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What scale(s) did you master after the pentatonic minor?

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  • What scale(s) did you master after the pentatonic minor?

    The title pretty much says it all.

    I've tried to learn lots of different scales, but the pentatonic minor scale is the only one that I can play forwards, backwards, sideways and upside down in my sleep and use as the basis for solos.

    What was the next scale that you mastered?
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  • #2
    Major, minor. Now I don't really think in terms of scales or where I am on the fret board. It just sort of happens.
    Listen...

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    • #3
      major pentatonic, natural minor and major, harmonic minor maybe....

      Comment


      • #4
        Major, minor. Now I don't really think in terms of scales or where I am on the fret board. It just sort of happens.


        Well, then you need to think WAY, WAY back to when you had been playing for less than a year or two.

        At some point, all of us have had to learn scales. I'm just trying to figure out what to master next. There are lots of bizarre scales to choose from.
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><b><u>Gear &amp; Stuff</u></b><br />
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        Captain in the <font color="Sienna"><b>SG <font color="Green">A</font>r<font color="DarkGreen">m</font>y</b></font>, 101st Airborne Division<br />
        Honorary Mention on bassesofalessergod's <b>&quot;a list of jerks&quot;</b>, 4/17/07<br />
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        • #5
          I would say get the full major and minors down, then harmonic minor and modes. Also make sure you learn them in every position. Its a great fret board exercise.
          Listen...

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          • #6
            Actually the next thing I moved on to was mixing the pentatonic major and minor based on the chord changes. Thanks, Clapton.

            Then incorporating passing tones into both. Thanks, Beck.
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            • #7
              Major, minor. Now I don't really think in terms of scales or where I am on the fret board. It just sort of happens.


              I'm like that when I'm noodling around.

              I try to incorporate diminished, chromatic, arpeggios or parts of etc.
              It really stretches the ear (sounds like ****************), but it makes for interesting sounds and I even come up with some usable licks-that I forget.
              <div class="signaturecontainer"><i>Simplicity is the law of nature; it's our understanding or lack therof that makes things seem complex. ( Mine-or maybe I read it somewhere and it stuck in my subconscious until I decided to create this sig<img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/confused.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Confused" class="inlineimg" />)</i><br />
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              Ex.- Their grammar is atrocious. <br />
              <br />
              <i>they're</i>- contraction of 'they are'<br />
              Ex.-They're not literate.<br />
              <i>there</i>- a place; can also be used as a 'dummy' pronoun <br />
              Ex.-There is a dictionary available online.</div>

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              • #8
                I'm like that when I'm noodling around.

                I try to incorporate diminished, chromatic, arpeggios or parts of etc.
                It really stretches the ear (sounds like ****************), but it makes for interesting sounds and I even come up with some usable licks-that I forget.


                Sounds like you're a perfect candidate for buying a BOSS RC-2 loop station. Someone said it's like his little musical notepad for jotting down cool riffs and licks.
                <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="2"><b><u>Gear &amp; Stuff</u></b><br />
                <br />
                Captain in the <font color="Sienna"><b>SG <font color="Green">A</font>r<font color="DarkGreen">m</font>y</b></font>, 101st Airborne Division<br />
                Honorary Mention on bassesofalessergod's <b>&quot;a list of jerks&quot;</b>, 4/17/07<br />
                Proud owner of The Legendary <b><font color="DarkOrange">Orange</font></b> <a href="http://tinyurl.com/IkeaGorm" target="_blank">IKEA Gorm Pedalboard</a><br />
                </font></div>

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                • #9
                  Minor I think...

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like you're a perfect candidate for buying a BOSS RC-2 loop station. Someone said it's like his little musical notepad for jotting down cool riffs and licks.


                    I should, but I bought a modeler...which I'm not using bc I can't get around to plugging my 'lectric in.
                    I'm hoping that will change once I get my house rearranged and the BH5H stack shows up.
                    <div class="signaturecontainer"><i>Simplicity is the law of nature; it's our understanding or lack therof that makes things seem complex. ( Mine-or maybe I read it somewhere and it stuck in my subconscious until I decided to create this sig<img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/confused.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Confused" class="inlineimg" />)</i><br />
                    <br />
                    <i>their</i>-nominative case; can be plural or singular; indicating possession.<br />
                    Ex.- Their grammar is atrocious. <br />
                    <br />
                    <i>they're</i>- contraction of 'they are'<br />
                    Ex.-They're not literate.<br />
                    <i>there</i>- a place; can also be used as a 'dummy' pronoun <br />
                    Ex.-There is a dictionary available online.</div>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Every so often I play around with the equal spaced scales
                      The patterns on the fretboard are pretty easy to remember

                      All whole steps: B C# D# F G A B etc.

                      All minor thirds: B D F G# B etc.

                      All major thirds: C E G# C etc.

                      All sound weird because they have no clear start or end point since they lack the asymmetry of the usual natural major, minor, pentatonic, harmonic minor, etc. but interesting for some tension.

                      The sound a bit like the sounds from those first BASIC programs on Apple IIe computers from 1980s highschool "programming" classes.

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                      • #12
                        I don't know. I learned it them in extended position, and I've been messing around with a major-sounding one that I learned form Prince, so that. But as for names, I just can't really say.

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                        • #13
                          What scale(s) did you master after the pentatonic minor?

                          You mean there's another scale?

                          You wouldn't know it by listening to 90% of barroom guitarists (that would include me, by the way).

                          I have been forcing myself to play different scales lately while I am practicing, but when I'm playing live and a guitar break comes around, I resort back to what I know best most of the time.

                          Armchair Bronco is right. The Loop Station is perfect for learning new scales and techniques. I like to record a simple 4/4 beat with a single chord (E7, for example) at 120 BPM. Then I spend an hour or two soloing over that single chord with the sole intention of making it interesting.

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                          • #14
                            The minor scale, you can then just drop it 3 frets to make the appropriate major scale. [thinking like a newish guitarist]

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                            • #15
                              Major.

                              But I haven't "mastered" anything.

                              Agreeing with DocJeff. 9 times out of 10 I use the pentatonic scale with some major scale and chromatic notes thrown in.

                              Unless I play jazz. Then I use the major scale with chromatic notes thrown in.

                              So learn the major scale next.
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