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  • #31
    I've been through this dilemma as well, as I only started playing a few years ago. My thoughts:

    - A good amp with a lousy guitar trumps a good guitar with a lousy amp (I went from a Silvertone 5W practice amp to a Peavey Classic 30 - like night and day!).

    - You have an MIM Deluxe Strat - these are good guitars. If you had a bullet Strat (which aren't even that bad, IMHO), I might have recommended upgrading that. But your guitar is good.

    - The best thing is practice. At the beginning, I was frustrated, and assumed that all the cat and ferret noises coming from my amplifier were a result of the guitar and the amp. So I bought my Classic 30. But much of it was due to fretting too hard (sharpening the notes), poor picking technique, accidentally muting due to poor left-hand technique, and so on. I can't stress what a huge difference I saw after taking private lessons with a great teacher. He corrected my technique, and I began improving far faster than if I had gone it alone. Now, I can sound decent with that little Silvertone, even if I do sound better after switching to the Classic 30. I'm never satisfied with how I play, and have so much to learn, but when I step back and think of what I can play now, and how much I know, I really have come a long way.

    - (and the only way to do that is with practice, not plastic.)

    I love Vox amps. Get the AC15, and play the hell out of it. And if you can afford it, look at some lessons with a good teacher, too.

    EDIT: I see you already have a Super Champ. Those are great. My advice: don't sell it - keep it, save up your money, and then buy the AC 15.


    Yup...true. Need more practice!
    ASAP - as slow as possible
    KISS - keep it simple & stupid

    Comment


    • #32
      Yeah, the Blue Dog is Weber's take on the Celestion Blue. They definitely don't sound identical.... the Blue Dog is more of a creamy Celestion Blue with more bottom end and less compression.

      I had an AC15CC1 and have an AC15H1TV and I tried both amps through a 50W ceramic Blue Dog and the 15W Alnico Celestion. For the CC1, I think I actually preferred the Blue Dog as that amp was slightly kinda harsh (I use single coils 90% of the time) and the Blue Dog smoothed it out a bit. Not to mention it costs $200 less and if you get the 50W version, it will pretty much last forever in the AC15.

      I think it's the biggest improvement that can be made to the CC1. The C1 has the Greenback which is great in its own way, but warmer sounding than I prefer from a Vox. I'd definitely go for the Blue Dog.

      But yeah.. with your last couple posts, I think I'd think about ditching the Super Champ entirely and getting either a new C1 or a used CC1 and getting the Blue Dog as funds allow. I personally would do this before changing out the pickups. Having said that, I had the CC1 for a couple years and have had the AC15H1TV for a couple years now and I do prefer brighter single coils with both amps. I have one strat with a set of Duncan SSL2s that sounds spectacular on the bridge+middle or bridge+neck positions. In fact, that guitar through that amp is probably my second favorite tone I can dial in right now. Duncan SSL1s and SSL2s can usually be bought for $80 used or so. I have several higher end sets of pickups but sometimes, everything just comes together with certain pairings.





      Man you got great stuff to play! Want to buy you a cold beer!
      ASAP - as slow as possible
      KISS - keep it simple & stupid

      Comment


      • #33
        It's all important, but if you're going to really spend a lot of money on once piece of equipment it's got to be the amp. There are so many cheap guitars (including the Mexican strats) that sound so good these days that you can really get some amazing tones as long as you make the right amp choice. If you're playing to an audience there is no way they're going to be able to tell the difference between a Mexican strat to an American Strat, but they will sure as hell be able to tell the difference between the Super Champ and the AC15.

        Comment


        • #34
          You have a good guitar. The only "American" Strat I have is a Hwy One, I have four MIM Deluxe Strats and they are every bit as good as anything else. They might not have as much spit and polish, but they play just as well and, with the same pickups, sound just alike. I have been playing close to 30 years and have owned and played enough to know. You can always change pickups and/or upgrade electronics in the Strat down the road.

          I have a Super Champ XD and I really like it. Lots of usable tones, and super to gig with over a 2x12 cab. The main reason the SCXD sounds like it does is because it has a 10" speaker. A better speaker will sound better, but it will still be a 10" speaker. That's why, when I gig the SCXD it goes over two twelves. It's a whole 'nother world when it's moving more air. I also have a Blues Jr., which I dearly love.

          Take your guitar and try the AC15. Try not to get caught up in it sounding new and see if it really does sound better, more like what you hear in your head. If it does, then get it. They are great amps. I would replace the SCXD with an all tube amp before I would go changing guitars.

