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I am completely musically illiterate.

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  • #46
    True, but this stuff can be learned, for free, on the internet.


    Prolog: I've learned/learning from my Learn & Master Guitar course on DVD and a previous guitar teacher. Would you be able to supply me some links where I can find this on the internet? It would be most helpful. Thank you, Steadfastly
    Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&%)7#

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    • #47
      I'm not musically trained being an autodidact. But I do have extensive knowledge of chords and how they function as well as experience with them. I can read a chord chart on the fly and keep up with a big band. But I can only read the musical staff EXTREMELY slowly and that's no use in the real world. It would be more accurate to say that I can't read music on the staff. I know a bunch of musical terms, some of which I even know what they mean...
      __________________________________________________ ___________________

      Yamaholic --- PpP --- Old geezer with a grey beard

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      • #48
        i'm a music student so i know a good chunk of theory, but i don't think you need to be a music student to have fun with it. i mean, if it makes you a better player it's going to make playing more fun.

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        • #49
          I taught all 3 of my kids the basic chords to guitar. 2 got it. One didnt. Play what you hear in your mind. Dont copy anyone.

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          • #50
            By learning to play advanced music by others, you'll absorb some theory whether you realize it or not.

            When I first started playing, I worked on figuring out as many classic rock to prog metal tunes as I could by ear, using tab only if I was stumped. I no longer use tab for almost anything as I can usually figure it out by ear, but it's a good thing to spend some time with early on. I sure as hell can't read "real" music, but I don't care. I can do what I need. In the early days, I went for technique, speed and endurance, but after I got through that, the most important thing was achieving TONE. No tone = no care. If you dig your tone, you will be more inspired to create. And you'll inspire others.
            Originally Posted by Stonedtone


            The tears were worth 4M votes



            ....regarding Obama's tears over Conn. school massacre







            Originally Posted by moonlight


            I could care less about the so called "rights" of gun owners. They've even got those rights wrong. The second amendment has more to do with militia and not you can own one just because.









            Originally Posted by Mossy Moss


            You really are a dim bulb, aren't you Moonie?



            "Germans who wish to use firearms should join the SS or the SA - ordinary citizens don't need guns, as their having guns doesn't serve the State." Heinrich Himmler

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            • #51
              I haven't read this whole thread, but here's my opinion:

              You don't need to be a theory wizard to play guitar in bands and do well. You should, however, know chord names, keys, and some basics (like where notes are on the fretboard, the fact that there are no sharps to B and E, etc). People who brush off knowing any theory like it will kill their creativity are often annoying. If you're playing anything slightly technical, they can't follow along. If you can spare the time to practice, you can spare the time to learn basic theory. There are plenty of books and online resources to help you.
              Guitars: 3 Fender Strats, Fender Jazzmaster, Squier Bullet, 2 Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson ES-339, Gibson Les Paul Jr. Special, Epiphone Les Paul, Epiphone Dot, Epiphone SG, PRS SE Custom 24, Ibanez AS73, Hamer Duotone, Larrivee D-03R, Takamine EG5013S, 1951 Epiphone Devon, Ibanez SR305 (bass)Pedal Chain: BBE Green Screamer -> MXR Distortion III -> Boss CE-5 -> EH Stereo Pulsar -> Boss DD-20 -> BBE Boosta GrandeAmps: Vox AC4, AC15, AC30, Pathfinder 10, DA5SoundCloud

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              • #52
                I taught all 3 of my kids the basic chords to guitar. 2 got it. One didnt. Play what you hear in your mind. Dont copy anyone.


                I don't agree with this. If you are not exposed to the music of others, it's difficult to hear music in your head. It's like giving someone a book who can't read and asking them to read it.
                MIA Fender Strat / Gibson Les Paul Studio / Custom Telecaster / Washburn WI66 / Custom Stratocaster / Martin D15S / Guild D55 / Simon & Patrick Cedar / Martin HD16R LSH​

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                • #53
                  Prolog: I've learned/learning from my Learn & Master Guitar course on DVD and a previous guitar teacher. Would you be able to supply me some links where I can find this on the internet? It would be most helpful. Thank you, Steadfastly


                  I started with the guitar section of about.com - learned how to play various open and barred major and minor chords. Then I learned about other chords, modes, and so on, basically by typing "suspended chords", "diminished chords", "blues structure", etc., into Google. Wikipedia works, too.

