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  • Need some advice on painting a guitar

    I just purchased this Strat body from Guitar Fetish for my first guitar building project and need some advice on how to go about painting it. It has a satin black finish on it and I want to paint it white. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Originally posted by SuperStrat1977 View Post
    I just purchased this Strat body from Guitar Fetish for my first guitar building project and need some advice on how to go about painting it. It has a satin black finish on it and I want to paint it white. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    Beats the heck out of going to Guitar Fetish and buying one of these in the first place
    (Or am I missing something? )


    http://www.guitarfetish.com/METALFLA...e-_p_8873.html

    Is it too late to exchange the black body for a white one ?
    Last edited by Chordite; 06-03-2014, 05:47 PM.
    Funny how minimalism goes on and on

    Comment


    • #3
      I use Dupli-color. Rough the body up with some 300-400 grit and spray with the Dupli-color white primer.
      Sand with 300 grit and do your color coats. Thin coats you can do a coat every 10 minutes. Just read the can.

      If it looks good after 3 coats and 30 minutes dry time, you can start your clear coats if your goiing to use clear. Again just read the can.

      This is one of mine with primer ready for paint. I always do mine outside on a clear day.

      I don't wet sand polish mine after. I just use rubbing compound by hand. Not really looking for that new guitar shine.
      Last edited by DaleH; 06-03-2014, 06:16 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Chordite View Post

        Beats the heck out of going to Guitar Fetish and buying one of these in the first place
        (Or am I missing something? )


        http://www.guitarfetish.com/METALFLA...e-_p_8873.html

        Is it too late to exchange the black body for a white one ?

        Comment


        • #5
          I found this body in the factory blowout section for $25 plus I was able to get a 15% discount so I figured "why not?"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chordite View Post

            Beats the heck out of going to Guitar Fetish and buying one of these in the first place
            (Or am I missing something? )


            http://www.guitarfetish.com/METALFLA...e-_p_8873.html

            Is it too late to exchange the black body for a white one ?
            It appears the body is from the "factory buyout" clearance section. Less than half the price of a finished one plus the fun of doing it yourself.

            I have a lot of confidence in anything Dale H says so there's your plan IMO

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SuperStrat1977 View Post
              I found this body in the factory blowout section for $25 plus I was able to get a 15% discount so I figured "why not?"
              Cool

              So your choice is to strip it or find some good dense primer to mask the black.
              People suggest automotive like duplicolor , I have also had success with Plasti kote
              Not sure if it is available in the US .
              I don't find duplicolor very durable compared to factory finish, Hammerite smooth white spray is a fairly tough paint designed for metalwork which might be worth a try.
              Last edited by Chordite; 06-03-2014, 07:54 PM.
              Funny how minimalism goes on and on

              Comment


              • #8
                Dale has a few tricks...some he said and some in the pic. But I guess you really only learn by doing. Being fearless and lucky.


                You can see Dale put a "handle" on the guitar. Nice. And a "clear day" is fine...most importantly make sure it's not too windy. Blown dirt or sand or whatever can kill your finish. Be sure to go easy on the coats. Start light on your first coat....don't let it run or get orange peel. If it were me I'd wait a bit longer than 30 minutes. Clear coating is tricky!

                Patience and detail are key!

                Did I mention I would rock the black? Looks great. But if you are dead set....just take your time, use your instincts. Patience. It's a bit of work...the sanding and the soft painting and sanding and inspecting and painting and sanding....and good luck with clear coats. That's even harder.

                Keep us updated!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Steve2112 View Post
                  Dale has a few tricks...some he said and some in the pic. But I guess you really only learn by doing. Being fearless and lucky.


                  You can see Dale put a "handle" on the guitar. Nice. And a "clear day" is fine...most importantly make sure it's not too windy. Blown dirt or sand or whatever can kill your finish. Be sure to go easy on the coats. Start light on your first coat....don't let it run or get orange peel. If it were me I'd wait a bit longer than 30 minutes. Clear coating is tricky!

                  Patience and detail are key!

                  Did I mention I would rock the black? Looks great. But if you are dead set....just take your time, use your instincts. Patience. It's a bit of work...the sanding and the soft painting and sanding and inspecting and painting and sanding....and good luck with clear coats. That's even harder.

