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where can i learn great jazz licks?

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  • where can i learn great jazz licks?

    I just started learning jazz fusion licks from players I see on youtube gear reviews. Its pretty fun those jazz licks. Are there standard jazz licks like in blues? basically learn the solos of crossroads by cream and you can be sure you have a good arsenal of blues licks. Where can I learn the common jazz licks to start with? I was thinking of buying instructional videos of the great fusion players.

  • #2
    If it were me....I would try this:

    http://artistworks.com/guitar-lessons-chuck-loeb

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    • #3
      To learn jazz really well it really comes for knowing your chord and chord inversions and interchange them within a progression. As you get better at learning the chords you realize they are broken down into three basic categories, bass, harmony and melody. Many of those leads come from within those chord voicing's. Learning to interchange those chords is where the real fun begins and it greatly expands your musical depth and knowledge.

      There are many videos you can get that can get you started. Guys like Mel Bay and Joe Pass are masters at chord voicing and there are many others. If you have a full Netflix account they do have about a half dozen Jazz and blues training DVD's you can get. Otherwise you'll need to buy them.

      They can only get you so far in an hour or two of instruction. Most are broken down into sections and give you short introductions on the various levels of learning. Each instructor has their own unique styles too. Listening too allot of Jazz is important as well. Not just modern Jazz, but all the classics that have been played for many decades.

      Taking lessons is the best option of all. If you have a good instructor who can teach you the music from the ground up, theory and all, you'll have the strongest ability and style. He can not only teach you want your mind needs to know but he can have you work on specific exercises that are best in improving your physical development, The Wax On/Wax Off approach you need to developing your hands to play what your mind tells them too. Teaching both mind and developing the hands are interlocked and both equally essential.

      If all you do is clone others playing you are slave to playing only those songs and styles. If you develop the mind as you develop the playing skills you will be the Eveready Bunny that keeps gong and going, never run out of new ideas you want to try and over time this becomes something you do in real time as you play. That's the real key to Jazz. You use a basic musical structure but the players are pretty much all soloists who constantly adlib their parts with multiple variations.

      A chord part may use the same chords but the player may use dozens of different inversions of the same chords, and those inversions may follow what some other player is doing as he adlibs a melody. The chord player may see the leading is going up an octave so he immediately changes his chord voicing to follow or complement what the other is doing. This is why jazz can be so difficult to learn. You have to be highly knowledgeable about what you can play as alternates, and then you use your skill playing with other players to pull it off in a cooperative jam session.

      In rock music you often have a more rigid approach. You have set leads and choruses, breaks and all that. In jazz you may have the bass player playing the lead one minute and the keyboard or drummer doing his thing the next. The players need to be able to jump from being a soloist to a backer of another player doing a solo instantly. That not easy stuff especially if you're just beginning to play. Working with other players is a key element that cant be underestimated.

      There are many types of jazz too. You have stuff that's more highly structured and other stuff that's 100% free lance one take wonders you only experience once in a lifetime live.

      Like I said, The best method is to take lessons. If you cant do that then at least get some good instructional videos to get you going. Some have tabs and charts that are used with the video which can be extremely beneficial. I do have several of these DVD's and I can say they are worth every dime you spend on them. Much of what you learn can be applied to any type of music you play so it doesn't go to waste.

      Here's a few.

      This might be good for beginners. http://www.halleonard.com/product/vi...3&subsiteid=7&
      Or this http://www.learnandmaster.com/guitar...tyles-covered/

      I have all of these and learned something cool from each.

      http://www.amazon.com/Solo-Jazz-Guit.../dp/B000EBGENM

      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/MB...zz-guitar.html

      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/HO...zz-guitar.html

      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/RD...s%3A-jazz.html

      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/HO...zz-guitar.html


      http://www.guitarcenter.com/Music-Sales-George-Benson--The-Art-of-Jazz-Guitar-DVD-103847927-i1322035.gc?source=4WWRWXGP&gclid=CJPa-LuO3r8CFSpo7AodHFkAkA&kwid=productads-plaid^65687964522-sku^103847927@ADL4GC-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^27122174802&nce=1

      http://www.musiciansfriend.com/books-sheet-music-media/hal-leonard-john-pizzarelli--exploring-jazz-guitar-instructional-dvd?source=3WWRWXGP&gclid=CLKYmM6O3r8CFWoR7AodHSsA SA&kwid=productads-plaid^57304456747-sku^H64108000000000@ADL4MF-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^30425224347 Larry Carlton is one of the greats in modern rock jazz, You want to make sure you get his albums as well.
      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/HL...y-carlton.html
      http://www.guitargallerymusic.com/HL...-volume-2.html



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      • #4
        WRGKMC, that was a solid post, very nice.