                  I wasn't learning from scratch - I had to learn chord progressions, inversions, cadences, major/minor scales, and a couple hundred Italian musical terms in high school band. But any time I came across something I didn't know, search engines were able to solve my problem.
                  Yamaholic
                  American Special Stratocaster, Yamaha SA-503 TVL, Telecaster, Partscaster, Peavey Classic 30

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                  • #54
                    What's a good way to learn the notes up and down the fretboard? I can't believe I don't know that yet. I've been practicing scales and boxes but I can only memorize the shapes, I never seem to put it all together. I guess just practice. I've only been at it about 2 months. It's enjoyable but I have much more fun just noodling around in my own old style.
                    Overdone, Overdrive, Over-live, Override

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                    • #55
                      What's a good way to learn the notes up and down the fretboard? I can't believe I don't know that yet. I've been practicing scales and boxes but I can only memorize the shapes, I never seem to put it all together. I guess just practice. I've only been at it about 2 months. It's enjoyable but I have much more fun just noodling around in my own old style.


                      Start with the open strings:

                      E, B, G, D, A, E

                      Then move up one fret. That corresponds to a semi-tone increase (read up on the chromatic scale).

                      Fret 1:

                      F, C, G#(Ab), D#(Eb), A#(Bb), F

                      And so on. One thing you could is create a set of flashcards. Each flashcard would represent a fret, and would have six notes on it, one for each string using that fret.

                      Memorize each flashcard. Be able to name the note for each string for each flashcard. While you're practicing this, fret each note. This will help reinforce where each note is.

                      This is tedious at first, but if you practice it every day, you will learn the notes!
                      Yamaholic
                      American Special Stratocaster, Yamaha SA-503 TVL, Telecaster, Partscaster, Peavey Classic 30

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                      • #56
                        I'm in the process of learning the fretboard.I learned songs in C Major, learned the octave system and memorized the E and A strings. Now I'm using major triad arpeggios to make a more exciting way to memorize this.
                        MIM 2003 Fat Strat. Must develop chops.

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                        • #57
                          Practice playing any scale you learn on one string.

                          For instance, play an E major scale on the low E string starting with the open E then go to the 2nd fret and play the F#, 4th fret G#, 5th fret A and so on...

                          Once you learn the scale on each string then learn the scale on each set of two strings
                          E/A
                          A/D
                          D/G
                          G/B
                          B/E

                          Pick a time frame to learn a scale within and stick to it. It could be one scale a week, one a month, whatever works best for the player.

                          Remember that once you learn a scale in the F/1st fret position all you have to do is move the same fingering one fret up and you have a new key using the same fingering, for example the fingering for an A major scale at the 5th fret on the low E string is the same fingering for a Bb major scale that starts at the 6th fret on the low E string.

                          From the open string note to the octave 12th note at the 12th fret There are 12 keys and in terms of scales each fret is a new key.

                          Learn the Circle Of Fifths.
                          The link below is a good start.

                          http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/circle.html
                          "It's called the "American Dream" because you have to be asleep to believe it" - George Carlin

                          May your groove be wide and funky...

                          Skronk Free, Skronk Proud
                          The Sonic Mayhem Orchestra

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                          • #58
                            And I don't know if it's just me, but it is harder for me to think about the notes vertically across the fretboard compared to going on and down the neck.

                            And for the hell of it, I don't know why this has me stumped but I'll ask anyways:
                            I'm currently going over the CAGED method. My question is, say your root note is at the 5th fret E string, A. If I were to play the different CAGED scale patterns (C form, A form, G form,etc) starting at that note, would you still call all of them an A minor scale? Because in the Fretboard Logic book, they would call a C form scale on the 5th fret an F scale..probably because it is using the root note of the chord shape as the scale root?
                            MIM 2003 Fat Strat. Must develop chops.

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                            • #59
                              My question is, say your root note is at the 5th fret E string, A. If I were to play the different CAGED scale patterns (C form, A form, G form,etc) starting at that note, would you still call all of them an A minor scale? Because in the Fretboard Logic book, they would call a C form scale on the 5th fret an F scale..probably because it is using the root note of the chord shape as the scale root?


                              It depends on how the A note is functioning in terms of scale degree.
                              In your example of having the A note being called an "F" scale could be because the A note functions as the minor 3rd scale degree in the F major scale.
                              The corresponding mode for the 3rd scale degree for ANY major scale is the phrygian mode.

                              So starting on the A note and playing all the notes in the A phrygian scale will have you playing all the notes in the F major scale, but you'll be using the A minor tonality that the A minor phrygian scale produces.
                              "It's called the "American Dream" because you have to be asleep to believe it" - George Carlin

                              May your groove be wide and funky...

                              Skronk Free, Skronk Proud
                              The Sonic Mayhem Orchestra

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                              • #60
                                I know almost nothing. One time our church band leader said "Can you play that chord but with a sus 4?" I said,"No, but I can put my pinky finger on this string and make it sound different."

                                Seriously, over the past month I have learned (without much effort) patterns for the minor pentatonic, blues scales, and major scale. I wish I had tried to learn that stuff 30 years ago!

                                Until now I had always been afraid of moving beyond the first three frets. My grandfather was a legendary blue grass guitarist, and he never went beyond the first three frets, why should I?
                                The best piece of advice I ever got was when John Mayer told me, "Don't be a name dropper."

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