          If you get a chance, also try the Jet City 1x12 combo. The Peavey Classic 30 is an awesome amp. I have a Valve King 1x12 that is really nice, but they need a decent speaker. You can find them cheap used all day long.
          ................The REAL Brah


          Good trades/deals with: Fusion1, SOLARPIMP, Lonnie99, twotimingpete, Tupelo Sun, moon shadow, Florbastang, shooter 123, Wolfboy1, almost enough, meowy, ntmo, lovellintn, fulcrumpoint, matt rhoades, kojdogg, cadfael, Daveydude, DaveAronow, Smithshred

          Comment


          • #35
            Honestly, if you can swing the cash without selling the Super Champ, and you can get a Vox AC15C1 locally (to save on shipping) I'd just buy one locally with a clear understanding that you can return it if it doesn't meet your expectations. Give it a 25 days or so... get as much play time as possible in it on and see what you think. Understand that they put crap tubes in them and that it will sound better both with new power tubes and esp will sound more traditionally Voxy if you swap out for a Weber Blue Dog as funds allow. You'll be able to sell the Greenback for probably $75 and the Blue Dog will cost you about $130. Pair of JJs tubes for about $30 shipped if you don't have a local Sam Ash.
            Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius:

            "When it comes to gear vs talent I'll be the first to admit that I sit in the Mayor's seat in Poserville."

            Comment


            • #36
              "resonant body" good point. That's the feeling I found when play some american standard Strat. Something I can get response.


              Yep...a great guitar will "sing" it's notes....like they just pop and fly off the neck. It will feel alive in your hands. I've played a lot of strats and most of them aren't like that. Even some at prices you would think should be like that.

              But as others have mentioned......the "average" strat is still a very nice sounding guitar. They just tend to sound more like you are playing the pickups. Good enough because it will still deliver that strat tone. But a weak amp is a pain in the ass to listen too.

              My general rule with any piece of gear I try is...if I start laughing uncontrollably because I can't believe how good it sounds or plays, then I know I should consider it.

              Comment


              • #37
                Not to knock your gear, but to tell you from vast experience...Do NOt try to polish a turd. What I mean is that you have gear worth a given price. By upgrading it, you will never get more out of it in a sale. That is just the way it is.

                Do not upgrade the amp parts in your Fender SX. I had one and the amp is not that special. For a Vox tonality and versatility, you might consider trying a new Vox Valvetronix VT40+ first. They offer the Vox and Fender tones, as well as others with many nice built-in effects to alter your tone further. I use one for smaller venues and have mic'd it for one hour concerts, where I didn't want to have to bring out larger gear for such a short set. The amps are terrific! I don't know your financial price point, but it sounds as though it is about $1,000. If you get a Vox Valvetronix for about $239 and the 5 button foot switch, it is another $60. Save up a bit more money and trade your guitar in, and you then have both a new guitar and a great amp.

                I update my gear every so often, so I understand what you are going through mentally, trying to figure out the best way to get everything you want.

                I had to sell all of my gear and was left with one guitar and one amp. It took me several years to accomplish what I needed to do...basically. I am still refining my gear and it has taken me another year and a half to just get the cables, volume pedal and a wireless, due to how slow the economy is at this time.

                Try out in a store, the Vox Valvetronix with the newer Fender guitar you are looking into and see if this works for you. This way, you will be far closer to your goal and have spent far less money, but will have the flexibilty of the tones you want plus a lot more.

                Good luck and good hunting.
                Two of the nicest gentlemen, and most talented people: Mssr's Diezel and Krampe.
                Je préfèrerais mourir sans un sou dans une rue en Europe que de vivre en Amérique sous l'administration actuelle. Alizée est la meilleure. Vous, les princesses pop américaines, n'avez aucun talent, aucune classe, et vous sonnez comme de la merde. Sarkozy et le reste de l'Europe se moquent de notre président dans son dos.

                Comment


                • #38
                  You have a good guitar. The only "American" Strat I have is a Hwy One, I have four MIM Deluxe Strats and they are every bit as good as anything else. They might not have as much spit and polish, but they play just as well and, with the same pickups, sound just alike. I have been playing close to 30 years and have owned and played enough to know. You can always change pickups and/or upgrade electronics in the Strat down the road.

                  I have a Super Champ XD and I really like it. Lots of usable tones, and super to gig with over a 2x12 cab. The main reason the SCXD sounds like it does is because it has a 10" speaker. A better speaker will sound better, but it will still be a 10" speaker. That's why, when I gig the SCXD it goes over two twelves. It's a whole 'nother world when it's moving more air. I also have a Blues Jr., which I dearly love.