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        • #5
          For the record...the link I provided above is an online class, and you would actually get live one on one (or live group) lessons from an absolute master guitar player and musician.

          wkrp is right- a video lesson can help...but if you want to learn efficiently and completely- real lessons are the way to go.

          A long time ago, I took lessons from Dan Faehnly- an absolute genius player in the jazz field but a complete guitar player and musician. That's the key- being a good guitar player AND musician. Not always the same thing.

          I walked into Dan's studio amongst sounds of EVH, Randy, Dio, etc. He asked me what song I wanted to learn, and I told him "teach me how to play guitar". His eyes lit up and he got to work scribbling triads and some scales and exercises. Although it was with a jazz flavor- it was about understanding playing guitar. How scales, arpeggios and chords fit together.

          Once you understand that, the boundaries of genre playing disappear. You certainly can focus on genre's, but becoming a complete player is really what's best. I think that's what jazz guitar excels at- truly understanding the fretboard, positions, chord voicings- playing both inside AND outside the box.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Steve2112 View Post
            For the record...the link I provided above is an online class, and you would actually get live one on one (or live group) lessons from an absolute master guitar player and musician.

            wkrp is right- a video lesson can help...but if you want to learn efficiently and completely- real lessons are the way to go.

            A long time ago, I took lessons from Dan Faehnly- an absolute genius player in the jazz field but a complete guitar player and musician. That's the key- being a good guitar player AND musician. Not always the same thing.

            I walked into Dan's studio amongst sounds of EVH, Randy, Dio, etc. He asked me what song I wanted to learn, and I told him "teach me how to play guitar". His eyes lit up and he got to work scribbling triads and some scales and exercises. Although it was with a jazz flavor- it was about understanding playing guitar. How scales, arpeggios and chords fit together.

            Once you understand that, the boundaries of genre playing disappear. You certainly can focus on genre's, but becoming a complete player is really what's best. I think that's what jazz guitar excels at- truly understanding the fretboard, positions, chord voicings- playing both inside AND outside the box.
            Since you had that training, I'll ask this question. As you got more advanced and your mind focused on the notes, you could hear the notes to Melodies/Harmonies/Bass/leads within those chord voicing's? The chords may not have all the notes of course and especially in Jazz the chords provide an outline of possible notes that could be played, but as you advance you're mind hears those notes even if they aren't being played.

            Its much like being able to whistle a tune off the top of your mind but it's a much more developed minds eye that hears those notes before they are played so you have time to get to them and play them in sync with the tempo. I have this happen all the time. I don't play allot of jazz but I'll seek out the chord changes and hear all kinds of voicing's in the background that I can hear. In fact the best songs I write usually have the melody someplace in that chord voicing and I usually pick the chords with accents for harmony or bass to accompany that melody. I may even switch it and have the guitar accent the melody and sing the lead in harmony.

            The guitar is a cool instrument because it can move through all three of those voicing's. Horns, for example need multiple horns to produce a polyphonic sound.. Even Violins are pretty much limited to two strings, but a Guitar Keyboard, Drums, can produce multiple voices at the same time so its a bit more challenging then other instruments.

            Even with a small band the guitar and drums you can produce a highly complex number of voices if you know how to play good musical arrangements. Add to that a bass player that can play more then a rudimentary thump, thump on a single note and instead spans some distance on his fretboard, a small combo can make some really big sounds.
            Last edited by WRGKMC; 07-24-2014, 11:08 AM.

