's all they are. Nice enough guitars, but not the same as a US standard of the time despite what some people convince themselves of.

                    And the made from US parts MIM Squiers is BS and rumors. The ones I have seen have not been in the same league as a US Strat of the time, not talking hardware either. People buy into these stories because they so want to believe it's true. But that doesnt make it true.
                    They aren't in the same league as USA Fenders, but the MIM Squiers were definitely made with better materials than any of the overseas models from the 90's.
                    .

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                    • #25
                      And the made from US parts MIM Squiers is BS and rumors. The ones I have seen have not been in the same league as a US Strat of the time, not talking hardware either. People buy into these stories because they so want to believe it's true. But that doesnt make it true.

                      http://www.talkbass.com/threads/squi...steins.738867/

                      "90’s Fender Mexico w/ Black Decal: A Mystery Uncovered You might have heard of mexican made Fender guitars with a black headstock decal, sometimes associated with some mystery Squier Series made in Mexico. It’s true that there actually was a “Squier Series” that was made by Fender in Mexico and featured a black decal on the headstock, but not all mexican made Fender guitars with such a black label were part of that very “Squier Series”. Since there appears to be a lot of confusion and half-knowledge about these guitars out there, I decided to do some research on my own.

                      The black label was used by Fender Mexico for a limited time only between 1993 and 1998. It can be found exclusively on the rather short lived mexican “Traditional” and “Squier” series for the Telecaster, Stratocaster and Precision Bass. Usually, Squier is to Fender what Epiphone is to Gibson. In this very case, the use of the name “Squier” had nothing to do with the actual Squier brand, as the series was named “Squier Series”, but it was by all means a Fender series, not a Squier series. The keyword is “series”, not “Squier”. The regular mexican “Standard” series was available too at the time, but it already featured the same silver-ish logo that is still used for it today. However, between 1993 and 1998, both labels (the black AND the silver-ish one) were used for mexican made Fender guitars, but for (slightly) different guitars.

                      The guitars with the black label consisted mostly of overstock american made Fender necks and bodies. The parts were shipped to Mexico for assembly with mexican made pickups and far eastern hardware and electronics. The overall quality of these guitars turned out to be below the Squiers made in Japan and Korea, whose production came to an end around the time the mexican made guitars with the black label surfaced, yet above Squiers made in China and Indonesia, whose production had not yet begun at the time. The guitars ended up on the american and european market for just about as much as a guitar from the regular “Standard” series would cost at the time.

                      Some (not all!) of the guitars were sold for a few bucks less as they came with 1-ply pickguards and hardware of slightly lesser quality. Those guitars (and those only!) had an additional smaller “Squier Series” label on front of the headstock, right were the artist models have the artist’s signature. Though some owners probably sanded off their “Squier Series” label, it is not true that all guitars with a black label had a “Squier Series” label in the first place. Most guitars with the black label featured tuners and bridges of decent quality as well as 3-ply pickguards. These guitars did not have the additional “Squier Series” label and were called the “Traditional Series”, which was stated nowhere on the headstock but the guitars were listed, advertised and sold as such.

                      The “Traditional Series” can be considered the slightly better but the “Squier Series” sure is the more obscure. At the end of the day, there really is not that much difference between the two. The most significant difference can be found on the Telecaster. The Telecaster from the “Traditional Series” had the traditional through-body stringing, while the Telecasters from the “Squier Series” were Top Loaders with different bridges, saddles and no string holes in the back.

                      The guitars from that very “Squier Series” are official and genuine Fender guitars like any mexican made Fender guitar regardless, and if you have a mexican made Fender Telecaster, Stratocaster or Precision Bass with a black label and a serial number beginning with MN3, MN4, MN5, MN6, MN7 or MN8, you have a genuine Fender guitar – with or without a small “Squier Series” label." (end quote)


                      If it's just a rumor, it's a pretty prevalent one.

                      And I've never said that these guitars were the equivalent of the American line or even the MIM Standards of the period, only that they were excellent mod platforms. It's true that the pickups could be a little harsh sounding. The mods I did to mine were nut, shim, shield pickguard, pickups and trem block. The bridge plate saddles and screws are excellent quality. I can say this because I've experienced the opposite with a Dillion S-100 Strat copy I owned where the screws stripped and the saddles were of lesser quality. The tuners look cheap but in fact hold tune essentially as well as the Fender stamped variety. When you lift the hood on these things (MIM Squier) you really see the attention to detail with very tidy wiring harness, and very well soldered connections - even a checklist for an inspector. Also the bodies are extremely well routed, the equivalent of a US Strat (actually my 89 American has a swimming pool route). You might not appreciate this until you pop the hood on a cheap Asian copy. I had Pignose Strat (internet hype) for a week and shielded the pickguard before I sent it back - the insides of that thing looked like somebody had gotten in there with a pocket knife (I did better whittling as a young boy), not to mention the uneven frets or the sprout.

                      You can pay a little or you can pay a lot. I admit that I have a bit of a bias towards older is better. But how can you justify fret sprout on some of the newer MIMs (even the $900 Roadworn series) or the butcherblock bodies on the MIM Standards? My buddy has a beautiful American Standard that I helped him pick out back in about 2007 as I recall. At the time I tried to talk him into getting the Eric Johnson Sig model that was much better set up and only three or four hundred dollars more at the time. But he wanted to save $ - he insisted on American made but didn't want to pay any extra. What he walked out with was an American Standard in Sunburst that is a beautiful guitar but not very well set up. He and I worked on it, but it just won't dial in right - you fight the action, and now the truss doesn't want to budge. At one point in the set-up process he popped the neck off to reveal a big divot in the body's neck pocket. I tried to convince him to take it back at the time but he didn't want to.