                  Take your guitar and try the AC15. Try not to get caught up in it sounding new and see if it really does sound better, more like what you hear in your head. If it does, then get it. They are great amps. I would replace the SCXD with an all tube amp before I would go changing guitars.

                  If you get a chance, also try the Jet City 1x12 combo. The Peavey Classic 30 is an awesome amp. I have a Valve King 1x12 that is really nice, but they need a decent speaker. You can find them cheap used all day long.


                  Not sure the difference between 10' and 12', but I've tried SCXD and Fender Blues Deluxe and I think it's a big difference. I can sell some pedals and save for a AC15 then. Thank!
                  ASAP - as slow as possible
                  KISS - keep it simple & stupid

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Not to knock your gear, but to tell you from vast experience...Do NOt try to polish a turd. What I mean is that you have gear worth a given price. By upgrading it, you will never get more out of it in a sale. That is just the way it is.

                    Do not upgrade the amp parts in your Fender SX. I had one and the amp is not that special. For a Vox tonality and versatility, you might consider trying a new Vox Valvetronix VT40+ first. They offer the Vox and Fender tones, as well as others with many nice built-in effects to alter your tone further. I use one for smaller venues and have mic'd it for one hour concerts, where I didn't want to have to bring out larger gear for such a short set. The amps are terrific! I don't know your financial price point, but it sounds as though it is about $1,000. If you get a Vox Valvetronix for about $239 and the 5 button foot switch, it is another $60. Save up a bit more money and trade your guitar in, and you then have both a new guitar and a great amp.

                    I update my gear every so often, so I understand what you are going through mentally, trying to figure out the best way to get everything you want.

                    I had to sell all of my gear and was left with one guitar and one amp. It took me several years to accomplish what I needed to do...basically. I am still refining my gear and it has taken me another year and a half to just get the cables, volume pedal and a wireless, due to how slow the economy is at this time.

                    Try out in a store, the Vox Valvetronix with the newer Fender guitar you are looking into and see if this works for you. This way, you will be far closer to your goal and have spent far less money, but will have the flexibilty of the tones you want plus a lot more.

                    Good luck and good hunting.


                    Good suggestion on VT40+~I will definitely try that before I buy AC15. Flexibility is a concern...however it seems the tone is more important for me now...I m kind of guy that want to stay same tone for a long time.
                    ASAP - as slow as possible
                    KISS - keep it simple & stupid

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      As others have said, get the AC15. I have one, and it's awesome. No need for a new Strat until it's easily affordable (MIM Strats are fine guitars as-is), and you already have the amp you need.

                      Weber speakers aren't the same, but some guys prefer them over the Celestion due to the fact that they're smoother. I have the Celestion Blue in my AC15, and it's absolutely fantastic. The Weber one would be likewise very good. I also have a 2x12 cab that I may one day upgrade to Blues - probably Weber ones for a change.
                      Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Hi Guys, I finally got my AC15C1 !!!!!!!! and I decide to keep the SCXD for stereo, it sounds great!!

                        However, why I found AC15 sounds thin compare to SCXD?
                        (SCXD: channel one, stock speaker)
                        (AC15: normal channel, no tone cut)
                        ASAP - as slow as possible
                        KISS - keep it simple & stupid

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          If your AC15 is brand new, it needs time for the speaker to break in. The Greenback is definitely not thick. For most guys that play Vox amps, if anything the Greenback is too thick.

                          The speaker right out of the box can play as loud as it ever will in the treble region. As it gets more broken in, the spider and the voice coil get moving and get a little bit loosened up, the bottom end and the mid-range will open up and will sound more balanced. Probably 24 hours of actual play time will get you close and after about 72 hours of actual loud play time, it will be just about as broken in as it will ever get.

                          And right about then, you'll realize you really want a Weber Blue Dog like that cratz2 guy recommended back on page 1.
                          Originally Posted by Doctor Morbius:

                          "When it comes to gear vs talent I'll be the first to admit that I sit in the Mayor's seat in Poserville."

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Are you finding it thin while running in stereo? They might be out of phase with each other.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Congrats! And the amp was the way to go. But yes, it needs time to be broken in. The nice thing is that your amp is just going to sound better and better over the next few weeks.
                              '06 Eastman T146 w/ Vintage Vibe HCC Pickup
                              '07 Danelectro 59-DC Reissue
                              Anonymous Acoustic Archtop w/ K&K Archtop Pickup

                              '67 BF Fender Bassman Head
                              LopoLine 1x15 Cab w/ Jensen CP-15N

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                AMP.

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