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            • #7
              Yes WRGK....they are mostly triads. We had to work really hard to break me of open and power chords. So you do a triad...or 2 or 4. Then you invert it. Then you pick some other piece to build the triad. They can get these big long names lol, but once you break yourself of rudimentary rock training (there can be very technical rock training too)...a whole new world opens up. You separate guitar parts from bass parts and suddenly you have a very huge sound with color and personality.

              It was a long time ago, and it was only for short time, as he moved to play in the Portland Symphony. But it created a long lasting impact on me. I wish I could have continued lessons with him. I probably picked up 10% of what he showed me, but it made me 10 times the player I was before.

              The thing that makes the guitar more difficult makes it more magical. Like you say, those multiple voicings of the same chords- NOT like a piano - make it more difficult to handle yet provide incredible freedom and variety.

              Hopefully mbengs1 follows through with taking lessons. Have to find the right teacher, they are NOT created equal. (although- I guess any learning experience can;t hurt, right?)

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              • #8
                Transcribe some jazz solos of your favorite player and practice the licks over the tune. Note the underlying chords. Practice the solo along with the recording until you get wicked chops.

                Then learn another tune and another solo over that tune. Rinse. Repeat.

                That's the tried and true method of the masters.

                Don't get bogged down in theory until you get some chops. Don't avoid theory but don't get lost in it. Learn and memorize the solos as a priority.

                Use a slowdowner program like Transcribe.
                Last edited by Virgman; 07-24-2014, 02:15 PM.
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                • #9
                  That's fine virgman...but if you don't know how to do it how ya going to do it? And an instructor can help you avoid bad habits at the outset.


                  I am kind of the opposite of you. I think you need a little help jumping off the diving board. Once you get wet, NOW you can take the reigns on your own...you have some of the tools of the trade from a knowledgeable person, and can use those tools to build better skills.

                  If mbengs was adept enough to just learn stuff...he wouldn't have posted here with his question.

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                  • #10
                    This is a tough one that I hear all the time. I honestly can't think of a way to fake jazz solos. The very essence of them is to weave beautiful but musically complex solos around complex chord progressions.

                    It's like trying to be a civil engineering "enthusiast" - you either know the theory or you're just copying something else.

                    I understand adding "jazzy" elements to blues solos, but that's not jazz.

                    Last edited by koiwoi; 07-24-2014, 06:33 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Virgman View Post
                      Transcribe some jazz solos of your favorite player and practice the licks over the tune. Note the underlying chords. Practice the solo along with the recording until you get wicked chops.

                      Then learn another tune and another solo over that tune. Rinse. Repeat.

                      That's the tried and true method of the masters.

                      Don't get bogged down in theory until you get some chops. Don't avoid theory but don't get lost in it. Learn and memorize the solos as a priority.

                      Use a slowdowner program like Transcribe.
                      Came in here to say this. Andy Summers once said it's good for you to spend eight hours on your favorite jazz solos.

                      Plus, it helps to listen to more jazz. The reason I don't play much jazz is simply because I don't listen to a lot of it.
                      .

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Steve2112 View Post
                        That's fine virgman...but if you don't know how to do it how ya going to do it? And an instructor can help you avoid bad habits at the outset.


                        I am kind of the opposite of you. I think you need a little help jumping off the diving board. Once you get wet, NOW you can take the reigns on your own...you have some of the tools of the trade from a knowledgeable person, and can use those tools to build better skills.

                        If mbengs was adept enough to just learn stuff...he wouldn't have posted here with his question.
                        I hear you and understand your thoughts.

                        Here's how you do it without knowing how to do it.

                        1) Get a recording of a tune by a jazz guitarist you like. Get it off youtube or wherever.

                        Like this one that begins around 1:30. Locate the solo(s) in your tune and transcribe it.



                        2) Get the lead sheet of the tune so you know the basic chords of the tune (use this website if you like: http://www.ralphpatt.com/Song.html

                        3) Using a slowdowner program, transcribe the solo. You can even change the key of the song if necessary.

                        4) Practice the solo 1 million times.

