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  • Floating and bending

    After 20 years I am trying a floating trem (FR type) for the first time . It is all set up and works well. Stays in tune.
    I particularly like that I can get a gentle vibrato just palming the bridge without going for the bar.

    One problem I find though ( I know this is old news to some of you) is that when I bend notes up on a string any bass strings I have ringing or droning will dip by a semitone or so. I can see the mechanics of why but wondered if using heavy or light strings minimises this effect ? (I'm on 10's right now)

    I can live with it if thats just the way it has to be but will have to rewrite a couple of passages
    Less is more

  • #2
    Originally posted by Chordite View Post
    ...I can get a gentle vibrato just palming the bridge without going for the bar.

    I do something similar, but I shortened a stock vibrato bar to 3.5 inches (9 cm), as I don't want to break or induce wear on the bridge components by repeatedly handling the bridge directly.

    And, then there are a few "bar replacements" out there...

    Know anyone with a MIG welder?



    http://merch.umphreys.com/Product.as...4407&pc=UYAM42



    Comment


    • #3
      Other then using additional springs, its part of the beast.

      Only advice I can give is to get the height correct so the angle isn't too steep and compounds the problem.

      To do this you tune to pitch, pluck the G string and pull up on the whammy. The bridge should contact the body when the note reaches an A note.

      This angle seems to be the best in maintaining tuning bit on a fulcrum bridge the best and its why Fender recommends adjusting the bridge that way. If its higher the string pull is greater and detunes the remaining strings down in pitch more when all strings are bent.

      The whole idea of using a whammy however is to get bent tones without having to bend strings. You can use baseball bats on there and still be able to bend them smoothly. Technique using a whammy is what its all about. The guitarist that does it best is likely Jeff Beck. He's a master at using a whammy and other then a few others like Hendrix, he knows how to make the whammy work for him well.

      Comment


      • #4
        For Floyds you can get look at a tremelo-no. Lots of info on the web. I had a Floyd once but hated it before even trying what I mentioned, so no experience. Maybe someone else can chime in. Pretty sure it's like blocking a Fender, no pull up.
        http://www.harmonycentral.com/t5/Electric-Guitars/I-smeared-bacon-fat-on-my-strat-now-it-stinks/td-p/16697195

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks into nation That device is close but (of course) doesn't do the one thing I want which is to block dive (which I dont use) but not rise. I think simply blocking the trembloc will do that to stop anything divebombing but still allow the pitch raise or palming technique. so we are moving forward here
          Less is more

          Comment


          • #6
            I have an FR on my Kramer and ended up blocking it and adding springs. I still get some issues with double stops because of the FR. It's way better but not perfect.
            Hamilton Steele CD's / Hamilton Steele MP3 Downloads / Hamilton Steele iTunes

            Comment


            • #7
              As mentioned - it's just a trade-off. You need more tension.

              Hey - I just had an idea! Make a split bridge that has a Trem on strings 1,2,3 and a fixed bridge on 4,5,6!
              This space left blank by accident

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by koiwoi View Post
                As mentioned - it's just a trade-off. You need more tension.

                Hey - I just had an idea! Make a split bridge that has a Trem on strings 1,2,3 and a fixed bridge on 4,5,6!
                Interesting idea, all you would need is a saw and 2 more pivot points (or just the saw on a fender )
                Less is more

                Comment


                • #9
                  *Runs out to the workshop with Strat...*
                  This space left blank by accident

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by koiwoi View Post
                    . . . Hey - I just had an idea! Make a split bridge that has a Trem on strings 1,2,3 and a fixed bridge on 4,5,6!
                    Ya know, that's not a bad idea. I'm a fixed bridge man myself but it could work for some people.
                    Official HCAG “Theory-Challenged Hack”
                    Member of the IBANEZ ACOUSTIC ASSASSINS
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                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Radar-Love View Post


                      I do something similar, but I shortened a stock vibrato bar to 3.5 inches (9 cm), as I don't want to break or induce wear on the bridge components by repeatedly handling the bridge directly.

                      And, then there are a few "bar replacements" out there...

                      Know anyone with a MIG welder?



                      http://merch.umphreys.com/Product.as...4407&pc=UYAM42


                      I cut my bars just after the bend and then i use paper or plastic wrap and i put it over the trem hole before i push it in. The short bar stays back out of the way but stays fixed where i can pull or push it when bending chords i guess it works the same as your gizmo but i just but up the stock bar.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If your playing lead mute strings that your not bending.

                        Good vid on strat trem use.
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym3atIP1UY4

                        Here is how you do a sound check.
                        To make sure your E strings not vibrating out of tune.
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grBmQwLSlDw
                        Last edited by DaleH; 07-25-2014, 02:59 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks Dale, you have to like Knopfler, down to earth bloke, no ego stuff at all. Like me he learned without a pic.

                          I always kick myself because a friend in the early seventies was always trying to talk me into watching local gigs by a band and I didn't because I thought name sounded like another of the second rate whacky pub bands that were everywhere at the time .
                          That band was Brewers Droop and of course it was the young Mr Knopfler's band so I missed out, and how.

                          Less is more

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chordite View Post
                            After 20 years I am trying a floating trem (FR type) for the first time . It is all set up and works well. Stays in tune.
                            I particularly like that I can get a gentle vibrato just palming the bridge without going for the bar.

                            One problem I find though ( I know this is old news to some of you) is that when I bend notes up on a string any bass strings I have ringing or droning will dip by a semitone or so. I can see the mechanics of why but wondered if using heavy or light strings minimises this effect ? (I'm on 10's right now)

                            I can live with it if thats just the way it has to be but will have to rewrite a couple of passages
                            It's the nature of the beast. I hate it, but I love the FR or any floating trem.

                            I have learned to compensate when doing double stop bends by slightly bending the "unbent" note a little. It's not ideal but can get you by in some situations.

                            Other than that, if you must have precision, you need a fixed bridge. Sad to say.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Im sure you guys dont want to hear this but the steinberg trem setup is the best floating bridge to setup ive ever used. If you know how much of a pain it is to setup a full floating bridge the steinberg has a lock. You lock it tune it then unlock it. After its unlocked you just have to turn the large spring screw to re-tune all the strings back. Just like you do with the floyd but WAY easier and quicker.

                              I think when Eddie use to use a quarter he screwed to the top of his frankenstrat, he would turn the quarter so it slid up under the floyd to lock it, then he would tighten the springs so they pulled the floyd hard against the quarter sort of locking it. Then restring or tune it, slide the quarter out and then loosen the springs till it was back in tune.

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