                  Keep us updated!
                  The dupli-color primer is thick and sands nice. Take your time and get that right and the rest is pretty easy..

                  Dupli -color is dry to the touch in 10 min. If you wait to long one coat will not bond into the other. Just follow the can instructions and you will be fine.

                  The stick is a handle and there is a hole in the other end to hang it up to dry. Dirt, sand and bugs are a bitch..alright.

                  Never tried that Plasti kote.

                  No clear coat, just buffed the paint a little.




                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How easy is the Plasti kote to do?

                    Oh and I don't think I would strip the body. Up to you but I don't know how many hours or days you want to put into a $20 body.

                    Last edited by DaleH; 06-03-2014, 09:03 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DaleH View Post
                      How easy is the Plasti kote to do?

                      Oh and I don't think I would strip the body. Up to you but I don't know how many hours or days you want to put into a $20 body.
                      Plasticote is enamel. I don't suggest using enamel on a guitar. I did it once and it was the worst mistake I ever made. I put several costs on and it took a good year to completely solidify. The stuff dries from the outside in so it builds up a skin and it seems like its dry. Then you stick it in a guitar stand and the stand leaves marks on the paint. Even three years later, I had it hanging on the wall and there was a mic cord resting against the body for a month or so. The cable's vinyl insulation must have caused some kind of reaction with the paint and glued itself to the guitar body. You might expect that if its been freshly painted, but 3 years later?

                      I went back to using either Lacquer, Polyurethane or Tung oil only. Lacquer is the best because each cost melts into the previous coat to make one thick coat. Poly goes on like layers of an onion and its a bitch to work with and clean up. Tung oil is the easiest but for colors you can only add oil based stain to darken it (or stain the body) Lacquer is the easiest to repair if you ding it later or you screw up applying it. It can be buffed to a mirror finish and is very durable.

                      I have tried rattle can lacquers for cars. My results weren't the best. The Car stuff is designed for metal that doesn't breathe the same. Its very hard and if you crunch a car body it shatters like glass and flakes off in chunks. I've had that happen to the guitar I finished with it and lost chunks after it was dinged. If you use it on a guitar body you need to use a good shellac base coat and give it enough time to dry hard, then sand it baby ass smooth. It will be rock hard and the body expansion and contraction should cause minimal issues with cracking and checking. Afterwards you use between ten to 30 thin coats of clear lacquer clear coat. You can sand between coats and remove any flaws.

                      Like I said, lacquer melts into the previous coats so any sandpaper scratches are completely erased. You do need a clean environment that's bug and dust free and around room temp. If its outside and its high humidity the finish will trap moisture and fog up and turn white. That's especially hard to see doing a white body.

                      I'm not sure how much you saved on buying the black body over a white one but expect to spend a good hundred bucks on chemicals and supplies to do it right. If you're inexperienced it may require do overs which makes it even more expensive, Trick is take your time and use very light coats.
                      There's three reasons for this. One it dries quicker, two, its easier to fix a botch if there's only a light coat, three you avoid having drips and highlights that require stripping it back down. You also want to do some reading up on the topic. You can visit the reranch site which has good info and google up furniture restoration.

                      Refinishing seems like a simple thing before you actually give it a shot and see how your work compares to a factory finish. I've done at least a hundred guitars and I still consider it to be the nastiest job of all. With my builds I usually use natural finishes now so I don't have to deal with the issue with paint compounding the problem. If I can use Tung oil its a great finish because you can build it up thick like lacquer and its really durable.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        ^^^ That sounds about right.
                        If you count your time and money spent on painting a body to factory finish it's cheaper to buy painted by far.

                        With spay equipment you can add hardener to the paint that makes the paint much more durable than any can type spray can achieve.

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                        • #13
                          I have often considered asking a car body shop to spray a body for me with 2 pack paint left over when they finish a suitable color car repair. Should give a very durable finish.
                          Funny how minimalism goes on and on

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            They may do it if you have it primed ready to hang for paint. Don't think they will want to screw around with any prep work when they can make $500 an hour in the paint both. Be sure not to touch it with your bare hands before paint.
                            Any prints will leave spots.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chordite View Post
                              I have also had success with Plasti kote
                              Not sure if it is available in the US .

                              Yes, various sorts of Plasti-Kote rattle can paints are available in the USA.

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