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  • Eric Clapton Strat blocked Tremolo

    Dear Harmony Central community

    One question on Fenders Eric Clapton signatur models

    it has blocked tremolo

    As I rarely use mine on my Hwy1 I want to block too

    a.)Could anybody of you give me the dimensions of the blocking wood piece
    b.)which wood is it?
    C.)Can I eventually get some photos how it is done?

    Thanks a lot

    Roland
    Guitar's
    G&L Comanche,ASAT Deluxe Semi H&Special,Invader,Legacy Dlx
    Fender Strat CS ,Strat Hwy1,AM STD
    Gretsch Setzer
    AMP's
    Mesa Boogie:MARK V,Recto
    Axe-FX 2
    Carvin V3M,VibroChamp
    H&K Grandmeister 36
    T21 Trademark10

  • #2


    Never measured,just cut to fit.
    This one is oak.
    HCGB trooper #187
    A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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    • #3
      Thanks a lot

      Start to understand

      Roland
      Guitar's
      G&L Comanche,ASAT Deluxe Semi H&Special,Invader,Legacy Dlx
      Fender Strat CS ,Strat Hwy1,AM STD
      Gretsch Setzer
      AMP's
      Mesa Boogie:MARK V,Recto
      Axe-FX 2
      Carvin V3M,VibroChamp
      H&K Grandmeister 36
      T21 Trademark10

      Comment


      • #4
        The dimensions vary on where you want it blocked. Do you want your bridge on the body of the guitar? If so, tighten the trem claw first, then find something that fits. If not, find something fits in the front, and the back.
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        Comment


        • #5
          Pardon my ignorance, but what is the trem claw?

          Comment


          • #6
            Here's mine. 100 years old black ash from an old table leif. A lot of guys use a 9 volt battery.(I would be afraid of acid leaking!)

            Comment


            • #7
              So here's a question. If you're Eric Clapton and can afford to have two thousand guitars, why would you block your Strat tremolo instead of getting a fixed bridge Strat?

              Comment


              • #8
                So here's a question. If you're Eric Clapton and can afford to have two thousand guitars, why would you block your Strat tremolo instead of getting a fixed bridge Strat?


                because you can.

                and probably because to him it sounds or plays different.
                Rules for a Happy Life:
                Never attribute to malice, that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.
                I am happy with who I am. You do not have to like me.





                Originally Posted by aenemated
                doc always has been and always will be. He behaves as if he is 18 years old with worlds of wisdom



                6 senses, 5 cables, 4 different coloured guitars, 3 amps, 2 pedals, 1 footswitch.
                Statutory Disclaimer: Any advice I may give is ill-informed and is to be treated with the utmost suspicion.

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                • #9
                  Pardon my ignorance, but what is the trem claw?


                  The trem claw is the piece to which the springs from the tremolo block are attached.They are secured to the body by two 1 1/2"-2" semi coarse threaded screws.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I don't want to start an argument about it, so suffice it to say that LOTS of people think that the trem, with that big steel block and vibrating springs, makes a difference to the tone. EC also has always insisted on the classic bent/stamped steel saddles, never using the cast versions.
                    I can believe it. I always felt that flattening the Strat tremolo was in itself a massive improvement, so I can see how a fixed bridge wouldn't be the same.

                    EJ sounds a bit off the deep end, but I guess you're allowed to be when you sound like he does.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      EC also has always insisted on the classic bent/stamped steel saddles, never using the cast versions.


                      He is well-known as someone who sticks with what works for him, whether its guitars, shoes, restaurants, cars, cycles, fishing rods or whatever. I guess most of us are eventually the same under all this GAS.
                      Rules for a Happy Life:
                      Never attribute to malice, that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.
                      I am happy with who I am. You do not have to like me.





                      Originally Posted by aenemated
                      doc always has been and always will be. He behaves as if he is 18 years old with worlds of wisdom



                      6 senses, 5 cables, 4 different coloured guitars, 3 amps, 2 pedals, 1 footswitch.
                      Statutory Disclaimer: Any advice I may give is ill-informed and is to be treated with the utmost suspicion.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The reason clapton has a blocked bridge is because he prefers the sound of a hardtail strat. Also where the tremillo springs go on his strat he has a 9v battery mounted there to power the pre amp boost and active pickups in his guitar. I know becaust i did all of the to a custom guitar i built. enjoy

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I hardtailed my MIM Strat, but had loosened the claw so that the springs were held in place with little tension. Then I blocked the remaining cavity:



                          The bridge now sits flush with the body, and no more floating trem, but was this the wrong method for this mod?

                          /hijack
                          Originally Posted by Jimmy James


                          "Who's the douche baggist who still has their internet on?! We're trying to save lives here!"

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                          • #14
                            Also where the tremillo springs go on his strat he has a 9v battery mounted there to power the pre amp boost and active pickups in his guitar. I know becaust i did all of the to a custom guitar i built. enjoy


                            I've got some news for ya - the trem springs are still in there on Clapton strats: there is simply a cut-out for the battery (and a custom trem cover with a moved hole to compensate)

                            Here is a picture I just took of the actual trem cavity of my actual Clapton strat. This is completely stock, exactly how it came from the factory 21 years ago. I've opened it maybe three times in the last decade to change the battery; that's it. This should answer your questions. FYI, the block is about 1 3/8 of an inch in width, 3/8 of an inch tall, and 2 1/4 long.

                            Recipient of the coveted MBM Kicking Ass Award!! ...still proud of that one.

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                            Originally Posted by Strung_Out


                            your rig is excessive and loud; I dig that.

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                            • #15
                              So here's a question. If you're Eric Clapton and can afford to have two thousand guitars, why would you block your Strat tremolo instead of getting a fixed bridge Strat?


                              The trem springs and the trem's limited connection to the body dampen the attack on the note, they add a noticeable sag when the note is picked. And the springs add an almost reverb quality to the tone (whihc is what EC mentions when asked about it). A hardtail has a much more aggressive attack on the note, it's a big step closer to a Tele in that regard.

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