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Why use basswood and birch for the guitar body?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mad axe man

    BODY BASSWOOD & BIRCH
    NECK 1Pc MAPLE
    SCALE 25.5"
    FRETBOARD MAPLE
    INLAY BLACK DOT
    BRIDGE
    TAILPIECE POWEROCKER
    HARDWARE CHROME
    PICKUP CONFIG S-S-S
    PICKUP'S SUPER 5 (N)
    SUPER 5 (M)
    SUPER 5 (B)
    CONTROL 1VOL 1TONE
    5W SWITCH
    PHASE SWITCH
    FINISHES BK (BLACK)
    WH (WHITE)




    This axe does?
    whay tone does birch produce?


    Cool looking guitar.

    Comment


    • #17
      guitars using basswood:

      Music Man AXIS and JP models

      Ibanez JPM

      Ibanez JS models

      Ibanez RG models

      just to name a few, from the top of line to the cheap guitars.

      that means 2 things:
      1. basswood is cheap.
      2. it sounds good.
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><br />
      <u><b><font color="red">XT Brotherhood</font></b></u><br />
      <u><b><font color="red">MAZI BEE KICK ASS MILITIA</font></b></u><br />
      <br />
      <div class="bbcode_container">
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      <div class="bbcode_quote_container"></div>

      <i>Originally posted by LAracer </i><br />
      <b>...But hey, at least we <i>know</i> we suck. So we keep the volume low (or use headphones) at GC (or wherever), and we keep trying. Better than those ****************************s that suck and don't even know it. </b>

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      • #18
        We use lots of American Basswood, in our solid body, and semi hollow body guitars, not because it's cheap, but because of it's tonal values. With a Rock Maple neck, a Basswood body balances out the natural high frequencies from the Maple, and adds a lower tonal 'color' to it.

        It's a wonderful tonewood. Yes it dings easily, but with care, they hold up well. The cheap imports are using a crap plywood now anyway. Good American Basswood isn't cheap!

        GB

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        • #19
          Originally posted by guitarcapo
          BAsswood is a soft, cheap wood. It dents easily and manufacturers love it because it's readily available (furniture manufacturers avoid it like the plague). It's cheap and very easy on CNC router bits. It has a sterile quality to it's tone. Even response without a lot of coloration. Not very good sustain due to it's soft nature. If you use a lot of effects and just need your guitar to send out a uniform signal to be processed it might be better. Most of a guitar's tone comes from the pickups anyway and it is extremely lightweight compared to other guitar hardwoods.

          Personally I don't see the sense in paying thousands to have a luthier make something out of basswood for me. I can buy a cheap guitar to get THAT.

          Whoa, hold on a sec.

          Basswood is very soft, but also very resonant. If the guitar was purely acoustic, it would make for a very low sustain instrument. However, a resonant electric guitar vibrates in sympathy with the sound waves from the amplifier. Basswood generally has very good sustain, as do many resonant guitars.

          //S
          <div class="signaturecontainer">Playing lite rock and eeeasy listening in the Mazi Bee KICK ASS Militia. <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/tongue.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Stick Out Tongue" class="inlineimg" /> <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wink.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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          • #20
            Another really good tonewood, is Balsawood. Yes, it's a hardwood (believe it or not), but it's too soft to really use in an instrument. Some solid body guitars have a Balsa core, between the top and back laminates, the tonal properties are much like Basswood in this case, but that's another story.

            On our acoustic guitars, the only place we use Basswood, is in the top and bottom kerfing. It blends the vibrations from the top, to the sides and back well.

            BTW, tonewoods are based on their 'speed of sound', or the speed at which certain acoustic frequencies travel through them.
            Yellow Birch, is also called 'poor man's Maple', as it has much of the properties of Sugar (Rock) Maple, with just a little less density, and stiffness.


            GB

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            • #21
              Believe it or not cardboard also makes an excellent tonewood.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Matter-Eater Lad
                Believe it or not cardboard also makes an excellent tonewood.


                That is ridiculous, and doesn't even deserve a response!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Guitar Builder


                  That is ridiculous, and doesn't even deserve a response!


                  So you...responded to him?

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                  • #24
                    High end Ibanez, Suhr, and Ernie Ball guitars have Basswood bodies. Lots of Fenders have Alder and Ash bodies. Les Pauls have Mahogany and Jacksons have Alder and sometimes Mahogany.

                    And no matter what, you're still going to sound the same.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer">SPAM:<br />
                    None For Now.<br />
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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Bucketboy
                      High end Ibanez, Suhr, and Ernie Ball guitars have Basswood bodies. Lots of Fenders have Alder and Ash bodies. Les Pauls have Mahogany and Jacksons have Alder and sometimes Mahogany.

                      And no matter what, you're still going to sound the same.


                      I suppose you also think that a hollow body guitar sounds like a solid body?

                      You are seriously mistaken!

                      These woods are different, and these differences make the guitars sound different. An LP has a mahogany neck, and body, with a maple top cap. An SG is all-mahogany. They sound different as a result. An Ash bodied Strat, sounds different than an Alder one.

                      The best way to tell about the sound quality of even a solid body guitar, is to play it un-plugged, and listen to it.

                      We've been doing this for a long time, and it still amazes me, that so much wrong information is still out there.

                      GB

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                      • #26
                        I was talking about solid bodies. I own a les paul, and I own a Ibanez. They're both radically different guitars, b/c of electronics and hardware. They sound pretty different too. But I sound the same through both no matter what. Some people don't seem to the fact that tone comes from the fingers, and not inanimate wood.
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">SPAM:<br />
                        None For Now.<br />
                        </div>

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bucketboy
                          I was talking about solid bodies. I own a les paul, and I own a Ibanez. They're both radically different guitars, b/c of electronics and hardware. They sound pretty different too. But I sound the same through both no matter what. Some people don't seem to the fact that tone comes from the fingers, and not inanimate wood.


                          If your tone is coming from your fingers, and not the guitar, then 1. Sell your guitars 2. Run, to the patent office, and show them your fingers, 3. Join the circus and become rich. or 4. do some research on what your strings are attached to Bud!

                          Ignorance is bliss, huh?

                          GB

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                          • #28
                            My dean has a basswood body
                            I LOVE my tone

                            I do not see any problems

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                            • #29
                              All of the solid body and semi hollow body electric guitars we build are through-neck guitars. Over half of these have American Basswood body sides, and the tone is great. It tonally balances the Rock Maple we use for the necks, and neck-through structure.

                              GB

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Matter-Eater Lad
                                Believe it or not cardboard also makes an excellent tonewood.

                                yes i agree!
                                it is very toney!
                                and cheap and you can cut any body shape you want!
                                i had a custom made cardboard les paul style guitar and it was friggin incredible!
                                only prob was that bent easy!

                                now about BIRCH, it is a bit mellower than maple so it is realg good for those that want less highs than maple produces
                                sound like a basswood/birch combo would be pretty friggin balanced tonally

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