                        Is this all you need to learn to play jazz? No, of course not. But if you want to play a solo over All Blues for example, then this will get you up and running and get some licks under your fingers. No need to get lost in the theory maze to learn a few licks. You will of course pick up more and more knowledge as you progress in jazz.
                        Last edited by Virgman; 07-25-2014, 06:31 AM.
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                        • #13
                          Since all jazz licks have to be stolen, they cannot possibly exist.
                          Originally posted by Unconfigured Static HTML Widget...




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                          • #14
                            To me, Charlie Christian's solos are a good starting point. Not terribly complicated or dissonant, they're deliciously logical and sweet, to my ears anyway. Even further back, Django Reinhardt, although Django was a LOT friskier/riskier!

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                            • #15
                              I don't know. Everyone is looking for short cut methods.

                              The first instrument I played was back in grade school when I was 9. I was taught how to play properly and taught to read music. Did that for about 4 years and played in the school orchestra. I had a pretty good ear to begin with because most of my family were musical. I knew most of the music of the great masters and progressed rapidly in reading music fluently.

                              At about 11 (1969) got my first guitar. I tool a few lessons to learn my basic chords and after that I could tab out songs from records and learned them that way. I later took Music theory in High school and was able to write compositions in 4 part harmony using "The Rules" of how notes move together. (once you learn the rules you're taught all the cool ways of breaking the rules)

                              Acoustic Folk music was big then and I started getting into finger picking. I took a couple of more lessons at a music store and learned to play rag time tunes on the guitar. The teacher used Tabs which was a short cut to actual musical score. I worked up to some very difficult compositions and was using triad and quad chords along the entire neck.

                              The hardest composition I learned to play note for note was Masons Williams Classical Gas which I learned from tab. The instructor I had for Violin at that time gave me some one on one to learn that song, and I eventually played that song in front of a full orchestra at the age of 13 in front of a packed house of over 5000 people. I can tell you I was absolutely petrified with stage fright that night. I actually froze during a portion of the song but did recover. I had a standing novation and was basically in shock at that point.

                              Days after my whole life changed in that school. I was no longer a nobody. Every kid in school knew me by my first name and I played with the best musicians in town from that point on. One thing I did learn was Glory doesn't last. You're only as good as the last work you've done and if you haven't got a steady stream of challenges, you can quickly wind up being a nobody.

                              The chords I used in those early songs were the same chords used in Jazz of course, but I had a hard time using those chords for anything but those song. Reengineering those chords and using them in other songs was very limited. I eventually got into blues or rock and played in many cover bands. Toured professionally for a good 10 years and all of that, but I always had this lack of understanding of how to develop those Jazz chords and put them together.

                              I eventually got back to doing some in depth study of how Jazz chords work. I'm no master of jazz but I can hold my own. Even at the age of 56 I still go back those basics when I'm on the skids and find new avenues for using the things I've learned.

                              My one regret is I should have taken more lessons when I was young. It would have saved my all kinds of hard work and frustration getting to where I am now. Even if its only a half hour a week you can learn more in that half hour then you can spending months slugging it out on your own.

                              So the question really is, is copying songs by ear really a short cut? It surely does seem like it at first because you do get results, and you do get better playing the notes. but in the long run you are going to lack the things you really need to excel above your peers. Once you learn the theory it simply becomes part of you. Its not a ball and chain you carry around you need to avoid finding alternative short cuts.

                              So again, for someone just beginning who loves music and has the balls to want to learn music well, I say take some lessons. You'll get a bunch of people who never took lessons telling you you're stupid or wasting your money, but all of that comes from the fact they wish they had the guts to do what you're doing. The old adage, misery loves company is alive and well especially amongst guitarists that have exceptionally large egos.

                              Once you get in bands you will learn from other musicians and they learn from you. If all you have is the ability to copy others, you haven't much mojo under the hood. Its great when you can do that too, but communicating on a musical level with others saves so much time, energy and frustration that can be put to better use entertaining an audience or just excelling beyond your average garage band. Taking a normal blues song and adding some extra jazz chords and riffs can really spice things up, and raise some eyebrows. Others will notice you have some formal training and be respected for that talent.
                              Last edited by WRGKMC; 07-25-2014, 08:45 AM.

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