                      I always say if you come across one of these for less than two bills don't hesitate. I once paid over $100 for a neck alone on Ebay that turned out to be blackface Fender Squier Series (small Squier sanded off). Excellent neck though.
                      "Prayer is when you talk to God. Meditation is when you're listening. Playing the piano ['guitar'] allows you to do both at the same time." -Kelsey Grammer

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                      • #26
                        3 things to ponder; Brand Snobbery. How many 'big name' guitars didn't feel right or sound good, even after a proper setup? Ease of play. Does it feel good in your hands and on a strap? Tone. Does it sound good to you? Does it ring and sustain without being plugged in?
                        Best regards,
                        Rich
                        www.guytronix.com

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Richard Guy View Post
                          3 things to ponder; Brand Snobbery. How many 'big name' guitars didn't feel right or sound good, even after a proper setup? Ease of play. Does it feel good in your hands and on a strap? Tone. Does it sound good to you? Does it ring and sustain without being plugged in?
                          This is all true. The price is the big variable in the equation. Is there something "special" about an American Squirer or is it hype

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                          • #28
                            I have one of those Black Label 'Fender by Squier' strats mentioned in that article. It had the single ply pick guard, cheap Asian electronics and hardware, but the body was light and resonant and the neck slim and nice to play. It came cheap as a basket case (was being sold as a Fender with the small circular Squier decal sanded off) and with new hardware & electronics became my number 2 guitar for a long time.

                            As for the question 'is there something special' about these, I'd have to say no - not in the same way as there is about the late 80s MIJ strats, but the black label job I have feels and sounds better than all the typical MIM standard strats that I'd played up to late 2000s.
                            Last edited by Ancient Mariner; 07-29-2014, 06:51 AM.
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                            • #29
                              I have a "black label (with "Squire Series")" P-Bass. I bought it in college in the late 90's. I think it's a '97 model. I have been playing with it ever since. Stock hardware has been rock solid. Stock pickups were not bad. Decided back then that I wanted some active pickups. So, I bought a set of Bassline pickups and had them installed. Put a new pick guard on it, and it has been amazing ever since. Solid as any other P-Bass I've ever tried.
                              My Gear:
                              2015 Taylor 214ce Deluxe
                              2008 Fender American Standard Telecaster
                              2006 Fender American 60th Anniv. P-Bass
                              Takamine acoustic
                              Fender P-Bass

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                              • #30
                                I guess it was about ten years ago that I came into my first Fender Squier Series. I knew a guy at the time that was moonlighting doing some fret work and other guitar repairs out of his garage. Kind of an interesting guy that would wheel and deal - I spent a few nights over there helping him work on used guitars I had acquired. He had this beautiful (to me) Candy Apple Red Telecaster that he'd taken in towards some work that reminded me a lot of the Tele that Muddy Waters used. I liked the way it sounded and noticed it was Blackface Fender (Squier Series) toploader and offered him $100 for it. Done deal. I eventually decided I wasn't a Tele guy and traded it (neck was a little too narrow for me and the toploader bridge design was a little problematic), but honestly, I've never played a better sounding Tele, and with the stock pickups. It had this twang in the bridge that made you sound like Buck Owens, with a really warm sounding neck pickup. I figured dang these things are really undervalued but now I was looking for Strats. It didn't take long before a 93 (Blackface Fender again) Strat showed up with the same candy apple red body and really cool looking (slightly reliced) board and again the bargain price of one bill. I played it once and was just bowled over by the thumping bass response, made the deal and never looked back (has a Pete Biltoft and two Lace Sensors in it now and hangs with anything). Truth is, I was never happy with the sound of my 2007 MIM after that, it just didn't have the punch or the sustain. I'd paid three bills for that one with a nice case on the used market and thought initially that I'd scored the deal of a lifetime (one of a kind beautiful wine red, tortoise shell pickguard) made for sponsored act. But it just always sounded harsh and thin to me even after numerous mods and upon inspection I discovered that the body was about seven or eight pieces. Found a mint 98 MIM Squier badged sunburst with a nice pau fero board that the guy wanted like $250 or something on Craig's and was running into a lot of Squier prejudice. I asked him about a possible trade and when he found out it was a newer silver faced "Fender" that would sell easier, I had him convinced. Played them side by side and we both agreed that tonewise the Squier was superior. Did the trade, kept the case of course, win, win as I got a superior sounding guitar with pristine frets and he got a guitar he could sell. So now I have two Fender Squier Series Strats, one with an alder body and maple board and the other with a poplar body and pau fero board, with different tonal characteristics but both sound wonderful. The weird thing is, as far as I can tell, my cheapy Fender Squier Series guitars have two piece individually routed bodies whereas my 89 American "Standard" has a three piece body with a swimming pool route. They all sound great and different enough for me to never consider selling one.
                                Last edited by wankdeplank; 07-29-2014, 10:46 PM.
                                "Prayer is when you talk to God. Meditation is when you're listening. Playing the piano ['guitar'] allows you to do both at the same time." -Kelsey Grammer

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